In the Kitchen With Laura June 2014

July 23, 2014

This the sixth in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about my program In the Kitchen With Laura. I’m running late, but here is the entry for June. Chickens

Take a look at our farm chickens:

Butter and Egg Money

On just about any farm in the 19th and well into the 20th century, a lot of its cash flow during the course of the year (except when it was time to sell a crop or livestock) was from the money the women made selling butter and eggs. Sometimes this was just the extras from what the family produced chiefly for its own use, other times it was a major undertaking designed to be a cash crop. This money was commonly referred to a “Butter and Egg Money.” Read more here.

In Laura and Almanzo’s case at Rocky Ridge, they were definitely in it for the cash money. Laura had a goal of making $1 of pure profit per hen and she usually made it. A neighbor was quoted in the Missouri Ruralist as saying she could get eggs in the winter when no one else could.

Laura’s operation was a lot more advanced than what Ma had done on the homestead. She had a large flock and produced a large number of eggs for sale.  She was also interested in the improvement of operations and chicken breeds and served as head of the chicken department at the local fair.

Leghorn Chickens

There are many, many different chicken breeds. Take a look in the poultry barn next time you’re at a 4H fair and you’ll be amazed by the variety.

Check out the Poultry Barn during show prep at the Iowa State Fair in 2012:

Many chicken breeds are bred with a particular purpose in mind, for example Cornish Crosses are large meat birds that put on weight at and incredible speed. Laura raised Leghorns a breed which sadly lays white eggs instead of brown (we’re brown egg people at home). Laura chose the Leghorn because they are known for having a small body size (so they don’t eat much) and for being prodigious egg producers, both factors that I’m sure helped her towards her one dollar profit goal. The downside is that they have small bodies so they don’t produce a lot in the way of meat. If you’re wondering where you might have heard of that name before, think Warner Brother cartoons and Foghorn Leghorn (the human sized rooster who spoke like a southern colonel, the character was in part a parody of comic character named Senator Claghorn on the Fred Allen radio show).

Read more about Leghorns and other breeds. Click on the Ls to get to the Leghorn section.

An Introduction to Eggs

Iowa Ingredient host Charity Nebbe has put together a very well done introduction to eggs and their role in the kitchen and in your backyard.

Watch the video and see if you can find some brown shell eggs and try them out in your favorite baked good. Can you tell the difference?

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Trundlebed Tales Brochure Updated

July 21, 2014
Sarah at the Ingalls Homestead, Dressed as Old Laura

Sarah at the Ingalls Homestead, Dressed as Old Laura

I’ve just finished an update on my brochure, take a look! Remember Trundlebed Tales is more than just a blog, I have a website, YouTube channel, podcast, Twitter, Facebook, etc. and most importantly, I speak in person. If you want to hear me, be sure to pass this on to your local library, museum, or event.

Brochure2014pg1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

McGuffey Museums in Oxford, Ohio

July 19, 2014

trundlebedtales:

One of the main things you hear about in one-room schools is the McGuffey Reader. If you want to learn more, a great place to start is at the McGuffey Museums in Oxford, Ohio.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

The early association of McGuffey with Miami University led them to collect his papers and various editions of his readers. The special collections library holds most of this material. There are finding aids are on the following link. Scroll down to William Holmes McGuffey. There are several different finding aids, several with much more information than typical finding aids. http://spec.lib.muohio.edu/publications.php

A digital scan and transcription of McGuffey’s papers is available here: http://doyle.lib.muohio.edu/cdm4/mcguffey

For many years, there was a special display of McGuffey material in the library. This included the 8 sided lazy susan style desk to keep multiple tasks open at once, the way we keeps multiple windows open on our computers today. After years of service as a private home and with various university functions, the house was purchased in 1958 and has been restored to a similar condition to when the McGuffeys lived there.  The McGuffey objects previously…

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Red Chief Tablets

July 17, 2014
Red Chief Tablet Plant

Red Chief Tablet Plant in St. Joseph, MO

Starting in 1906, a common sight in one-room schools was the Red Chief Tablet which was lined

Big Chief Print Block

Big Chief Print Block, Big Chief Tablet Mini-Museum

rough paper in a tablet with a red cover featuring the portrait of a Native American chief. The chief was a line drawing of a Chief from the Great Plains complete with a full feathered, headdress. These were originally manufactured by the WesternTab Company in the pictured building in St. Joseph, Missouri. It was eventually bought out by Mead who kept the operation there until 2007. (Dates given on the tour of the building.) Mead found that the costs for updating the building to change manufacturing styles was cost prohibitive and they liquidated all production there. This might have partially been under pressure to be politically correct because while many Mead paper products and designs were made here, after they left the Big Chief style table was no more. This left behind an entire campus of empty buildings (besides the main building located here, there were at least two warehouse facilities on adjoining blocks). After that they considered tearing down the main building where they’d been manufactured. Instead they converted them into apartments. It still has a very industrial feel, but has a roof garden and in innovate air system that involved areas of full turf on gratings between floors creating air flow pockets.

There hasn’t been much of an effort to track the appearance, history or changes in design of Big Chief Tablets over the years. Johnny Nimmons from American Trademark Publishing says, “the Western and Westab covers Manufactured by the Western Tablet Company are the oldest dating back to 1908. The other covers were manufactured by various companies around the country with different Big Chiefs being more popular in different regions. Western became Westab and then eventually Mead and was the largest manufacturer however, Southwest and Springfield had captured a good portion of the market as well.”

Interestingly the former Mead manufacturing building sits on the middle block of a four block stretch. At one end is the Pony Express Museum. In the middle on the other side of the street is the Red Chief factory building and in the middle of the cross street in the next block on the same side as the Pony Express Museum was the little white house that Jesse James was shot in. It’s directly behind where I’m standing in the picture of the factory above. (Note: On the other side of the James house is the Pattee House Museum, a large former hotel that completely dwarfs the little house which is always shown as if in a residential street in the movies. Apparently it moved from its original location to a ring road and then later moved again to its current location about 2 blocks south of the original.)

Big Chief Tablet

Big Chief Tablet Style Cookbook Cover, Mini-Museum

Mead had stopped their production in roughly 2004, but that left one-room school museums trying to give an authentic experience up a creek. I’m happy to tell you that a company in Texas bought out the rights for the designs and restarted their production. Today they feature nine of the original designs (it changed slightly over the years) in addition to three variations of Son of Big Chief (which my brother had when he went to school in the 1980s). Find the information here:
http://www.americantrademarkpublishing.com/Big_Chief.php

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Pepin Beyond Laura

July 15, 2014

Lake-Pepin-Beach It’s often interesting for Laura people to learn that others go these same lovely little Laura towns we do for completely different reasons. They might not even be aware that the town IS a Laura homesite. For example, people visit Mansfield, Missouri to visit the now famous heirloom Baker Seed Company, people visit De Smet, South Dakota in the fall and winter for hunting season, and people visit Pepin, Wisconsin as a trendy weekend destination from the Twin Cities.

The following local news story looks at Pepin from that weekend destination for urbanites perspective. For them the heart of the town isn’t seven miles away in a log cabin replica, but in the shoreline where the marina and specialty shops are.  Lake Pepin is wonderful for boating and it’s because of these weekenders that Pepin has far and away the best variety of restaurants for any Laura homesite despite the fact that it isn’t the largest one. It also has an element of art colony in the stores and several bed and breakfasts. The fact that Pepin can support two motels year round, plus more in surrounding communities is also thanks to these weekenders.

So take a look at the video and the next time you take a trip to Pepin be sure to check out this other side of the coin.

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/06/20/goin-to-the-lake-mike-and-angela-visit-pepin-wis/

And if you want to know what it’s like to go boating on Lake Pepin, we’ve got that covered too:

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Iowa Lincoln Highway Association

July 13, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I have updated this a few times when I discovered more information about the Iowa Lincoln Highway Association. I hope you enjoy it.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

I grew up around Highway 30, part of the old Lincoln Highway. In fact there is a seedling mile (where the road was paved in a small section to encourage people to cough up the money to do the rest) not far from here. The Lincoln Highway is second only to Route 66 in fame around here, so I was really surprised when a friend from New England recently told me that she had never heard of it.

The Lincoln Highway was the first highway across America. It was named after our 16th President in an effort to get people interested in promoting it. It strove to be the first paved highway and while that didn’t happen for quite a while, they did foster several local efforts at road improvement along the route. (In fact, it took it about as long to be paved as it’s taking to make Highway…

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Blind School Organ

July 11, 2014

DSCN0919-1 Great news! They’ve been able to find someone with pipe organ experience to play before the pageant both days (Aug. 1st and 2nd). This organ was added to blind school when the auditorium was enlarged after Mary’s time there, but it’s a beautiful organ and it’s a special treat to get to hear pipe organ music. For my regular readers, in case you missed it both the Paramount and Theater Cedar Rapids pipe organs – once declared completely destroyed – were successfully restored to working order after the Cedar Rapids floods. Sadly the Blind School Organ could use some of that same kind of restorative love and care. While it is still in playable condition it’s been a long time sitting silent and regular maintenance not attended to.  A new Mary Ingalls Society project will be to raise money to get the needed repairs for the organ.

The musician is Ruth Armstrong. Armstrong is a music educator at Alburnett CSD, a part-time church Full Frontorganist/accompanist, and vocalist.  She studied organ with Janice Cuffel in Marion and with Robert Burns at Simpson College in Indianola, graduating in 1977. She has played organ in various churches in Indianola, Estherville, Fredericksburg, Marion, and Cedar Rapids.  Ruth lives in Cedar Rapids with her husband, guitarist, Steve Armstrong.

What they’ve always known about the organ is the pipes and organ body are original from the 1902 instrument that was installed on the third floor chapel at the school and then were moved down to the current location when it was completed in 1913.  The internal workings of the organ were retooled in 1931.

Back in 2013, a tour of the school organist Sally Boie was interested in our organ and followed up getting this information from Donna Story. “Governor William Larrabee, Iowa’s 12th governor, presented eight organs to various places in Iowa.  In 1896, Larrabee had installed in the Union Sunday School at Clermont, the largest Kimball pipe organ of its kind (tubular Pneumatic action) existing in the United States today.” She followed up and found out that one of these eight organs was given to the School for the Blind “In 1902, Larrabee donated an organ to State College for the Blind in Vinton.  It was a Mollers organ.” Moller

Gov. William Larrabee was Iowa’s 12th governor and he and his wife Anna are remembered more than others because he has a preserved house, Montauk built in 1874 that is a State Historical Society.

Dean C. Zenor, Service Manager, Dobson Pipe Organ Builders, Ltd. who has examined the organ and prepared a report on its condition: “Through Wade Schott (the curator at Montauk, Governor Larrabee’s home site in Clermont) I was able to learn that the 1902 instrument was indeed a Moller and it was given by Governor Larrabee to the “State College for the Blind in Vinton”. Since there is a May 18, 1931 letter in your organ file from the Moller organ company stating that they built the School’s 1902 instrument, and that they were giving the School a special price as well as reusing most of the pipework from the 1902 instrument in the new one, it can be assumed that Gov. Larrabee’s organ is “still extant”, only somewhat altered in the form of the new 1931 instrument. What I have not yet been able to determine is if the casework and facade pipes are from the 1902 instrument or from an earlier tracker organ that was said to have been at the College for the Blind.”

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mary Ingalls Pageant

July 9, 2014

Save the DateFrom the committee organizing the Mary Ingalls Pageant:

“Mary Ingalls – Her Journey” world premiere Pageant is coming to the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School in Vinton, Iowa at 7:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, August 1 and 2, 2014. This production has received the endorsement of the Ingalls Wilder Heritage Trust. Seating will be by general admission and the cost of attendance at each performance is $10.00. Make plans to get your tickets now. Don’t miss this opportunity to be part of an historic event, held at an historic site.

You will see Mary’s journey from young girl full of dreams to a blind adolescent who believed those dreams were lost. Learn with her about the school in Iowa that would allow her to continue her education and give her tools for an independent life but at a cost nearly impossible for a family struggling for daily survival.   Follow her from the day she arrives at the Iowa College for the blind through graduation. See her life in DeSmet, South Dakota until age 63 when she died.

You will walk the same halls Mary walked for 8 years in the building where she lived and attended classes and listen to the bell at the top of Old Main that rang for Mary’s graduation and every graduation from 1877 up to the last one in June 2011.   There will be displays of historic photos, tools used in the education of the blind and in their daily life, and copies of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House” books in print and Braille.

A major roofing and repair of Old Main made necessary by the 2011 wind storm is just coming to an end so the grounds are not as tidy and well-manicured as usual, but you will see the majesty of the campus as you stroll over the grounds or join an organized tour.

So make plans to join us. Information on overnight accommodations and restaurants are available upon request.

Tickets can be ordered online at www.act1.org or by calling 319-214-0096.

Find their Facebook Page here and if you are on Facebook and attending please mark yourself as Going and either way please share the event on your timeline.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/IBSSS-Mary-Ingalls-Society/333765430057020

 

Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 4

July 7, 2014
3 GSP 1931 Postcards

3 GSP 1931 Postcards

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share April’s posted video.

This is another member of the Michigan branch of the Stratton Family. They didn’t remember the connection until they found it again through genealogy, but they have totally embraced it now. This is Dennis Stratton, Founder of Anya Farms in Northern Michigan and he talks about how his organic methods connect with Gene’s philosophy.

Summer of 1931 Dates

Summer of 1931 Dates

Video 4 is called “April 2014: A Life of Farming with Dennis Stratton.” It was originally published on YouTube on April 9, 2014.

They say about it, “To bring in the spring for the month of April, we meet Dennis Stratton–Founder of Anya Farms in Northern Michigan. Dennis discusses how his current farming ideas correlate with Gene’s, as well as the importance of recognizing today’s farmers and good food.”

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Happy Fourth of July

July 4, 2014

July 4th Trundlebed Tales I’ve actually been working on a Fourth of July post for awhile because the National Archives has put up a lot of video about their celebrations the last two years on their YouTube Channel and I’ve slowly getting them watched and organized, but since I didn’t get finished, instead watch this fascinating video about the recasing and care of the Declaration of Independence and a mystery handprint [my guess is it's from the guys in National Treasure :) ]

Declaration of Independence:

There has been a movement lately to get people to read the Declarataion of Independence on Independence Day which I think is well worth doing, know your rights. Find the text, high quality photos of the original, and more at the National Archives.
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration.html

Click on “Read Transcript” to get to the words in typeface.

Also, remember this year is the 200th anniversary of Star Spangled Banner flag.

- WATCH: July 4th at 8:30p ET on C-SPAN3: Star-Spangled Banner 200th Anniversary
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History event includes musical performances and ends with a simultaneous nationwide singing of the national anthem.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 


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