National Information Literacy Awareness Month

October 24, 2014

Information Literacy Supporter BadgeEach October our thoughts turn to National Information Literacy Awareness Month. Information Literacy. Information Literacy means making sure people can find, evaluate information for quality, and use the information that they need. Information Literacy is a big part of any library program. It’s no longer enough to be literate, as in being able to read, but you must be literate in figuring out where you can get the information you need and separating the wheat from the chaff to make sure what you’ve found is good. The abundance of information available online makes these lessons even more important and libraries more vital to society, not less. Last year I ran a confessions photo contest, but it didn’t get much response so this year Kirkwood Community College is doing a series of blog posts to try and make you more aware of Information Literacy.

Read a brief history and what is going on nationally here:
http://infolit.org/national-information-literacy-awareness-month-is-october/

You can also find the badge, like the one above, please share it on your various social media sites to help make people aware of the importance of good information:
http://www.librariesthriving.org/partnerships/2014-information-literacy-campaign
(Make sure you select your state before copying, it shows up on the badge.)

Find last year’s posts and Iowa’s proclamation on National Information Literacy Awareness Month here:
https://kirkwoodlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/10/04/information-literacy-awareness-month-comes-to-iowa/

And my best post so far this month about passwords:
http://kirkwoodlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/10/16/information-literacy-passwords

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 7

October 22, 2014
StrattonPorter Paperwork

Stratton-Porter Paperwork

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share July’s posted video. As I pointed out in Part 2, Doug Stratton didn’t have any family memories to pass along, but Monica Meehan Berg is a direct descendent and while she has no personal memories of Gene (her great-grandmother), she does have strong memories of Jeanette Porter (Gene’s daughter) who did a good job of carrying on her mother’s legacy.  If you followed me on Facebook last year you know the Anniversary Dinner in Gene Stratton-Porter’s honor in August was one of the things I’d really hoped to get to last summer and I didn’t, but this happily was filmed there.

Video 7 is called “July 2014: A Family Discussion with Doug, Dennis, & Monica.” It was published on YouTube on July 20, 2014. This video includes old family photos and artifacts.

They say about it: “Prior to the movie screening at the 150th Birthday Celebration Gene Stratton-Porter Gala, Doug, Dennis, and Monica share thoughts and stories with one another about Gene and her daughter Jeannette. They also discuss the inspiration Gene and her production company have had on The Stratton Foundation.”

I’m really very sorry I couldn’t attend this event. I think I would have really enjoyed it.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Thaumatropes

October 20, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I just checked and the links were still good. Really the only thing I have to add is that you can actually create your own Thaumatropes. All you have to do is come up with an image that can easily be divided into two and draw one half on each side of a stiff paper or cardboard disc.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

A few years ago at one -room school conference I was asked if I knew if anyone was making reproduction Thaumatropes. At that time I was unaware of any, but now I have found a source, so I’m sharing it.

Thaumatropes

Although  its producer, Historical Folk Toys, only sells directly in wholesale amounts, they have a series of old-fashioned games and toys. From their homepage you can find toys divided by time period.

http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catalog/toys5.html#2016

The Thaumatrope works on the same general principle as the buzz saw game people typically make with buttons, but with an added twist. The game uses the persistence of vision. On one side of the disk is half of an image, for example for the one pictured on the left, one side shows an empty cage. The other half is on the other side, in this example a parrot. When spun like a buzz saw the…

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Ep 60 Travel Tips for Laura Ingalls Wilder Vacations

October 16, 2014

The Laura Ingalls Wilder travel season is winding down and I’ve reached my 60th numbered Trundlebed Tales episode. In honor of this I’m going to finally do the special program that I’ve talked about doing in my Laura Ingalls Wilder monthly updates all summer. This is going to be a call in show where people can call in and share their favorite tip or discovery on any Laura related trip. This is taking a risk. I’ve reserved 60 minutes for the show and I don’t know if anybody will call in, but let’s try it and see what happens.

What Kind of Tips Am I Looking For?

I’m calling on fans and hope we get a lot of response. As people start planning their Laura Ingalls Wilder trips for next year we

Pepin Laura Days

Pepin Laura Days

want to give them the best advice and we’re counting on YOU! Call in and give your best Laura related travel tip. Which route do you take? What’s your favorite Laura trip related discovery? Is there a cool store everyone should visit? Where’s the best play to stay? Which homesites are best for adults only? Which homesites are best with kids? Single stop or big circle route? Should you do back to back pageants? Favorite non-related place to stop on way to homesite. Plus any related tip or hint you can think up.

When Is It?

Don’t worry, there’s plenty of time to think up your hint. The episode is scheduled for Thurs., October 30th, 2014 9 pm ET, 8 pm CT, 7 pm MT, 6 pm PT.

How Do I Participate?

Please call in at: Call in (714) 242-5253 or toll free 1-877-633-9389.  If you only call in once this year, this is the episode to do it. I’d prefer if you’d call in because it makes a more interesting show, but if you can’t call you can ask your questions in the chatroom while you live stream the episodes or you can tweet me @trundlebedtales or you can message Trundlebed Tales on Facebook or you can e-mail me at info@trundlebedtales.com. Just be sure to get that tip in.

You can also listen by streaming live or later:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2014/10/31/ep-60-travel-tips-for-laura-ingalls-wilder-vacations

Or download it for free on iTunes afterwards:
http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/trundlebedtales-blog-talk/id412309121

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Sloo and Slough aka Emily of Deep Valley

October 14, 2014

My beautiful picture A version of this was originally published on Beyond Little House.

Pronounce It Sloo or Sl-wow

When I was in De Smet, South Dakota one summer, although this happens almost every time I go, I was talking about the Big Slough and how you pronounce it. You get people who pronounce slough rhymes with moo and slough rhymes with cow. As always a quote from Emily of Deep Valley popped into my head. Emily of Deep Valley is by Maud Hart Lovelace.

Maud Hart Lovelace and Betsy-Tacy

Lovelace is most famous for her Betsy-Tacy books that were loosely based on her life growing up in Mankato, Minnesota. Her childhood home and the home belonging to her inspiration for Tacy have been purchased by the society and restored in appearance to when Maud/Betsy would have lived there. There is talk about getting Tib’s house (the other lead character in the books) as well which is on the next street. Places out of these books really exist, much as they do for Laura and other places from the books have been created by fans. The fan organization, the Betsy-Tacy Society is extremely well organized and puts on a very professional conference. Most fans love the main cycle of Betsy-Tacy books best (they are now all back in print so you can read them for yourself), but the one with a special place in my heart is Emily of Deep Valley, a sort of sequel to the side. Emily doesn’t appear in the other Besty-Tacy books, she’s several years younger than Betsy, but the Betsy-Tacy-Tib characters do make a rather large cameo appearance in Emily. I loved it because it’s such a beautiful picture of large town life at the time when high schools were becoming common. It’s a lovely little epoch until the Great War brings it all down, but in their Edwardian time bubble they can’t know that. I also admire Emily’s spirit and her plans which, due to her grandfather’s needs and old-fashioned perceptions, can’t include college. It was Emily I loved.

The Big Slough Or You Say Tomato

But to get back to De Smet and the Big Slough, other fans I talked to said they had the same thing happen to them. Hearing people refer to slough, as sl-wow instead of sloo also reminded them of Emily. It’s so nice to be with people who understand you. I hope you can make your own trip to De Smet and experience it for yourself.

Oh, and the other thing a slough reference makes pop into my head is Cherry Jones reading Farmer Boy. Jones, clearly not a farm girl, says hay mow (rhymed with row) instead of hay mow (rhymes with now). Every time I listen to it, I spend the whole time I listen to Farmer Boy automatically correcting her. Now you can too. ;-)

Lovelace, Maud Hart. Emily of Deep Valley. New York: Harper Trophy, 2000. ISBN 0064408582

“The Deep Valley slough, pronounced sloo, was the marshy inlet of a river. When Emily had first read Pilgrim’s Progress, after finding it mentioned in Louisa M. Alcott’s Little Women, she had pronounced the Slough of Despond sloo, too. She had called it sloo until Miss Fowler had told her in English class that Bunyan’s Slough rhymed with “how.” Miss Fowler had made the correction in a casual unembarrassing way, putting her emphasis on the fact that Emily alone, out of the class, had read Pilgrim’s Progress.” pp.15-16.

Summary of Emily of Deep Valley

To flesh out the book a little more Emily Webster, an orphan living with her grandfather, is not like the other girls her age in Deep Valley, Minnesota. The gulf between Emily and her classmates widens even more when they graduate from Deep Valley High in 1912. Emily longs to go off to college with everyone else, but she can’t leave her grandfather and it never even occurs to him that he might send her. Emily resigns herself to facing a “lost winter,” but soon decides to stop feeling sorry for herself. With a new program of study (both on her own and with a woman’s club in town), a growing interest in the Syrian immigrant community she can help, and a handsome new teacher at the high school to fill her days, Emily gains more than she ever dreamed. This is one of three non-Betsy-Tacy novels set in the same community of Deep Valley, a stand in for her home town of Mankato, Minnesota. I love this book because it really depicts the time period so well.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

In the Kitchen With Laura Project February 2014

October 12, 2014

trundlebedtales:

This one is just from this last February so I didn’t update it, but as the photos from it recently showed up in Facebook without proper attribution so it’s good to repeat it. It’s also next in line for the all time highest viewed posts. I hope everyone continues to enjoy it. :)

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

This the second in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about In the Kitchen With Laura. I want to thank my friend Susan Odom of Hillside Homestead (a 19th century immersion  experience bed and breakfast in Michigan) for the use of the photos I edited in this post. Most kitchens are organized so it’s hard to get a nice clear shot of the stove, but luckily hers isn’t. Odom gave me this additional information about her stove: “It is a Round Oak Range by the Round Oak Company of Dowagiac, Michigan. It is the style R9-20 and it was manufactured likely in 1908 or 1909. I don’t know what the R stands for, but the 9 is for the burner plates that are 9 inches in a diameter and the oven is 20 inches wide. There is a cool museum in Dowagiac that has…

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Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 6

October 10, 2014
Gene Stratton-Porter Recommendation

Gene Stratton-Porter Recommendation

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share June’s posted video.

This month they talk again with Monica Meehan Berg, who actually remembers her grandmother, Gene’s daughter Jeanette Porter gives more family stories. Video 6 is called “June 2014: A Family Anecdote with Monica Meehan Berg.”

It was originally published on June 15, 2014 and the Stratton Foundation commented on the video:
“At the 150th Birthday Celebration Gene Stratton-Porter Gala, Monica Meehan Berg shares a sweet story from her past about Janet Holmes with Doug Stratton. Monica is overwhelmed with the excitement of soon meeting with Janet after 45 plus years. This anecdote was too good not to be made into an episode for the GS-P Series because even 150 years later, Gene Stratton-Porter is still bringing family together.”

Berg recommends this booklet:

MacLean, David G. Gene Stratton-Porter: A Short Biography and Collector’s Guide to First Editions (With Recent Auction Prices). Decauter, IN: Americana Books, 1987. ISBN 0917902041

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Melissa Gilbert Book Tour

October 8, 2014
Melissa Gilbert Signing My Book

Melissa Gilbert Signing My Book

September 16, 2014,was the day Melissa Gilbert’s second book based on her connection to the Little House on the Prairie (TV Show) was released her My Prairie Cookbook: Memories and Frontier Food from My Little House to Yours. It’s a combination of 80 recipes from Gilbert’s personal collection and a series of short scrapbooks of behind the scenes stories and personal photos. She spent this day in Iowa, at the Cedar Rapids Public Library at 2 pm and at the Iowa City Public Library at 7 pm, with taking time for an hour long radio interview. I attended the Cedar Rapids Public Library show and roughly 250 people attended including some 30 who watched from a remote room. They sold out of the 95 cookbooks in 20 minutes.

From Iowa City Public Library

I saw the presentation at the Cedar Rapids Public Library live and got a copy of the recording from the Iowa City Public Library. Catch the repeats of her Iowa City visit on the local library’s public access television channel. I put together a news report on Gilbert’s visit to Cedar Rapids below.

Melissa Gilbert Visits the CRPL for The Prairie Cookbook Launch from Sarah Uthoff on Vimeo.

I watched a version of her presentation the US National Archives recently uploaded about Melissa Gilbert about her new Prairie Cookbook. Unfortunately both the host and Gilbert have some factual trouble near the beginning when talking about the real Laura and history. Then she steers into her own life and producing the show which is much more interesting. I especially like that she now refuses to sign copies of Laura’s books because as an author she thinks that is inappropriate, which I totally support. Gilbert also talks about her experience on Dancing With the Stars (which I hadn’t heard her do anywhere else). She talks a little bit about how the studio school was like a one-room school and how the other school children were mostly relatives of the cast and crew. Sean Penn and his brother were two of them because their father sometimes directed the show. She also answers what happened with Melissa and her brother Jonathan. She was asked about the Walnut Grove 40th Anniversary. Check out their press release which talks about the many Laura Ingalls Wilder connections with the National Archives including links and check out the video below:
http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2014/nr14-95.html

My Prairie Cookbook: Memories and Frontier Food from My Little House

In the US National Archives interview she mentions her appearance in Parade Magazine, here’s the link which includes one of her recipes:
http://parade.condenast.com/337314/walterscott/melissa-gilbert-dishes-on-her-favorite-recipes

Gilbert was also  interviewed on Talk of Iowa by Charity Nebbe. There is some repetition from the US National Archives video above, but also some great original stuff. My favorite bit is when she talks about the food on the show including KFC fried chicken and Dinty Moore Beef Stew.
http://iowapublicradio.org/post/actress-melissa-gilbert-life-after-little-house-prairie

UPDATE: If you couldn’t come to either of the shows in Iowa, check out this listing of her other stops around the country.
http://www.abramsbooks.com/myprairiecookbook/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Iowa One-Room School Workshop 2014

October 6, 2014
Exterior

Exterior

Once again it’s time for the annual one-room school workshop in Iowa. Every Fall a different location in Iowa is chosen and people from all over interested in one-room schools gather to learn more about one-room schools and tour area schools. While it’s in Iowa and hosted by Preservation Iowa, interested people from anywhere are welcome to register. The first day is presentation sessions (mostly brief highlights so there is always something different right around the corner). The second day is a tour of area one-room schools.

This year the workshop will be held in Kalona, Iowa at the Kalona Historical Village on Friday, October 10 and Saturday, October 11, 2014. The Kalona Historical Village is a multi-venue museum. They have a restored historic village, a building dedicated to local (especially Amish) history, a building of tractors and cars, and a quilt museum with a national reputation. Topics covered include: Amish one-room schools, Preserving schools through print and visual media, dealing with floods, finding country school antiques, among others.

Read the brochure and find registration information here:
Iowa Conf Brochure I-1 (Page 1)

Iowa Conf Brochure II-1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Preview The Songs

October 5, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I updated this when I put together the history of “Little House on the Prairie: The Musical” late last year, but it’s made up its way up to the most hits list. I hope you enjoy it.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Little House on the Prairie the Musical T-Shirt

Little House on the Prairie the Musical T-Shirt

Thanks to NPR, you can now hear some snippets of the “Little House on the Prairie” the musical, from the Guthrie. Also revealed is that a 40 city tour is currently being planned, but a prior Broadway run is still on the table.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=93644080

Learn more about the history of this production and listen to more of the songs on its website here:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/history-of-little-house-on-the-prairie-the-musical/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls…

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