Missing Murals of Iowa City

September 21, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I haven’t updated this post, but it coming up next on my reblog list reminds me I still have to get a photo of the new mural downtown and make a post of it. So look for it.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

When I was growing up there were three  major murals in Iowa City that I loved to look at.  The one I loved the best was in the children’s story time room at the Iowa City Public Library. The room was windowless in the addition to the original Carnegie of the ICPL. It was painted with children playing and anything that could be up in the air, kites, trees, birds, and ribbons. I really loved the mural and was truly sorry to lose it when the library moved into its new home (same location, but different building that it occupies now).

The second was downtown and had an optic effect where it when back and forth between a pattern of Native Americans and Eagles called the Black Hawk Mural that still has given its name to a small park next door. It was stripped off when the building was gentrified…

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Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 5

September 18, 2014
Embroidery of Limberlost House

Embroidery of Limberlost House

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share May’s posted video.

This month they go back to Stratton-Porter’s House in Rome City, Indiana. This month they are talking with Dave Fox who is one of the historians who helps run the Wildflower Woods park and preserving Gene’s history. He talks about how the Stratton family reconnecting with the site has been beneficial for both sides. Video 5 is called “May 2014: Preserving Gene’s History with Dave Fox.”

It was originally published on May 12, 2014 and the Stratton Foundation commented on the video:
“Thank you so much to Dave Fox, Wildflower Woods Site Manager, for his leadership in making it a wonderful place for the public to visit and learn about the story of Gene Stratton-Porter.  Thank you filmmaker, Amanda Trudell for telling the story!  I hope everyone will enjoy and share this episode and watch previous editions published in 2014 in this video series. 

Here’s a link to the information about the event they are talking about this August 16-17, 2014.
http://www.genestratton-porter.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=67:chautauqua-days&catid=10:events&Itemid=7

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Flood Recovery From a 500 Year Flood

September 14, 2014
Same mark looking towards Red Cedar River

Same mark looking towards Red Cedar River

I’ve been continuing to go back through my most popular posts and update them and republish them and I’ve just made my way down to the first post I made about the Flood of 2008 which inundated both Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, Iowa where I live and work. This is another post that looking back on it now,  I realize it really wouldn’t update very well, so I decided it was time for a round up and another check in instead.  The original post still holds the record for the number of hits to a single post on my blog in one day while people were searching for information.

http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/06/13/500-year-flood/

The after affects of the flood are still with us. Many buildings, businesses, and government agencies have been rebuilt and are now open again. In other places, especially the residential neighborhoods, it’s beginning to become clear that things aren’t going to come back. Many houses have been purchased by the city and have been demolished although you still get occasional reports where a house in the flood plain caught fire (a common event for awhile), many areas are now just empty instead of looking like a war zone. Arguments between the public and various government agencies have delayed rebuilding and flood wall construction and flood protection projects have caused ongoing problems where they have been built. Some places like the Paramont Theater have bounced back remarkably unharmed. Others like Hancher Theater and the National Czech and Slovak Library and Museum have been permanently moved and changed. Ushers Ferry, the historic village where I used to work, was especially hard hit. They lost many of their buildings and have refocused on smaller events and interactions, some very creative (like Zombie Apocolypse Survivor Camp), but much more focused on revenue generation than recreating and preserving a town. Effects both good and bad have been blamed on the flood, some with reason, some without. There are a lot of questions about how things were handled, especially as the city seems to be doubling down its bet on a casino that will likely never be built. We lost a lot in the flood, some individuals more than others, but we’re still here. This summer a hard rain came through causing some flooding and some continuing road closures, but nothing like 2008, even though it made everybody nervous as every hard rain is likely to for some years to come.

Blog Post Roundup

Below is a round up of my blog posts about the Great Iowa Flood of 2008. I left two out because of broken links. The information left in those two posts can be summed up that the following year the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art hosted an exhibit of flood and flood recovery photos and the conservation lab at the University of Iowa had put together some helpful videos that were hosted on the Gazette website for awhile.

Flood Update:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/06/14/flood-update/

Flood Update 2:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/06/16/flood-update-2/

Flood 2008 Damage:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/07/03/flood-2008-damage-update

Flood Recovery Information:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/07/06/flood-recovery-information/

Cedar Rapids Public Library Flood Update:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/07/23/crlibrary-flood-update-2008

Flood of 2008 6 Month Update:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/12/15/flood-6-month-update/

2010 Update on Flood of 2008:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/flood-of-june-2008/

Other Sources of Information

Find information about the Flood of 2008 from other sources.

Statistics of Flood:
http://mceer.buffalo.edu/infoservice/disasters/iowa-flood-news-statistics.asp

Although it looks like it hasn’t been updated since 2013, this looks like a good start page if you want to learn more details about the flood recovery:
http://www.cedar-rapids.org/city-news/flood-recovery-progress/pages/default.aspx

2008 Flood Coverage New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/13/us/13flood.html?_r=0

2013 5 Year Anniversary Coverage New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/12/us/iowa-city-rebuilds-from-flooding-but-remains-vulnerable.html?pagewanted=all

Advice What have we learned?

-Move stuff out don’t just sandbag.
-Make copies of things and share with relatives so no single copies of family photos, etc. will be lost.
-Don’t rent bank boxes below ground level. Some of the banks around here (including at least one flooded out) say contents are not insured on their safety deposit leases. Double check yours now.
-Don’t assume that the highest flood you can remember means that the highest flood there has ever been or ever will be.
-Realize that a 500 year flood won’t come every year.
-Don’t get too distracted with pretty, projects you think you can put your name on for government recovery.
-Even if everything works out exactly right, it will still be a long hard fought battle back and somethings are gone for good no matter how badly you wish otherwise.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Location of first Blind School (TV Show)

September 13, 2014

trundlebedtales:

It works out well the week of the official 40th anniversary of the Little House on the Prairie TV show. I checked all the links, but sadly the one of the house from “The Horse in the Grey Flannel Suit” is broken and I can’t find another image. So check out the movie itself and let me know what you think.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

I normally don’t post a lot about the NBC Little House on the Prairie TV show, but I do try to pass along things like shooting locations of episodes. I always like to know where things were filmed and it is often very difficult to find out. I just stumbled over one such location. For a long time I knew there was a Disney movie called The Horse in the Gray Flannel Suit which was in part a spoof of The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit movie. Recently I finally got a chance to watch it and I was shocked to see what was clearly the same exterior that they used for the first blind school the character of Mary attended on Little House on the Prairie. It was used as Dean Jones’s character’s house. So I jumped in to search and I tracked down that most of…

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Free Graph Paper

September 11, 2014

Every so often someone comes into the library while I’m working desperately looking for a piece of graph paper for a class. When they do I now have a solution, even though we don’t keep any in stock. The following websites let you print graph paper yourself on plain paper. Just the amount and size you need.

When You Can’t Find What You Need

I hunted these up not just for those occasional desperate souls, but also because when I started designing my own cross-stitching designs all I could find in the story was 1/4 inch by 1/4 inch which would render a pattern more than twice as big as the final form of the piece I was designing. It was cumbersome and a pain to work with, but after striking out on finding a ready supply of smaller stuff close to hand I went on line and following suggestions ran across the following two websites.

Print Out Your Own Graph Paper

Under the heading of Simpler below is the pre-set 1/4 inch standard graph paper for my favorite website and a second website that just does the basic. Take your choice. Under the heading of more complex you are given options to adjust the graph paper to whatever unusual requirements you might have. Also on this website you’ll find the ability to print out college ruled paper, kids handwriting practice paper, etc.

More complex (Ignore the big red download button in the ad if it pops up, you want to click on the drawing of the paper you want)

http://www.incompetech.com/graphpaper/

Simpler

http://www.incompetech.com/graphpaper/plain/

http://www.printablepaper.net/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Danbury CT Update

September 9, 2014
Rose's House in Danbury from Road

Rose’s House in Danbury from Road

As many of you know Laura’s daughter Rose Wilder Lane lived for a good chunk of years on what was originally a small farm outside Danbury, Connecticut. The neighborhood grew up around her, complete with a church that would later host one of her memorial services. Today it’s in a nice neighborhood full of older large homes and inconvenient driveways. While the location of the home has long been known, and photos of it graced articles Rose wrote about remodeling your home, its current owner has not been consistently open to Wilder visitors, peppering a few offered tours with often refusing to respond even to tell you, you weren’t welcome. That may change. The home is now being offered for sale. There is sometimes talk of turning it into a museum, but I don’t think there would be a long term local interest and the furnishings that would have made that easy to do have been scattered amongst the existing museums. My long cherished hope would be that it would be purchased by someone looking to do a bed and breakfast. Not only would it be in a great location for that, I’m sure many Wilder fans would be chomping to spend the night. I hope someone like that buys it.

The Cottonwood Tree blog dug up the realtor offering the home for sale and go permission to post photos on her blog of the house. It’s remarkable how much it still looks like Rose’s house, down to the brick floor she insisted on in the kitchen. I’d love to know if they still have the hang from the wall toilet and if they ever fixed the door into one room off the staircase that had a bad case of look out for that first step it’s a lo0-loo, but I’m grateful to get a peek inside Rose’s home.

Check it out on The Cottonwood Tree:
http://thecottonwoodtree.wordpress.com/2014/08/15/a-virtual-tour-of-rose-wilder-lanes-former-danbury-home/

Sandra Hume posted this link with more on Beyond Little House’s Facebook page:
http://m.newstimes.com/business/article/House-once-owned-by-daughter-of-Laura-Ingalls-5722508.php?cmpid=fb-mobile

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Amelia Bloomer’s Grave

September 7, 2014

trundlebedtales:

This continues to be a post of interest so other people must be looking for Bloomer’s grave as well. I hope you will get a chance to visit it the next time you visit western Iowa, eastern Nebraska.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Road to Amelia Bloomer's Grave

Road to Amelia Bloomer’s Grave

I picked up the habit in childhood of visiting famous people’s graves. Later as I grew more interested in Wilder, my mother starting saying that every vacation we ended up in a cemetery looking for dead Wilders (I pointed out that sometimes it was dead Ingalls, etc., but she remained unconvinced.

During my class in Council Bluffs this summer we got to stop at the Fairview Cemetery. Although I hadn’t done enough pre-work for this trip (really I didn’t, I literally just found out something I should have known about Tabor before I went this week – I’ll share soon), but there was a sign that said Amelia Bloomer was buried somewhere inside. I knew Amelia Bloomer was just one of the leading suffragettes that lived in Iowa, but I hadn’t realized she was buried in Council Bluffs. With no further help from any special…

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Wilder Farm From The Air

September 5, 2014

I wanted to make sure everyone got to see this video footage of the Wilder farm in Malone/Burke, New York. It really stumped me at first because while it’s too smooth to be a hand carried camera it was too bumpy to be either a camera on rails, a boom, or a professional steady cam camera man. (Especially note the strange hesitations before they fly through the building. When I posted this confusion on Facebook I was took it was shot with a miniature camera attached to a remote control helicopter type vehicle.  In other words, they used something like this. That made me immediately want one. How fun would that be!

Recreated Wilder Barns

Recreated Wilder Barns

There aren’t any spoken words or soundtrack so this might help you figure out what you’re seeing. Strangely it avoids the house at first and the new one-room school, but it gives you a nice overview of the reconstructed barns. Then we enter through one of the doors of the big barn and follow back through it to the walled in barnyard behind it. The big barn open at left should be the first one they flew through. Cut back above the barns and we get a good look at this walled in barnyard. Then we reverse our path through the barn and come out and get a quick glimpse of the house. Then cut to entrance through the door that’s on the far left of the barns into the carriage and sleigh storage area. Attention finally turns to the house. After that we get a beautiful shot of the barns from the field right behind the barnyard and that’s it. The Music is from Sleeping Giant Records and is a folk song recorded in 2001.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mentions August 2014

September 3, 2014
Sarah Presenting Around the Next Bend

Sarah Presenting Around the Next Bend

Our mentions posts are round ups of articles and mentions of Sarah Uthoff or Trundlebed Tales in the media from the previous month, plus sometimes some bonuses that I’ve just come across from earlier months.

The press release from the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library on “In the Kitchen With Laura.”
http://www.hoover.archives.gov/pressreleases/Labor%20Day%20LIW%20PR.pdf

I listed this last month, but since the event is still coming up, here it is again. Pepin Laura Days has launched a new website. They have included a PDF of me.
Sarah Uthoff

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

September 2014 Laura Ingalls Wilder Events

September 1, 2014

IMG_0176July and September tend to be the biggest months for Laura Ingalls Wilder related events around the country. If I’ve missed one please let me know.

Pepin WI

Laura Days – Sept. 13 and 14, 2014
http://www.lauradays.org

Independence KS

The annual fall Lamplight on the Prairie evening guided tour will take place on September 27th.  Lamplight on the Prairie takes you on a guided lamplight tour of our site with a special twist- at each tour stop you will meet the people from the pages of Laura’s books and Kansas history.  Our living history reenactors will bring history to life before your eyes.  Tours begin every half an hour and are limited to 15 people per tour.

Tickets can be purchased online  or in their gift shop in person beginning September 2, 2014.  We will launch an event page for Lamplight on September 2nd with the link to ticket sales and additional information about the event.

Mansfield MO

Laura’s Memories Pageant – Sept. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 2014

Wilder Days Sept. 19-20, 2014 Laura Historian William T. Anderson will be speaking and Lucy Lee Flippin (Eliza Jane Wilder from the NBC TV Show)
http://www.laurasmemories.com

Malone/Burke NY

Annual Harvest Festival & Civil War Living History Encampment Sept. 27 & 28, 2014

Herbert Hoover Presidential Library

Good news, I’m returning as speaker!

Laura Ingalls Wilder Remembered –In the Kitchen With Laura – Sept. 1, 2014 11 am and 2 pm
With Prairie Walks lead by Park Rangers at 9:30 am and 3:00 pm
http://www.hoover.archives.gov/pressreleases/Labor%20Day%20LIW%20PR.pdf

Other Iowa

Melissa Gilbert’s Book Tour has come to Iowa. Come see her on Tuesday, September 16, 2014.
– 2:00 pm Cedar Rapids Public Library
http://newbobooks.com/events
7:00pm to 8:00pm at the Iowa City Public Library.
http://arts.uiowa.edu/events/live-prairie-lights-melissa-gilbert/2014-09-16

If you can’t come to either of the shows in Iowa, check out this listing of her other stops around the country.
http://www.abramsbooks.com/myprairiecookbook/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.


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