Legacy Libraries

Legacy Library logo from Library Thing

Library Thing

Library Thing is a social media website that lets you create a personal library catalog. It’s so helpful in back that some extremely small libraries use it as THEIR catalog. Basically you get a membership (free and paid have different levels of benefits) that let you copy catalog your books from various sources. You can also find other people’s lists. I must admit, even though I probably should, I really haven’t done anything more than look around Library Thing even though it’s been around since 2005.

Legacy Libraries

Today (July 24, 2019) I tripped over a tweet that directed me to their Legacy Libraries. These are lists of what books famous people had in their libraries. I’m not sure what their sources are. I looked up Harry S. Truman because I know his wonderful National Historic Site had put together a list of what books he owned (why don’t more museums do this?) I had to try two different ways to go into find it. So you may want to just scroll the main list or go in by category instead of date because that’s how I found it. Find a list of Legacy Libraries.

Current Categories

Here are links to the current categories and how they sort them.

They list:

P.S. Since I mentioned the Harry S. Truman historic site above, I want to especially point you to their Facebook page which is one of the best done I’ve ever seen.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,   watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,  look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook ,   Twitter ,  LinkedIn ,  SlideShare,  and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

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On the Way Home Live Tweet Part 2

Four copies of different versions of On the Way Home
On the Way Home Editions

We continue my embedded tweets from my 2018 On the Way Home livetweet. For each tweet click on the body of the tweet to the thread (the connected string of tweets) will open with that day’s tweets. Sadly clicking “See Sarah Uthoff’s Other Tweets” will NOT get you to the right place, it just takes you to my most current tweets. Catch up on Part 1.

Again these are embedded tweets.  I used gifs within the Twitter system and none of them are housed here, they are in the tweets I’ve linked to.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs,  schedule one yourself,  watchher videos,  listen to her podcast,    look at her photos, and find her on    Facebook ,   Twitter ,  LinkedIn ,  SlideShare,  and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

On the Way Home Live Tweet Part 1

Four copies of different versions of On the Way Home
On the Way Home Editions

Last year, inspired by Civil War Fangirl’s Twitter account live streams of Civil War Battles, I read On the Way Home day by day. On the Way is a published version of Laura Ingalls Wilder, her husband Almanzo, and their daughter Rose’s trip from DeSmet, South Dakota to Mansfield, Missouri where they will live the rest of their lives. The published version adds an introduction and an afterward based on an adult Rose’s memories of the trip and the time around it. She also edited some of the text for whatever reason, for example minimizing the role of the Cooley’s in the trip when it was basically their trip and the Wilders just came along.

Embedded Tweets

In the post below and the second part, I went through and copied those daily tweets locations and embedded them in. This might make the page take awhile to load. Please be patient. The tweets were threaded (connected together) by the day and the first tweet of each can look like it’s repeating, but it isn’t. Click on the body of the Tweet to open that day’s thread. Clicking on See More Tweets just takes you to the Trundlebed Tales Twitter homepage. For some reason two of the days wouldn’t thread properly so I added their tweets individually although it did add the first tweet of the day above each and every one. I tried to get all the tweets, but I’m not guaranteeing these are all considering the way Twitter was behaving, backtrack through the #OnTheWayHome hashtag to July 2018 to make sure you’ve seen them all.

Since I so enjoyed the way Civil War Fangirl used light-hearted gifs in her tweets on a serious subject, I added some to mine. Those Gifs are part of the Twitter system, but show here through the embedding. I’m assuming Twitter has cleared the Gifs for use. They aren’t captured here just redirected.

And now my reactions to reading On the Way Home – July 17th 1894/2018

August 1st has a mislink. I did NOT mean to link to the Isaac Asimov cartoon, but enjoy it anyway!

August 13th seems not to have threaded correctly so I’m adding them individually.

Should be eXciting, sorry.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs,  schedule one yourself,  watchher videos,  listen to her podcast,    look at her photos, and find her on    Facebook ,   Twitter ,  LinkedIn ,  SlideShare,  and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote Do you compose all your own music

In the August 8, 2018 issue of the UK’s The Guardian carried a feature on fanfic (fiction written by fans of a particular movie, TV show, comic book series, book, etc.). I must admit that I write and read a bit of fanfic myself (honestly there is A LOT of bad stuff out there in fanfic land dark, nasty, and poorly written, but some of it is kind of awesome). I honestly think it can help people who produce it, even if nobody else wants to read it. Frankly I always felt like I was kind of wasting my time, but I feel MUCH better about it after reading this piece. Go on. Read it. I’ll wait. (Confused by what I mean by fanfic? Check out my description in my review of Star Trek (2009).)

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/aug/08/fanfiction-fifty-shades-star-trek-harry-potter

The quote I’ve pulled out is actually a paragraph but it is such a great metaphor I had to use it all. It’s true you do use other people’s music and interpret when you play an instrument. It’s so apt a comparison.

[Naomi] Novik scorns the idea that published authors should turn their back on fanfiction. She recalls being on a panel where one member said he couldn’t understand why someone would waste their time writing it over an original work:

“I said, ‘Have you ever played an instrument?’

He was like, ‘Yeah, I play piano’.

I said, ‘So, do you compose all your own music?’”

The article also talks about using already established characters as training wheels for learning writing skills with a pre-built community who wants to talk about it, compares how classic works often “borrowed” characters and situations from earlier works in the vein of fanfic (just by people you have to read in Literature class), and – this is something else I hadn’t thought of before – is looked down on as pink collar.

Fanfic Primarily Women

Fanfic is devalued in part because it is primarily created and read by women.

There is an undercurrent of misogyny in mainstream criticism of fanfiction, which is widely accepted to be dominated by women; one census of 10,500 AO3 users found that 80% of the users identified as female, with more users identified as genderqueer (6%) than male (4%). Novik has spent a good deal of time fighting against fanfiction’s stigma because she feels it is “an attack on women’s writing, specifically an attack on young women’s writing and the kind of stories that young women like to tell”. Which is not to say that young women only want to write about romance: “I think,” Novik says, “that [the popularity of fanfiction amongst women is] not unconnected to the lack of young women protagonists who are not romantic interests.”

Honestly, except for copyright I’d copy the whole thing. It’s just brilliant, read it.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Readers in SPACE!

I just found out about a cool program thanks to a post on Scary Mommy. According to her, “The concept was developed by Patricia Tribe, the former director of education at Space Center Houston, and Alvin Drew, the first NASA astronaut to read a story in space for the program, during the final mission of the space shuttle Discovery. The pair were looking to find a way to encourage reading among kids while also promoting STEM education, and landed on the idea of having on-duty astronauts reading science-based kids’ books, gravity-free.”

Cover of Rosie Revere Engineer

During their space missions, astronauts tape themselves reading books. You can find these books read in zero gravity on their website, Story Time from Space. Here’s an example. Check out Rosie Revere, Engineer as read by Astronaut Kate Rubins. Rubins is a veteran of two spacewalks and was the first to sequence DNA in space. Be sure to use their website to access the videos. While they have a dedicated YouTube channel they don’t seem to have tied all of the videos into it.

They expanded the program adding video demonstrations of experiments in space. (Use the Science Time Videos drop-down to select the videos.) Their lessons are alligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core to encourage their use in lessons and events. Check back to see what they add next!

P.S. Yes, I totally named this post after PIGS IN SPACE! from The Muppet Show.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast,  look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook ,  Twitter ,  LinkedIn ,  SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mentions January February 2019

Wagon in Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Pepin WI
Wagon Diorama at Pepin Museum

I combined the January and February mentions posts this time. Even though there isn’t much brand new here, I did find a couple of gems to add to the list.

About Me

I have one that referenced me.

  • Elzenga, Nicole. “The Dying Art of Letter Writing.” Redwood Gazette. January 3, 2019. p. 4.

By Me

I got one article published in Kirkwood Community College’s student newspaper, the Kirkwood Communique.

I also found some full text online versions of a couple of book reviews I’d done quite awhile back.

Cited In

I also found an online version of a book I’m cited in.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Jackanory

I love it when I find a bit of Laura Ingalls Wilder tucked in an odd corner. This one seems extra odd. From 1965 to 1996 the BBC produced a children’s TV series called Jackanory. (It’s from the BBC’s children’s department about that same time as Doctor Who, so even though I’ve never seen Jackanory I’m quite ready to believe it was amazingly cool.)

4 covers of British edition 2 Little House in the Big Woods and 2 Little House on the Prairie
British Editions of the Little House Books

I found this blog post talking about this show:

Out In The Dark

Jackanory was a daily weekday series where they read book across days. The host was Red Shiveley. Original producer Joy Whitby would have the set decorated to the style of the book. Special, original illustrations were provided by Mina Martinez who was frequently used by the BBC.  The music for this span of episodes was provided by Jack Fallon, a jazz violinist, and Rick Jones, a singer.

“Broadcast by BBC1 on Tuesday 25th October 1966, the two hundredth edition of Jackanory was nothing more significant or celebratory than “Out In The Dark,” the second of a five part adaptation of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s 1932 autobiographical novel The Little House In The Big Woods.”

They don’t have a recording of any of the Laura episodes, but this blog post does a great job of explaining it what it was and you never know. They still occasionally find another episode of Doctor Who, maybe the Jackanory version of Little House in the Big Woods will turn up sometime.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.