Quote Do you compose all your own music

In the August 8, 2018 issue of the UK’s The Guardian carried a feature on fanfic (fiction written by fans of a particular movie, TV show, comic book series, book, etc.). I must admit that I write and read a bit of fanfic myself (honestly there is A LOT of bad stuff out there in fanfic land dark, nasty, and poorly written, but some of it is kind of awesome). I honestly think it can help people who produce it, even if nobody else wants to read it. Frankly I always felt like I was kind of wasting my time, but I feel MUCH better about it after reading this piece. Go on. Read it. I’ll wait. (Confused by what I mean by fanfic? Check out my description in my review of Star Trek (2009).)

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/aug/08/fanfiction-fifty-shades-star-trek-harry-potter

The quote I’ve pulled out is actually a paragraph but it is such a great metaphor I had to use it all. It’s true you do use other people’s music and interpret when you play an instrument. It’s so apt a comparison.

[Naomi] Novik scorns the idea that published authors should turn their back on fanfiction. She recalls being on a panel where one member said he couldn’t understand why someone would waste their time writing it over an original work:

“I said, ‘Have you ever played an instrument?’

He was like, ‘Yeah, I play piano’.

I said, ‘So, do you compose all your own music?’”

The article also talks about using already established characters as training wheels for learning writing skills with a pre-built community who wants to talk about it, compares how classic works often “borrowed” characters and situations from earlier works in the vein of fanfic (just by people you have to read in Literature class), and – this is something else I hadn’t thought of before – is looked down on as pink collar.

Fanfic Primarily Women

Fanfic is devalued in part because it is primarily created and read by women.

There is an undercurrent of misogyny in mainstream criticism of fanfiction, which is widely accepted to be dominated by women; one census of 10,500 AO3 users found that 80% of the users identified as female, with more users identified as genderqueer (6%) than male (4%). Novik has spent a good deal of time fighting against fanfiction’s stigma because she feels it is “an attack on women’s writing, specifically an attack on young women’s writing and the kind of stories that young women like to tell”. Which is not to say that young women only want to write about romance: “I think,” Novik says, “that [the popularity of fanfiction amongst women is] not unconnected to the lack of young women protagonists who are not romantic interests.”

Honestly, except for copyright I’d copy the whole thing. It’s just brilliant, read it.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Advertisements

Readers in SPACE!

I just found out about a cool program thanks to a post on Scary Mommy. According to her, “The concept was developed by Patricia Tribe, the former director of education at Space Center Houston, and Alvin Drew, the first NASA astronaut to read a story in space for the program, during the final mission of the space shuttle Discovery. The pair were looking to find a way to encourage reading among kids while also promoting STEM education, and landed on the idea of having on-duty astronauts reading science-based kids’ books, gravity-free.”

Cover of Rosie Revere Engineer

During their space missions, astronauts tape themselves reading books. You can find these books read in zero gravity on their website, Story Time from Space. Here’s an example. Check out Rosie Revere, Engineer as read by Astronaut Kate Rubins. Rubins is a veteran of two spacewalks and was the first to sequence DNA in space. Be sure to use their website to access the videos. While they have a dedicated YouTube channel they don’t seem to have tied all of the videos into it.

They expanded the program adding video demonstrations of experiments in space. (Use the Science Time Videos drop-down to select the videos.) Their lessons are alligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core to encourage their use in lessons and events. Check back to see what they add next!

P.S. Yes, I totally named this post after PIGS IN SPACE! from The Muppet Show.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast,  look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook ,  Twitter ,  LinkedIn ,  SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mentions January February 2019

Wagon in Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Pepin WI
Wagon Diorama at Pepin Museum

I combined the January and February mentions posts this time. Even though there isn’t much brand new here, I did find a couple of gems to add to the list.

About Me

I have one that referenced me.

  • Elzenga, Nicole. “The Dying Art of Letter Writing.” Redwood Gazette. January 3, 2019. p. 4.

By Me

I got one article published in Kirkwood Community College’s student newspaper, the Kirkwood Communique.

I also found some full text online versions of a couple of book reviews I’d done quite awhile back.

Cited In

I also found an online version of a book I’m cited in.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Jackanory

I love it when I find a bit of Laura Ingalls Wilder tucked in an odd corner. This one seems extra odd. From 1965 to 1996 the BBC produced a children’s TV series called Jackanory. (It’s from the BBC’s children’s department about that same time as Doctor Who, so even though I’ve never seen Jackanory I’m quite ready to believe it was amazingly cool.)

4 covers of British edition 2 Little House in the Big Woods and 2 Little House on the Prairie
British Editions of the Little House Books

I found this blog post talking about this show:

Out In The Dark

Jackanory was a daily weekday series where they read book across days. The host was Red Shiveley. Original producer Joy Whitby would have the set decorated to the style of the book. Special, original illustrations were provided by Mina Martinez who was frequently used by the BBC.  The music for this span of episodes was provided by Jack Fallon, a jazz violinist, and Rick Jones, a singer.

“Broadcast by BBC1 on Tuesday 25th October 1966, the two hundredth edition of Jackanory was nothing more significant or celebratory than “Out In The Dark,” the second of a five part adaptation of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s 1932 autobiographical novel The Little House In The Big Woods.”

They don’t have a recording of any of the Laura episodes, but this blog post does a great job of explaining it what it was and you never know. They still occasionally find another episode of Doctor Who, maybe the Jackanory version of Little House in the Big Woods will turn up sometime.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

The Long Winter on Wisconsin Public Radio

I’d like to thank Constance Spasojevich for letting me know about this.

A Chapter A Day

You will still find interesting local shows scattered among the radio stations of the Midwest. One of these is A Chapter A Day from Wisconsin Public Radio. It’s a simple enough concept. They find an interesting book and read a chapter every day.

According to their website:

Started in 1931, “Chapter a Day” is WPR’s longest running program. Jim Fleming, Norman Gilliland, Susan Sweeney and Michele Good read a chapter from a book for a half hour each weekday. Genres are predominately contemporary and range from works of fiction, history and biography.  “Chapter A Day” can be heard weekdays on the Ideas Network at 12:30 p.m. and 11 p.m.

The Long Winter

Of all the “Little House” books the one most frequently selected for set time, single shot production is The Long Winter. Once again it has been selected.

Cover of Long Winter

The Long Winter will be read Monday, December 3 through Friday, December 14, 2018. This recording was read by Carol Cowan in 1990.

Not Much Time

Although they have an archive of past readings, it looks like older broadcasts are only a list of what was read with a book description. They say, “Due to publisher and copyright restrictions, audio archives are only available for one week after a book is read on the air.” So you don’t have much time to check it out.

While they last, here are the archives. Give a listen! This isn’t the Cherry Jones recordings, but a local production – with permission.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

All Iowa Reads Finalists

Things are going a little differently with All Iowa Reads this year. Since next year the Iowa Library Association is going to be holding a joint conference with Nebraska Library Association, they are also combining their All Reads programs. (In an All Reads program a certain geographic area or organization picks one book that everyone is supposed to read and then hold events for their discussion, etc.) Since Nebraska holds a separate event to announce theirs the All Iowa Reads selection for 2019 announcement, normally held at the Iowa Library Association, is being delayed. In the meantime they recommend these titles.

Teen and Kids

While the adult title is being delayed both the Teen and Kid titles have been announced. They are a relatively new addition to the program rolled out in 2018.

Teen Award

A Land of Permanent Goodbyes by Atia Abawi

In a country ripped apart by war, Tareq lives with his big and loving family . . . until the bombs strike. His city is in ruins. His life is destroyed. And those who have survived are left to figure out their uncertain future. Tareq’s family knows that to continue to stay alive, they must leave. As they travel as refugees from Syria to Turkey to Greece, facing danger at every turn, Tareq must find the resilience and courage to complete his harrowing journey.

Kids Award

Amina’s Voice by Hena Khan

Amina has never been comfortable in the spotlight. She is happy just hanging out with her best friend, Soojin. Except now that she’s in middle school everything feels different. Soojin is suddenly hanging out with Emily, one of the “cool” girls in the class, and even talking about changing her name to something more “American.” Does Amina need to start changing too? Or hiding who she is to fit in? While Amina grapples with these questions, she is devastated when her local mosque is vandalized.

5 Finalists

While they are holding off on saying who is the winner, they did give us five finalists that all sound like good reads too. In the order they were announced:

Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones

In 1929, in the blue-collar city of Portsmouth, Ohio, a company built a swimming pool the size of a football field; named Dreamland, it became the vital center of the community. Now, addiction has devastated Portsmouth, as it has hundreds of small rural towns and suburbs across America–addiction like no other the country has ever faced. How that happened is the riveting story of Dreamland.

The Homesman: A Novel by  Glendon Swarthout 

The Homesman is a devastating story of early pioneers in 1850s American West. It celebrates the ones we hear nothing of: the brave women whose hearts and minds were broken by a life of bitter hardship. A “homesman” must be found to escort a handful of them back East to a sanitarium. When none of the county’s men steps up, the job falls to Mary Bee Cuddy—ex-teacher, spinster, indomitable and resourceful. Brave as she is, Mary Bee knows she cannot succeed alone. The only companion she can find is the low-life claim jumper George Briggs. Thus begins a trek east, against the tide of colonization, against hardship, Indian attacks, ice storms, and loneliness—a timeless classic told in a series of tough, fast-paced adventures.

Interior Places by Lisa Knopp

A collection of essays embracing nonfiction from memoir and biography to travel writing and natural history, Interior Places offers a curiously detailed group photograph of the Midwest’s interior landscape. Here is an essay about the origin, history, and influence of corn. Here we find an exploration of a childhood meeting with Frederick Leopold, youngest brother of the great naturalist Aldo. Here also are a chronicle of the 146-year alliance between Burlington, Iowa, and the Burlington Route (later the CB&O, the BN, and finally, the BNSF) and a pilgrimage to Amelia Earhart’s Kansas hometown. Whether writing about the lives of two of P. T. Barnum’s giants or the “secret” nuclear weapons plant in southeastern Iowa, about hunger in Lincoln, Nebraska, or bird banding on the Platte River, Knopp captures the inner character of the Midwest as Nature dictates it, people live it, and history reveals it.

This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm by Ted Genoways

The family farm lies at the heart of our national identity, yet its future is in peril. Rick Hammond grew up on a small ranch, and for forty years he has raised cattle and crops on his wife’s fifth-generation homestead in York County, Nebraska, in hopes of passing it on to their four children. But as the handoff nears, their small family farm―and their entire way of life―are under siege. Rising corporate ownership of land and livestock is forcing small farmers to get bigger and bigger, assuming more debt and more risk. At the same time, after nearly a decade of record-high corn and soybean prices, the bottom has dropped out of the markets, making it ever harder for small farmers to shoulder their loans. All the while, the Hammonds are confronted by encroaching pipelines, groundwater depletion, climate change, and shifting trade policies. Far from an isolated refuge beyond the reach of global events, the family farm is increasingly at the crossroads of emerging technologies and international detente. Following the Hammonds from harvest to harvest, Ted Genoways explores this rapidly changing landscape of small, traditional farming operations, mapping as it unfolds day to day.

A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor by Joe Starita 

On March 14, 1889, Susan La Flesche Picotte received her medical degree―becoming the first Native American doctor in U.S. history. She earned her degree thirty-one years before women could vote and thirty-five years before Indians could become citizens in their own country.

By age twenty-six, this fragile but indomitable Native woman became the doctor to her tribe. Overnight, she acquired 1,244 patients scattered across 1,350 square miles of rolling countryside with few roads. Her patients often were desperately poor and desperately sick―tuberculosis, small pox, measles, influenza―families scattered miles apart, whose last hope was a young woman who spoke their language and knew their customs.

This is the story of an Indian woman who effectively became the chief of an entrenched patriarchal tribe, the story of a woman who crashed through thick walls of ethnic, racial and gender prejudice, then spent the rest of her life using a unique bicultural identity to improve the lot of her people―physically, emotionally, politically, and spiritually.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Library Rescue What Jon Taffer Taught Me About Libraries

Screenshot of Bar Rescue HomepageJon Taffer is well known for his research of bar science on TV and in his publications. Although in many ways bars and libraries are different, they have some common goals of wanting to encourage people to walk in and to create an experience so they’ll want to come back. His methods regarding matching your neighborhood, having a consistent experience, signage, displays, and training, are all things that could also apply to libraries. This session will share examples of how libraries could and are using the ideas of bar science.

During the Iowa Library Association 2018 conference, I’m rolling out a brand new program applying what Jon Taffer teaches about bars to libraries. Look for me at a conference near you.

Handouts

Main Handout – JonTafferHO

Secret Shopper Checklist for the Library

ILAPressRelease

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.