Burr Oak Laura Days 2012

Check out this video from Burr Oak about their Laura Days back in 2012.

Sarah's Notebook

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The Laura Ingalls Wilder Park and Museum in Burr Oak, Iowa has put out a video about their most recent event. Put the last weekend in June on your calendar for next year.

I’d like to point out that they are wrong about the games. None of these are games Laura would have played, although they are old-fashioned.

Also, they really should have taken a few second shots of some things. Like when a door opens up and somebody starts to come out and hurriedly backs in, stop shooting and start over. However, it does a nice job showing what the event is like and I think it will make you want to visit next time. I’m especially glad to see they had a stagecoach back which I think is great thing to get a photo of the stagecoach in front of the Masters Hotel. Looking forward to next year.

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Farming: Then And Now – An online agriculture lesson

I recently took a class on farming present and past and one of the assignments was to create an online version of the lesson. I chose to do it as blog post. Please come along and join the activities. It’s based on this lesson plan. It assumes Zoom meetings that have groups pre-set up. We won’t have those available, but please watch and join in the rest of the activities.


Segment 1

Farm Bureau: “Farming today is just as important as it was in the past. Farmers have always produced food, but their methods of production change throughout time. Machines make it easier and more efficient to plant, care for, and harvest crops. Machines do a lot of work that people and animals used to do, and they do it faster and more accurately. Before tractors, farmers mainly used horses to help with difficult work. Once tractors became economically feasible for each farmer to own, the number of horses decreased and the number of tractors increased. Farmers today continue to produce the food needed by humans and livestock, as well as producing other resources, just as they did in the past, but with new technology and innovation.”

Although the goals are the same farm life is very different from what it was 100 years ago. In the survey below each question starts with something that would have been done in the past with the second option being something that is done in the present. Complete the survey and see if you’d rather be a farmer now or then!

E-mail me at info@trundlebedtales.com when you’d rather be a farmer.


On Friday afternoon at 2pm we’ll be doing a live Zoom class meeting. We’ll be going through the presentation “Iowa Agriculture: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.”

After the presentation you’ll be put in Friday group rooms on Zoom to discuss and fill out a Know-Want to Know-Learned diagram. You can draw it and scan it or type it up. Everyone will be expected to turn in the diagram. E-mail it to info@trundlebedtales.com


A farmer’s job is to manage a farm. They may own everything on the farm, they may work for the owner, or they may be contracting growing. Contract growing is owning the farm, but raising things on contract for someone else. There are farmers who raise acres of crops. Crops are plants grown to be sold for use as food or other products. There are also farmers who focus on livestock. Livestock are animals raised on a farm to be sold as food and to make many other products that you use.

The chores or everyday jobs that have to be done on a farm depends on the time of year and what is raised on the farm. On farms that raise crops farmers often use machines that do particular jobs to help them get the most yield. At harvest time, machines like combines are used. A combine gathers a crop and cuts, sorts, and cleans the plant that is being harvested. Yields are the amount produced on a farm each year. Yields are given as per acre. Each acre is 43,560 square feet (a little smaller than a football field).

In your groups we’re going to watch the video and then work with your group to come up with definitions for these terms. Fill them out on the Google doc.

Read: Farming Then & Now by Scott Foresman (We’re going to have to look into how we can share it. We might have to do it live on Zoom.)

Segment 2

Before the next live Zoom watch these 2 videos.

Next up is a vocabulary live quiz. We’re going to have a list of people’s names and vocabulary terms. There will be two sets of each vocabulary word. The instructor will draw one student and one vocabulary word. We’ll go through all the vocabulary twice.

Download two circle Venn Diagram or draw one. Look at comparing farming yesterday and today. As part of our live Zoom we’ll share screen and go through the photo album looking to identify farming yesterday and today. Use this website to explore and help fill out your Venn Diagram.

During this time’s Zoom session, we’ll also bring in farmer Myron XXXXX to answer questions about his farming operation today and how it has changed over the years.

Whether you decide you’d rather be a farmer in the past or in the present, write a 3 paragraph answer explaining your choice.

  • Paragraph 1 : Which answer you’d pick and why you didn’t pick the other option.
  • Paragraph 2: Reasons you answered the way you did.
  • Paragraph 3: Summing up why you feel the way you do.

After you write your reply, e-mail it to info@trundlebedtales.com

Check out these Agriculture Fun Facts.

Find the standards for this lesson at the bottom of this lesson plan.


I hope you have a enjoyed this lesson and found it useful to learn more about agriculture in Iowa.

Mentions June 2020

Sarah in her 1890s dress in set up
Me in the set up

Mentions continue to be slow. If you don’t have speaking engagements, you don’t make a lot of news. I do have one this month. The blog Ups and Downs of Family History V2.0 featured me as their Blog of the Week. I appreciate the shout out. They seem to be a mix of topics blog, too. Give it a look.

Smith, Paul. “Trundlebed Tales – Featured Blogger of the Week June 12, 2020.” Ups and Downs of Family History V2.0, https://upsdownsfamilyhistory.wordpress.com/2020/06/12/kaitlin-h-powell-featured-blogger-of-the-week-june-5-2020 Accessed June 13, 2020.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help?  Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at her photos, and find her  on   Facebook ,   Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,     SlideShare,   and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Publishing Industry Handout

Looking back on my presentation about book design and the publishing industry.

Sarah's Notebook

UPDATED July 1 2020: This was originally published getting ready for my presentation about book design and the publishing industry and their effect on the “Little House” books. Normally I do a PDF handout, but this one I just used the text as the blog post. However, I just copied it out of the paper copy so I kept it short. My personal rule is that any presentation handout shouldn’t be longer than 2 pages so that people can easily share the information when they return home. That limitation lead to briefly mentioning some things and leaving out some people like Mildred Boyle. I think though this gives a solid baseline on publishing the “Little House” books. As part of this update I’m going to bold the names of people. I did NOT update to the current MLA style.

Publishing Industry

“The Little House” books, the classic children’s series by

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BBC Wonders About Anne

Revisiting Anne

Sarah's Notebook

L.M. Montgomery Shelf

In honor of the L.M. Montgomery Institute meeting this week on Prince Edward Island, I wanted to do a post. I’d be saving this one. BBC News took a look at the fans who come to Prince Edward Island. I understand this impulse a lot more than the reporter does, since it was my high school graduation present to go and visit PEI. It was a wonderful time and I so want to get back. It really was like stepping into an Anne book and really gave me a feeling of being like home.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/fast_track/9722594.stm

UPDATED June 30 2020: Once again it’s right after the L.M. Montgomery conference, but this year because of on-going pandemic precautions it went online so I got to attend. Look for this year’s tweets under the hashtag #LMMI2020.

The link still gets you to the page the article was on, but it had a video…

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Quote: “A Student’s Zip Code”

Taking another look at a great quote! Should a student’s future be decided by their zip code?

Sarah's Notebook

From time to time I like to share a quote that I come across. I found this one in material that I read for an AEA class, Introduction to the Online Learner. Really it’s one of the most powerful statements about education I have come across in along time. There are things beyond providing a knowledge based or even a critical thinking style education that schools provide, but in an educational climate where schools are constantly being challenged to do more with less and the only answer many administrators are willing to accept is more consolidation (despite a plethora of research to prove them wrong), the concept back of this quote has the ability to break educational thinking free of the always bigger box schools. It’s a powerful quote, please pass it along.

“For far too long, access to a high quality education has been too closely tied to…

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Old Abe the Eagle

Old Abe, Civil War hero, Case tractor model.

Sarah's Notebook

Old Abe was the mascot of the 8th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry in the American Civil War. Abe’s fame went far beyond her Civil War roots. She was the screaming eagle depicted on the insignia of the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division and became the symbol (modeled sitting on a globe) of the Case tractor company. Abe was captured in 1861 and was sold to the 8th Wisconsin’s Company C for $2.50. They named the female eagle after President Abraham Lincoln and built her a special perch to carry her into battle with them. She became legendary screaming and spreading her wings in an attack posture toward the enemy.  Confederates dubbed her the “Yankee Buzzard” and there were several attempts to capture her. She lost feathers to bullets and some of her handlers were killed under her. It was reported that General Ulysses S. Grant, General William T. Sherman, and General…

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Sarah Uthoff By the Numbers June 2020

Show me the numbers they say and I was inspired by a poster for a concert at Kirkwood that included the performer’s number of Facebook likes. I thought, “I can do that!” I did previous posts Trundlebed Tales by the Numbers August 19, 2013,  December 14, 2013 June 8, 2014December 19, 2014, April 13, 2015September 20, 2015 , December 30, 2015April 6, 2016February 5, 2017August 20, 2017 , and February 25, 2018, November 19, 2018, and June 29, 2019. It’s a collection of raw numbers of my online activities. It’s interesting to track. This number is a little off because I never got a second one done in 2019. Hopefully I’ll be on schedule next year and get two done. Today’s post numbers are as of June 3, 2020.

Twitter Header 2020

 

Number of blog posts published on Trundlebed Tales: 1,939

Total number of blog post views: 168,878

Highest number of views in a single day: 389

Number of YouTube videos on Trundlebed Tales YouTube Channel: 132

Total Number of Subscribers to Trundlebed Tales YouTube Channel: 234

Number of total views on Trundlebed Tales YouTube Channel: 88,523 views

Plus views of  my program on Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum channel: 28,665 and 4,243

For a total of YouTube views: 121,431

Number of Followers on Twitter: 2,193

Number of Friends on Facebook678 plus 299 follows

Number of Likes on Trundlebed Tales Facebook Page: 799 plus 829 follows

Number of connections on LinkedIn277

Slideshare Uploads: 4

Slideshare Views: 1,405

Number of episodes on Blog Talk Radio243

Number of total listens on Blog Talk Radio: 107,536

Highest listen number for an individual episode6,094

Number of Views on Academia.edu397

Followers on Academia.edu: 33

Photos added on Flickr148

Photos on Instagram1,407

Followers on Instagram: 305

Videos added on Vimeo: 31 (total watches not part of standard Vimeo statistics). Vimeo did send me an ad that said I had 716 views there last year.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help?  Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at her photos, and find her  on   Facebook ,   Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,     SlideShare,   and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Burr Oak – Laura Days 2007

A look back at Laura Days in Burr Oak, Iowa.

Sarah's Notebook

I was at Burr Oak this weekend for their Laura Days. They seem to be changing the venue somewhat. They moved several of the events previously held on Sunday, to Saturday, including the parade. This puts them more in line with how most of the other Days around the area work (Beef Days, Popcorn Festival, Trekfest, etc.)

The most interesting thing I hadn’t done before was the cemetery walk. I thought it was really interesting. Although there are a lot of modern stones, and not a lot of trees or flowers, if you walk around they really do have some interesting ones. There was the Symms family who lost sons to both Andersonville Civil War prison camp and with Custer at the Little Bighorn. There was the Brace family, two grandparents, who were caught in a flash flood while visiting friends. The house they were in was swept away leaving them…

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WordPress Anniversary 2020

It’s been a long time, but I wanted to share it was my WordPress anniversary recently. Thank you for reading this blog for 12 years, thank you for attending one of my programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watching my videos,  listening to my podcast,   looking at my photos, and finding me  on   Facebook ,   Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,     SlideShare,   and  Academia.edu .

Wordpress Anniversary Image

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help?  Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at her photos, and find her  on   Facebook ,   Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,     SlideShare,   and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.