Getting Logs Out of the Woods

Little Boy in the Big Woods

Farmer Boy has a chapter where Father Wilder and young Almanzo go to get wood out of their timber. As part of Almanzo’s plan to use his newly broken oxen and sled. Father Wilder had a big operation going, but Almanzo brought his own small sled along. We learn that empty sleds were supposed to get off the road in favor of loaded sleds. When Almanzo passes with a full load his oxen pull off the road and Father Wilder drives by with his empty sled. This was my grandmother’s least favorite part of the book. She never got over Father Wilder just going on by with his empty sled when Almanzo went in the ditch – she was a big believer in that taking care of kids is every adult’s number one duty. She never forgave him and still was kind of angry about it when she passed on.

Tiller’s International

Tiller’s International is an organazation with two main purposes. One is to preserve traditional practical living skills for farming and every day life. The other is to teach versions of these skills to people in undeveloped countries today to improve their quality of life. This video shows you the tools you use to move trees with hand tools and oxen.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos,   listen to her podcast,    look at her photos, and find her on Facebook ,   Twitter ,   LinkedIn ,   SlideShare,   and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Earth Day and Arbor Day

Revisit Earth Day and Arbor Day.

Sarah's Notebook

This month saw both Earth Day and Arbor Day. I celebrated Earth Day in my usual way, by forgetting to wear my official Earth Day T-shirt….again. I also got a free tree to plant from the National Mississippi River Museum, but it’s still in a vase on the kitchen table.

Arbor Day is much more important to me. One of my favorite gifts to send people is a certificate from the National Arbor Day Organization that trees have been planted in their honor. It also played an important role in many one-room schools. There were entire books (I have several) put out by some of the states each year on how to properly celebrate Arbor Day in your school with informative lessons, poetry, and photos. Iowa’s state quarter features a slightly modified image of Grant Wood’s painting “Arbor Day.” Find out more about it, here https://www.usmint.gov/learn/kids/library/50-state-quarters/iowa Be sure to check…

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Top 10 Posts During March 2020

Sarah in Pampas Grass

Here are the blog posts and pages that have had the most views last month. Take a look maybe there is something there that will interest you, too.

Read Along With TV’s Nellie Alison Arngrim

American Masters in De Smet 2020

Program Descriptions

$100 in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Lapdesk

Book: T Model Tommy

In the Kitchen With Laura Project February 2014

Booking a Program

Images Of The Past: Carrie Ingalls Swanzey

Historic Clothes with Micarah Tewers

Pa’s Bell at Walnut Grove

What comes next? Updated

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help?  Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at  her photos, and find her  on   Facebook ,    Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,      SlideShare,    and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Iowa Agriculture: Today, Tomorrow and Yesterday

Iowa Agriculture

I’m going to start doing a more in-depth description of one of my programs each month. Check them all out. Which one would you like to see most?

Iowa Agriculture: Today, Tomorrow, and Yesterday (PowerPoint Presentation)

Iowa Agriculture: Today, Tomorrow and Yesterday

This basis of this program was the one I took to the Iowa State Fair and got a Gold Seal of Excellence on. Since then I’ve continued to work on it. Today and tomorrow keep moving farther away!

Program Specifics

Agriculture has been the heart of Iowa since people first entered the state. The Ioway Native American tribe first started farming with metal implements in the 1700s. The story of farming continues on as pioneers came into the state. We follow through hitting the high points of agriculture, examining how things stayed the same and how things changed up until the present day. A good choice for any age group, this program offers in-depth information about agriculture. Photos range from historic photos, photos from Living History Farms and other historic sites, and all around us today. I can change the level the information is pitched at and I’ve presented it to great applause from early elementary school to adult groups.

It requires the ability to present in PowerPoint which means being inside, with electricity and a place to project. I can bring my own projector along or I can use yours. The program is a live show so length can vary, but it normally takes between 45 and 55 minutes. I prefer to have at least 10-15 minutes for questions afterward, but that is optional and if I need that long depends on whether it’s a talkative group or not.

This one is not covered by Humanities Iowa.

Sound interesting?

If this sounds interesting to you, ask a local museum or library to have me come and present Iowa Agriculture: Today, Tomorrow, and Yesterday program.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos,   listen to her podcast,    look at her photos, and find her on Facebook ,   Twitter ,   LinkedIn ,   SlideShare,   and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

A Round Up of Articles About Pepin WI

Revisiting Pepin.

Sarah's Notebook

I’ve decided that I need to make it easier to find articles on certain topics and it was time to hold a good old-fashioned round up.

These posts are all about Pepin, Wisconsin on the shores of beautiful Lake Pepin, really a widening of the Mississippi River. Laura Elizabeth Ingalls was born here Feb. 7, 1867. I have been visiting on a regular basis since 1984 and I’ve been the keynote speaker of their Laura Days in Pepin, held each September since 2006.

Laura Days

Quilts at Wayside Cabin Quilts at Wayside Cabin

My Report on Laura Days 2012:
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/pepin-laura-days-2012

Watch the Video Diaries of my trip:
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/pepin-laura-days-video-roundup

Find links for the annual Laura Days event:
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2012/09/07/heading-out-for-pepin

My interview with Kitty Latane who wrote the book on Laura’s connection to Pepin and is a longtime board member:
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2011/09/02/laura-ingalls-wilder-days-in-pepin

En route to Pepin 2008 (includes photo of Burr Oak’s strawberry butter mold):
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/09/19/burr-oak-spring-valley-pepin

Laura Days…

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Three’s Company Reunion

Come and knock on our door….

Sarah's Notebook

When I was growing up I used to really like Three’s Company. While a mild mannered sitcom on the outside, it was truly a farce and featured John Ritter who simply was one of the best physical comedians of all time.

In a set up that would never get approved today, the landlords had a three person apartment. It was going to be shared by two females and a male. The owners felt that this would be sure to lead to wild goings on and refused to let unmarried males and females live together. John Ritter’s character, Jack Tripper, assured them it would be fine because he was really homosexual so he wasn’t interested in the girls. This was a total fabrication (although they were all friends) so you had all sorts of farcical situations set up based on Jack trying to hide from the landlords that he…

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What’s in a Name? Almanzo Wilder

I say Almanzo, do you say Almonzo?

Sarah's Notebook

AlmanzoBirthday“There is no one in the family to carry on the name of Almanzo. I am very sorry and wish some Wilder family would so name a son.”

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Letter to Miss Webber. 11 February 1952.

If anyone out there is fortunate enough to have a last name of Wilder. I think this is a great idea. 😉 There were a number of Almanzos in New York state about the time he was born. Most traced back some how to a particular doctor that was very well thought of. I’m not sure where our Almanzo’s name came from, but I think (and this is only my opinion) that whole Crusader story was an embellishment of Rose’s.

It has always been a slippery name with being pronounced on the TV Show Al-MON-zo. The Hallmark radio version of The Long Winter also wrongly pronounced it this way. People (like the…

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