April 2019 Presentations

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April is always a busy month for presentations and this year is no exception. I’ve also added my first program in May. Check and see if there is a program coming near you.

  • Lake Mills Public Library – Lake Mills, Iowa – Packing Up – April 3, 2019 – 5:30pm
  • Athena Club – Belle Plain, Iowa – A Long Way Home (General Laura Program) – April 8, 2019 – 6:30pm
  • Ottumwa Women’s Club – Ottumwa, Iowa – In the Kitchen With Laura – April 9, 2019 – 1pm
  • Siouxland Libraries – One Book Siouxland: Prairie Fire -Sioux Falls, South Dakota – A Long Way Home (General Laura Program) – April 14, 2019 – 3pm
  • Nashua Public Library – Nashua, Iowa – Packing Up – May 4, 2019 – 10:30am

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast ,  look at her photos, and find her on   FacebookTwitterLinkedInSlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

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Iowa School Librarian Requirement Saved

Recently there was an effort in the Iowa General Assembly to remove the requirement that there be at least one librarian and nurse in every school district. This is being done under the ideal of local control. That is something that I also believe in to as an ideal, but there are certain times and places when the state government needs to step in to ensure something happens. There are times when people making the laws for the state may know things (through constituents reaching out) that the local school board isn’t aware of.  For example, study after study proves a student in a school with an active library program and a well supported library achieves more than a student without these things. Another example of this kind is requiring certified teachers which is done on a state level, not a local level. That’s the way to think of this requirement. There are times when the state should step in and I think having a librarian and more so an information literacy program is one of them.
I’ll note here that I worked as a school librarian in two K-12 school districts. However, I’m not employed in one now and I don’t really even know many K-12 librarians any more so this isn’t about me wanting to save anyone’s job. This is about what’s best for the state in creating an educated population.
I’m happy to say the amendment was killed. Below I’m reposting with permission the statement from the Iowa Library Association about this attempt to remove librarians from our schools.
If you want to know more about this instance or about efforts to support libraries and information literacy in schools, or for support for libraries across the board a good place to start is EveryLibrary’s post and then on to the rest of their page.

This from Dan Chibnall, ILA President:

Last evening [Ed. Note: February 28, 2019], the [Iowa General Assembly] Senate Education Committee met to discuss SSB 1190, the bill that contained language striking the requirements for teacher librarians and nurses in Iowa schools. As of last night, that threat no longer exists.

During the committee meeting, Sen. Mark Lofgren proposed an amendment striking the teacher librarian and nurse language from the bill. It passed by voice vote with no opposition. The bill now goes to the full Senate but our teacher librarian colleagues are safe.

Katy Kauffman, the 2019 Iowa Association of School Librarians President, wrote a great email last night to her IASL members and I’m going to borrow a little from that here so you know who was all involved in leading these efforts. The IASL Board, Lisa Beal (IASL Advocacy Chair), Karla Krueger, Joan Taylor, Mike Wright, Zach Stier, Shannon Miller, Cara Stone, Dara Schmidt, and Amanda Vazquez. There were others too, on listservs and social media, in email threads and at the Capitol. Thank you all for your hard work.

I want to give a special shout-out to our incredible lobbyists, Craig Patterson and Amy Campbell. Without them I don’t know where we would be. Thank you so much. Also, another special shout out to EveryLibrary, who came in at the 11th hour to help us in our time of need. If you’re not familiar with them, visit their site and get to know them. Patrick “P.C.” Sweeney and John Chrastka were so helpful with language and for helping us setup on their site to get the emails rolling. They also put together this website telling the story of our victory last night. I recommend you all take a look and share it with others: https://www.saveschoollibrarians.org/a_win_in_iowa.

I cannot thank all of you enough for your incredible efforts to help make this win a reality. When I ran for ILA President years ago, I talked quite a bit about the importance of communication between librarians, libraries, and our legislators. Last night those communication efforts paid off and I was so impressed by the sheer volume of your voices, telling your stories and sticking together with your colleagues across the state. Bravo to all of you. Let’s keep those voices loud and clear for our Legislative Day on March 13th at the [Iowa] Capitol.

If you have a few minutes today, please consider emailing or calling the senators who helped us last night and thank them for their tireless work and their votes.

Library Rescue What Jon Taffer Taught Me About Libraries

Screenshot of Bar Rescue HomepageJon Taffer is well known for his research of bar science on TV and in his publications. Although in many ways bars and libraries are different, they have some common goals of wanting to encourage people to walk in and to create an experience so they’ll want to come back. His methods regarding matching your neighborhood, having a consistent experience, signage, displays, and training, are all things that could also apply to libraries. This session will share examples of how libraries could and are using the ideas of bar science.

During the Iowa Library Association 2018 conference, I’m rolling out a brand new program applying what Jon Taffer teaches about bars to libraries. Look for me at a conference near you.

Handouts

Main Handout – JonTafferHO

Secret Shopper Checklist for the Library

ILAPressRelease

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

 

August 2018 Presentations

We’ve got 3 presentations this month back to back so if you are near northwestern Iowa stop on by!

  • Orange City Public Library – Orange City, IA – A Long Way Home (General Laura Program) – August 16, 2018 – 3:00 pm
  • Marcus Public Library – Marcus, IA – A Long Way Home (General Laura Program) – August 16, 2018 – 6:30pm
  • Paullina Public Library – Paullina, IA – A Long Way Home (General Laura Program) – August 17, 2018 – 10:00am

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

ALA Laura Ingalls Wilder Award Renamed

What is the fuss?

It’s been big news that the ALSC Laura Ingalls Wilder Award will be renamed in reputation of Laura’s works and her life. The basic story has been an international sensation from the United Kingdom to Denmark to all around the world.

Based on a couple of comments a few people have made to me online they expect this post to include a discussion of whether their complaints are valid or not. That is worth debating, but frankly, in this context I don’t think it matters. What is being debated right now is NOT whether there are there negative elements to the books, but if the large positive impact they have had on people and the culture as a whole should be ignored and denigrated.

The removal of the name is a slap in the face, not only for Laura herself, but also to a large part of American pop culture. Laura Ingalls Wilder is one of the biggest archetypes in our culture. Don’t believe me? Try to find anything pop culture that doesn’t include references to Laura. Major snow storm/power outage – it’s like we’re Laura Ingalls Wilder. Modest dress – it’s like I’m Laura Ingalls Wilder, Literally anything about social history in any location and any time period – hey, it’s just like Laura Ingalls Wilder, anything at all having to do with picnics or camping – it’s just like Little House on the Prairie!

So why focus on this now? Don’t librarians have real problems like dropping budgets, raising numbers of visitors (yes raising), and training necessities? Of course they do! But a very real problem is that so many people today can’t find themselves in children’s books. It truly is ridiculous that in an age of so much political correctness that the children’s books industry and product are  less than diverse. (Frankly looking at some of the books from today versus the 1970s I’m not sure it isn’t getting worse instead of better.) That is worth a blog post on its own and more. This is an issue that needs addressed with what the ALA normally does – recommends more books, more voices. Instead they decided the best thing they could do was something symbolic that would do nothing to make children’s literature more diverse – they can repudiate Laura.

What is the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award?

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award – also referred to as the Wilder Medal – was given as a lifetime achievement award by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The American Library Association is the BIG, national professional organization for librarians. (Think of the ALA as the librarian equivalent of American Medical Association without nearly as many teeth.) Among other things the ALA organization, either as a whole or as a division, gives awards mostly for authors and books. The two you have probably heard of before are the Caldecott Award for picture book illustration and the Newbery Award for chapter books.

1954 was a big year for Laura as the books came out under an entirely different redesign (by Helen Gentry) using the illustrations of Garth Williams. The ALSC joined the applause by creating a lifetime achievement award, making Laura the first recipient and having Williams design the medal that went with the award. (ALA awards tend to come with literal medals that can then also be used as a design element or sticker on further editions of the book.) From then until now the award has been given out to a wide range of children’s books authors.

Why Aren’t I As Upset As I Thought I’d Be?

So last February out of nowhere the ALSC announced they were going to start a “discussion” about changing the award’s name. I knew right then that the discussion would consist of them requesting input and then changing the name. That’s just how things go in the ALA (disclosure I’ve been a member on and off since library school). It’s a very top down organization and if the top had announced that changing it was a possibility it was going to be changed.

However, when I heard the news I wasn’t as upset as I thought I should be. I asked myself, “Why?” and I realized it didn’t really matter. Frankly, they had already diluted the original intent to the point that who cares about it? It was originally designed to be the equivalent of the special Oscar that Walt Disney was awarded for Snow White (specially made that has the one large Oscar and then 7 little Oscars scaled down to represent the dwarfs) – complete to the special and uniquely designed award dedicated to its first recipient. However, this hasn’t been the case for a long, long time. To go back to the Oscar reference there are sometimes amazing actors, actresses, and directors who never received one despite their storied status. A lot of things can prevent that recognition with an award, who they were up against, temper of the times, performing in comedies or work that as a whole isn’t deemed Oscar worthy, etc. So they have a lifetime achievement award, now called an “Honorary Oscar,” to correct such oversights. That was supposed to be the same type of thing — but for children’s book authors and/or illustrators.

The Wilder Award was supposed to carry weight because of its rareness, but that didn’t last long. Between 1960 and 1980 it was only given out once every 5 years, between 1980 and 2001 every 3 years, between 2002 and 2015 every other year, and since 2016 every single year. In fact one of the reasons given that they had to rename the current award instead of closing this and starting a new one was to ensure the status of next year’s award because you couldn’t possibly have a year without one. Now instead of being the province of the rarest of the rare it’s just another annual book award. The requirement has always been that a lasting legacy has been made by that author for their body of work with the expectation that this would be an end of career kind of award. Now it’s mostly just another award to pick up when you are prominent. (Scroll to the bottom for an archived version of requirements as I believe they will be changed as part of the rename.) Here is the information the website for the award before it was updated by this decision. At this point the medal already was not longer the tribute it was intended to be, so who really cares?

Irony Number 1 – Taking Back An Apology

This really has come 360 degrees. One reason Laura was never allowed to win the top ALSC award for chapter books, the Newbery medal, was that she only wrote series books. And that was considered beneath the DIGNITY and IMPORTANCE of serious children’s fiction. That smacked of trade and was something to be looked down on. She was just a Midwestern farm wife, what did she know about LITERATURE. She did have a fairly regular seat in the honor books (the runner ups) for the last part of her series – after the public let the ALA know about the impact she had, but never a win. So a big part of why Laura, why then was a mea culpa on the organization’s part. So they are not only changing the award, they are taking back the apology, pushing the books back into the realm of the unacceptable. (I do want to be clear that although some of those comments might sound like they were quotes from the time period they are not, they are just summing up the attitudes I’ve found documented in terms of Laura and children’s literature and librarianship of the time in general.) Once again the leaders of the organization are pointing out that she’s just a Midwestern farm wife who isn’t “with it” “out there” or “woke” that just describes her own time and place in her writing and isn’t worthy of reading.

Irony Number 2 – Award Only Known For Wilder Connection

The ALA is the organization that focuses on defending books. An entire division is dedicated to Banned Books Week. It reports attempts – both successful and not – to remove books with nothing short of derision. The fact that you have a problem with a book does not mean it’s not the right book for some reader. You don’t get to decide what someone else gets to read. Not this time.

They actually saw this criticism coming. Scroll down to rationale. They say “Additionally, changing the name of the award, or ending the award and establishing a new award, does not prohibit access to Wilder’s works or suppress discussion about them.” To some extent they are right in that frankly the name of the award will have very little impact on whether someone will read Laura’s books or not. In fact this fanfare of publicity might actually encourage some people to who haven’t read them yet to do so. However, by changing this name they are doing the most in their power – short of actually erasing the history of the award off their website all together – to make sure people don’t read them. They are saying these books aren’t something that should be read and respected. That the most in their power is so weak should not be an excuse for exercising it.

(As a side note, only legal agreements kept them from also repudiating the Geisel Award at this time. Watch out Dr. Seuss! They’re coming for you too! Honestly did any of these papers do more than read the press release? This was surely worth a paragraph in any story about the name change.)

Irony Number 3 – Mainly a Problem Because Laura is Still Read

While this was a slap in the face to Laura, it was also a kind of backhanded complement. The whole reason they’re doing this is because people still read Laura’s books and know who she is. The other two ALSC awards you might know about are the Caldecott Medal for picture books (named for famed nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph J. Caldecott who happened to die in America) the Newbery Medal (named for and eighteenth-century English bookseller John Newbery). They and other named awards are relatively safe from attack because when was the last time you read something of theirs? Did you have any idea who Caldecott or Newbery were before I just told you? But Laura you know, Dr. Seuss you know so they come under scrutiny.

If you won the Wilder award, you got a lovely medal and you presented a speech at the ALA conference that was recorded and sold by the ALA store (I have a collection of them) and reprinted in library magazines. After that future articles about you might include the phrase Wilder Medal winner…… That’s pretty much it. I follow the story of this medal with interest, but I fully believe that the small percentage of the general population who knows or cares anything about this award is because it’s named for Laura. It was a tribute to them to be associated with Laura’s name and if they don’t realize it, then they don’t deserve it.

Once this flurry has calmed down I feel I can safely say this will be the last time you ever hear a full sentence about this award ever again in any publication or news article outside of library or publishing industry journals. Expect to hear, “…and the Children’s Literature Legacy Award went to so and so” as part of a longer sentence. It never did have any impact on sales, on reading, on anything related except for people maybe taking notice when they heard Laura’s name to hear who won it. Outside the people who gave it and those who received it, no one cares about this award.

A typical example of a Wilder Medal reference in an article about a recipient. This example is from an article on Russell Freedman (if you haven’t read his stuff, do).

So What Can You Do?

Absolutely nothing. The ALA is a professional organization, which political actions aside, provides the normal professional organization status. There definitely reasons not to be a member, but if you can afford it there are professional benefits to belonging. This is not going to be the straw that broke the camel’s back. You’re not going to see people rushing to quit or join the ALSC or its parent the ALA based on this.

The only pressure that could be brought to bear is that of public opinion and hearing that the general public disapproves will only convince them they are right. Petitions, etc will only cause people with the power to change it to become more convinced that they are making a courageous stand to get the truth about these books out there. They aren’t trying to sell a product to the general public so what the general public thinks about their actions has no direct effect on them. Back when this first came out as a possibility I contacted the person listed as contact person on the award page. I asked them how ALA members not part of the children’s literature division or the general public could comment as part of the input. He didn’t know anything about it, but would get back with me. Still waiting. Complain online, write them letters, call the office. Feel free to let them know how you feel, but understand this going in. They don’t care.

And If Anybody Cares….

The newly renamed award is the Children’s Literature Legacy Award. Be very confident that you will never, ever hear of it again.

And for the record I contacted them (see above) because I thought I’d get questions about it online or at my programs – I didn’t – because nobody knows about this award and if not for the insult, nobody would care.

From the ALA

Official Press Release

Document 25

Document 29

UPDATED July 10 2018: Also, check out Visit the Original Wilder Medal. Also note that Document 25 which was the committees recommendation that I refer to several times and link to has been removed. Sadly it also is not available through the Internet Archive.

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on Facebook , Twitter , Google+LinkedIn , SlideShare, and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Time to Book a Program

We’re at the start of the new year and requests for programs are coming in!

If you’d like to see me in person, tell your local library, museum, conservation center, or service group. Still on the fence? Here’s an example of one of my programs. It’s a shortened version of my Christmas program.

Funding

If you are in Iowa, I suggest you look into funding my program through a Humanities Iowa grant. It’s just a little half page form and you can have me speak for $50 (depending on location overnight accommodations might also be required separately). You don’t have to go through a Humanities Iowa Speakers Bureau grant, but it is such a good deal that I strongly recommend it for programs in Iowa that qualify. I am also available to speak out of state.

Booking a Program

Presenting at Ottumwa
Presenting at Ottumwa

1.       Decide roughly what you want me to do. Do you have a program in mind? Read all about my possible programs.  Are you thinking about extras like handouts or crafts? How long do you want me to be there outside of the program (for example if it’s an event do you want me to circulate awhile before the presentation and drum up interest?)? Also, do you want me for one program or more?

2.       Contact me and set up a date. We both have to agree on a date and time that works for both of us.

3.       Price depends on exactly where you want me to go and what you want me to do. Please contact me so we can discuss the details. For programs NOT through Humanities Iowa normally I charge $200 a program with 40 cents a mile mileage, but exact charges can depend on the answers to number 1 above. You can talk with me for suggestions for funding.

Old Laura Cottonwood Tree
Uthoff dressed as 1930s by Cottonwood Tree at Memorial Site in De Smet SD

Qualifying for a Humanities Iowa Grant

As a member of the Humanities Iowa Speakers Bureau, I am pre-approved for their community group grants. That can be libraries, schools, museums, and other civic organizations or groups. Find a list of requirements at the link above, but basically you need to be located in Iowa and have a program aimed at either adults or families. Children only groups are not approved, but I’ve had approvals for groups that met within a school or had school groups come too as long as you also reach out to the public to come to the event. Be sure to specify how you will do that on the grant application.
Please note that you do NOT have to fill out the full grant application that is located under the Grants tab on their homepage for the Speakers Bureau.
If your group’s event is approved, you pay $50 and Humanities Iowa will cover most other expenses. (Extra costs might apply when an overnight stay is necessary, for supplies if you choose to add an optional craft, etc.)   For more information check their webpage.
Or contact them at:
Humanities Iowa
100 LIB RM 4039
Iowa City, IA 52242-1420
Storytelling
Storytelling

 

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

How Research Works: The Yale Goals Study

The more I work as a reference librarian, the more convinced I am that most people don’t have a good idea in their head about what the process of research looks like. Also, people have trouble telling the difference between something well researched and something not. So from time to time, I like to highlight articles that I’ve come across that do a good job explaining the process the researcher went through to get as close as possible to the truth.

I have previously posted about Clark Gable’s Undershirt and Easter Island.

The Yale Goals Study

Today’s post features an element that drives my friend Nancy Cleaveland crazy, using information because “I read it somewhere.” She even named her sock monkey Iris in honor of this frequent comment.

Oliver Burkeman and the Fast Company noticed that the Yale Goals Study was frequented cited in self-help materials, but that an official academic citation was never used. So they set out to find the study, but couldn’t….

https://www.fastcompany.com/3002763/why-setting-goals-could-wreck-your-life

For a follow up, check out the Yale University’s answer to the question. It also describes its efforts to prove or disprove the theory some of which is used in the article above, so of which isn’t.

What The Story Shows About Research

I especially appreciated:

  1. That they wanted to trace back a source.

This is one of the times when it’s important to back trace a reference. You don’t have to do this for every source you use, but the more you rely on it, the more work you should do tracing it down. References aren’t supposed to be, BUT CAN BE, a bit like playing telephone, especially when a direct quote isn’t used. Having an idea in your head you can easily grab an idea from someone else and cite it in a way they wouldn’t have. A couple of citations down the line and it can be established that someone means something that they never did or weren’t sure about or were postulating as a possibility. Even a quote can be taken out of context to shade its meaning closer to what you want. In this case a study, The Yale Study of Goals, wasn’t academically cited just passed along from one motivational speaker and/or writer to another.

2. Dig

They did a search themselves looking for both the study itself and for instances when the study was cited to trace it back.

3. Contacted Multiple People And/Or Groups

Branches of research and organizations can be very insular. Sometimes people strain to prove things that other people either already have or know about. Before you invest too much work into a topic, ASK! I can think of several times I’ve seen that happen in Laura research alone where someone had done the research and someone else came along and not knowing about the original research re-did the search. That is not always bad, sometimes you can pick up something they missed, but for basic facts it’s often a lot of unnecessary work that can they be applied to fresh subjects instead. Often even if you want to reconfirm the work it might give you locations of collections or information that you might not have thought to check so ask organizations and people first.

Sometimes an organization is just in a better position to search for information than any individual. In this case they turned to the Yale University Archivist who also involved the Yale Alumni Association. The association had access to members contact information which allowed them to quickly survey a good chunk of the class in question. They also were an organization the class members already had a relationship so they were more likely to respond to them. An individual could have done the same thing, but at the cost of a lot more research and likely a lower response rate.

4. And a Problem Analysis

They then took the idea that the non-existent survey was wrong and looked for information to support it. This is the weakest part of the article as they only give one example. Perhaps they offer more in the book? However, a single example, while illustrative, is hardly compelling and even if they didn’t take us through the full explanation of each listing a couple of more examples we could follow up on our own if we wanted to would have strengthened the piece.

Conclusion:

So let me say kudos to them for actually looking at a source and tracking it down. They did what the speakers who were building their careers on motivation should have done themselves. Although proving a negative is very difficult, this seems to pin down fairly conclusively that no such study, at least at that time and place, ever existed. The piece is much weaker in them proving that because the study didn’t exist that it was necessarily wrong in its conclusion. A further exploration of long term studies that DID exist and focused on goals would have had a lot to the strength of the piece.

Bonus: But why 1953?

There probably was a reason the person who told the story originally settled on 1953. However, putting a date on something always makes it seem real. I would bet that whenever it started the 1950s were far enough past that it worked with the story of checking later in life and it was probably in a year that ended with 3. People like round numbers and 30 years, 40 years would make it a nice figure.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.