Laura Ingalls Wilder SD Conference Update

After my experience last year, I was very excited to hear that the South Dakota State Historical Society’s 2017 conference theme was going to be Laura Ingalls Wilder.

They took the unusual step of moving the conference from the normal conference locations to Sioux Falls, South Dakota in order to help encourage and accommodate a better than normal attendance and I think they are already feeling that increase. Going by last year, they put information up after the first of the year so don’t be surprised if it takes awhile to get all the information up for all the links, but they have made progress.

Sarah on Ingalls Homestead in April
Sarah on Ingalls Homestead in April

Links Up

The main conference page changed over about a month after the last conference, but none of the links worked. They currently have two links up and working now (thanks to Nansie Cleaveland for the heads up). They work together. They have a skeleton  Schedule and the hotel information.

Lodging

The short story is that there is registration on Thursday (April 27) evening (last year they had a separately ticketed fun raiser that night), sessions all day Friday (April 28) (lunch included, supper not) and Saturday (April 29) until 3:30pm (again lunch included, supper not). So plan your hotel reservations accordingly.

Conference Hotel Information:
The Holiday Inn Sioux Falls—City Centre is the conference headquarters.

Holiday Inn Sioux Falls—City Centre
100 W 8th St, Sioux Falls, SD 57104
(605) 339-2000

Rooms have been reserved under the South Dakota State Historical Society History Conference and they must be booked by 28 March 2017 to receive the reduced conference discount.

Additional Lodging Details:

Other hotels in the Sioux Falls downtown area include:

Hilton Garden Inn Sioux Falls Downtown
201 E 8th St, Sioux Falls, SD 57103
(605) 444-4700

Country Inn & Suites By Carlson
200 E 8th St, Sioux Falls, SD 57103
(605) 373-0153

To De Smet and Beyond

Sioux Falls is the location of an international airport and one that is frequently used to fly into Laura country so that should make it a convenient location. If you want to include a trip to De Smet and get green grass photos (remembering that sites will not be fully open), De Smet is 1 hour and 45 minutes away. Walnut Grove is 2 hours away. That might effect your reservations as well.

Sarah S. Uthoff, "In the Pioneer Kitchen With Laura Ingalls Wilder"
Sarah S. Uthoff, “In the Pioneer Kitchen With Laura Ingalls Wilder”

See You There

I have my hotel reservation made at the main hotel. They said that they had a block with both 2 queens and a king with a pull out couch either for $104.00. That was via the hotel registration desk. I didn’t call the two satellite hotels to ask about their blocks. If you haven’t attended a hotel conference, I will say that I always try to stay at the main conference hotel if possible. I find that the convenience is worth any extra cash.

Hint About Links

So far those two links, schedule and lodging, are link at the bottom of the main page of the conference. The links with the same names on the right hand side of every page of the conference are not yet working.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Movie: The Power of the Daleks

Last night I attended a special showing of a Doctor Who story arc. Normally before I write about a movie I like to see it twice, but this is more of a so you know this exists than a full write up so I thought I’d go ahead and share.

Sarah in TARDIS
Sarah in TARDIS

Fandom

I used to think if you said you were a fan of something and somebody else said they were a fan of something you meant the same thing. I have since learned I was wrong. There are lots of Laura Ingalls Wilder fans who mean a lot less than I do by the term and there are a lot of Star Wars fans that mean a lot more. So with Doctor Who I’d say I’m a medium fan. I don’t go to cons and I haven’t built my own TARDIS, but I’ve been watching faithfully on Iowa Public Television my whole life, I have a sonic screwdriver and used a TARDIS key keychain all the way through high school and years after (I actually wore out a couple of them and they were metal), I had a great sunshade for my car that said TARDIS heatshield, I wore a bring back the Doctor pin on my coat for the entire 18 month shut down after…. well you get the point.

Watching Along

So I have to say while I wasn’t as anxious to see this as the people they interviewed for the Making Of special they showed afterward, the second Doctor is my third favorite Doctor and I was happy that I got a chance to go. This was a country wide release in limited theaters – a much larger pool than the 50th, but still limited for one night only. I was delighted to see on Facebook both before and after many friends around the country were watching “with” me – same time, different place.

Destruction of the Daleks and All the Rest of Doctor Who

If you don’t know, the labor/union movement was stronger in Great Britain than it was here. Early on in the industry people behind the scenes pictured a world where television would be nothing, but repeats or at least mostly repeats so they made a deal with the BBC that required them to pay the salaries of everyone as if they had just reshot the video instead of just replayed it. So with this contract in place showing repeats of older series wasn’t cost efficient. Old films were shipped to a storage facility that was pushed to overflowing. Sometime later a fire marshal inspected was horrified and told the BBC they had to enlarge and update the facility for that number of films. Instead they decided to throw out huge quantities of episodes of old TV shows.

They had a system, but they weren’t very good at it and what is lost is mostly haphazard. Mostly it favored fine art over  what they saw as lower class entertainment and for one reason or another destruction of episodes continued until the late 1970s. The haphazard system meant that only single reels of some episodes were lost, in some cases all that were left were black and white copies that had originally been shot in color, and some entire stories were missing. Other copies were shipped off to TV stations around the world that could show the episodes in other countries and forgotten about. Ever since the late 1970s aka when someone with good sense realized this was happening and stopped it, the search for the 152 single episodes that were completely missing was on. Over the years in sometimes strange and mysterious ways 55 of these episodes have been rediscovered leaving 97 undiscovered.

“Never Give Up, Never Surrender!”

OK that title comes from the wrong sci fi fandom, but it describes Doctor Who fans to a T. Back in the pre-VCR days some fans loves their shows so much that they would record the episode on tape so they could at least listen to it again whenever they wanted. Some at least of these recordings have been collected giving someone very smart the idea of “restoring” these episodes. If you can’t find the real thing, you could at least make use of those sound only recordings of the original episodes.

Using knowledge of the characters actions and facial expressions, publicity stills and fragmentary existing footage efforts were put together to fill the gaps in some existing stories creating animated visuals to go with the sound. That’s what the “missing, but animated” notations mean on the list I linked to in the last section.

Movies versus Episodes

Traditionally Doctor Who was broken into story arcs that would stretch over weeks. That was a familiar format on dramatic radio shows where you would follow a storyline for a few weeks before the show moved on to another story. Doctor Who episodes were traditionally shown in 30 minute episodes. A single story might have as few as 1 or as many as 12 week’s episodes. More recent efforts show these arcs of episodes strung together in one big movie. For instance right now PBS stations around the country are showing the Tom Baker “movies.” There’s a bit of pacing problem with that. It swoops to a cliffhanger every 30 minutes instead of having one long arc besides having to deal with the tags. NuWho abandoned this entirely have self-contained or two parters of roughly 50 minutes each.

“The Power of the Daleks” Format

So the big event was the debut on the big screen of the storyline or “movie” of a second Doctor episode that had been entirely lost. Taking a sound track (and either it was exceptionally well recorded on a very high end machine or they did a near miraculous job of cleaning it up) and adding animation for the entire story arc of the six episode “The Power of the Daleks.”

The animation was a little different than what I was expecting. I thought they’d do it in color, but nope it was gray tones all the way through. I also thought they would maybe drop in what footage they had or at least a little preview that showed what the characters really looked like from existing footage. It’s all animation though.

The Daleks themselves are 100% plus spot on. They were just perfect and you couldn’t want more from a Dalek. You saw them using their suckers for something other than helping push doors open. The voice was terrific especially when they tripped themselves up being sneaky “Daleks are bet…different than humans.”

The people while they still looked like themselves were animated in a 1970s comic book style. The backgrounds were great, the clothes and hairstyles reflected publicity stills perfectly, but their movement was marionette like at best. A few more face close up shots when they were moving might have looked better. Their face movements or slight movements when standing talking looked much better.

The First Regeneration and Reflecting Backward

This was the first episode of the second Doctor and shows the very first regeneration of the Doctor. This brilliant idea kept the series going, but it was a new idea to viewers and the writers don’t have the details we know about the process done yet. They do a very nice analysis of how they did this.

I also think they reflected back some of what has been developed in the meantime. For example the look of the Dalek creature inside the case is what has been established in nuWho not what we’d seen before. Also, the look of the effect of the Dalek ray is from more modern Who.

Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down

If you are Doctor Who fan enough to have watched some of the black and white episodes with the second Doctor, you’ll enjoy this. It does take a bit to get used to the style of animation of the people, but it’s definitely worth watching. If you don’t already know the second Doctor’s facial expressions and how he moves I think you can safely give this a miss. I’m looking forward to seeing it come out on DVD, especially to hear the commentary tracks which looked really good in the Making of special.

Let me know what you think.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

 

 

What Did the Rebel Yell Sound Like?

FlagsI’m passing this along because you hear so much about the Rebel Yell. It was one thing that helped scare Union troops in the dark early days of the Civil War. The Smithsonian has found a recording made at one of the reunions when there were Confederate soldiers till alive. This is many years after the fact by much older men, but I wanted to give you something to hear in your head when you read about it.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/what-did-the-rebel-yell-sound-like

And to counter that, the winning side, the red, white, and blue.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mentions October 2017

Sarah on Ingalls Homestead in April
Sarah on Ingalls Homestead in April

This month’s mentions of me and Trundlebed Tales that appeared in the news during October 2016.

“Bringing Wilder to Life.” Clinton [IA] Herald. 24 Oct. 2016.
http://www.clintonherald.com/news/bringing-wilder-to-life/article_50c528d6-9a13-11e6-93e1-639bd62735c5.html

“Top 5 Things To Do This Weekend” Sauk Valley. 3 Nov. 2016.
http://www.saukvalley.com/2016/11/03/top-5-things-to-do-this-weekend-nov-4-6-2016/ao14ayr/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Top Ten Posts October 2016

Here are the blog posts that have had the most views last month. Take a look maybe there is something there that will interest you too. :)

Sarah S. Uthoff, "In the Pioneer Kitchen With Laura Ingalls Wilder"
Sarah S. Uthoff, “In the Pioneer Kitchen With Laura Ingalls Wilder”
Information Literacy Presentation 2
Fall 2016 Schedule for the L.M. Montgomery Society of Ontario
October 2016 Laura Ingalls Wilder Events
What comes next? Updated
Conference Tweets on Twitter
In the Kitchen With Laura Project February 2014
What comes next?
32 Favorite Movies From 1980 On
Laura Ingalls Wilder Patch Podcast
October 2016 Presentations
Where did Albert come from?
Schedule of Presentations
Program Descriptions

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Thanksgiving from Puritan to Pioneer Update

Back in 2013 I did a presentation at the Association of Living History Farms and Museums national conference about Thanksgiving with the incomparable Kathleen Wall (who handled the what the Puritans actually did portion). I just did it again at Windmill Area in Fulton, IL and I thought it was time to share the information again.

Thanksgiving Card me and turkey

Handouts

I have a strong belief that handouts should be set up to easily share the gist of the information. Therefore my normal handout is one page, sometimes I slide to two pages like this one, but I always have a paragraph that summarizes my main points and a list of resources used. For this handout I’ve added a list of important dates. I hope you find this handout useful both as a PDF and in this post.

thanksgivinghandout

Why Pioneers and Victorians Have More to Do with Starting Thanksgiving Than the Puritans

Although Thanksgiving is most closely associated with the Pilgrims/Puritans, most of how we celebrate was created by Victorians building upon a nearly global tradition of celebrating the harvest in the fall. Starting in New England, it slowly spread across the country. By the 1850s the connection of Thanksgiving with turkey, pumpkin, and eating a big meal with the extended family (if possible)and the New York Times considered it a national holiday although the exact dates varied as they were proclaimed by each individual state governor until Lincoln’s proclamation in 1863 and the President’s proclamation each year subsequently. Many parts of Thanksgiving came later than you would think (it wasn’t made a fixed official federal holiday until 1941), but traditions slowly grew up over time. These myths and legends all gave credit to the Puritans to more modern traditions. This link focused America’s founding and history on Puritan New England instead of other earlier settlements and helped shape her values. It was supported by the repeated waves of Colonial Revival.

Dates

  • After 1815, no more Presidential Thanksgivings as day of prayer, gratitude, and reflection
  • 1822, Account of 1621 thanksgiving rediscovered
  • 1841, Alexander Young declared 1621 was first Thanksgiving as we think of it today
  • 1854, NYT urges keep “institution as our Puritan grandmothers left it”
  • 1855, NYT says Thanksgiving is now a national holiday
  • 1863, Official American Thanksgiving, November
  • 1876, First Big Thanksgiving Football Game
  • 1879, Official Canadian Thanksgiving, October
  • 1889, Standish of Standish by Jane G. (Jane Goodwin) Austin
  • 1921, Gimble’s Thanksgiving Parade, Philadelphia begins
  • 1924, Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade, New York begins
  • 1924, Hudson’s Thanksgiving Parade, Detroit begins
  • 1939-1940-1941 Franksgiving
  • 1941, American Thanksgiving set by Congressional Joint Resolution to fourth Thursday in November

Sources and Citations

Unfortunately citations in WordPress lose some of their formatting, but you can find it correct on the PDF version. Hyperlinking in this blog design adds an underline which should not be there in the formatting. These citations are done in 7th edition MLA. The 8th edition came out earlier this year, but they are still overlapping in use so I left it in 7th and added new references in that format.

Ames, Kenneth L. Death in the Dining Room and Other Tales of Victorian Culture. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press, 1922. Print.

Anderson, Laurie Halse. Thank You, Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002. Print.

Baker, James W. and Peggy M. Baker. “Thanksgiving.” Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. Ed. Solomon Katz. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2003. 394-396. Print.

Clarkson, Janet. Pie: A Global History. London: Reakiton, 2009. Print.

Cohen, Hennig and Tristram Potter Coffin [eds.] The Folklore of American Holidays. Detroit, Michigan: Gale, 1989. Print.

Curtin, Kathleen and Sandra L. Oliver. Giving Thanks: Thanksgiving Recipes and History, from Pilgrims to Pumpkin Pie. New York: Clarkson Potter, 2005. Print.

Hough, Henry Beetle. “It’s Thanksgiving Because It’s Home.” New York Times. 24 November 1946.

“Lydia Maria Child.” Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Biography. 2013. Web. 6 June 2013.

Myers, Robert J. Celebrations: The Complete Book of American Holidays. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company, 1972. Print.

Rothman, Lily. “FDR Moved Thanksgiving to Give People More Time to Shop.” 28 Nov. 2014. Web. 29 Oct. 2016.

Smith, Andrew F. Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn in America. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institute Press, 2001. Print.

“Thanksgiving.” New York Times. 6 November 1852: 1.

“Thanksgiving.” New York Times. 18 November 1858: 4.

“Thanksgiving Ahead.” New York Times. 25 October 1854: 4.

“Thanksgiving And the Aftermath.” New York Times. 24 November 1901: SM13.

“Thanksgiving Day.” New York Times. 29 November 1855: 4.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Farmer Boy. New York: Harper Brothers, 1933. Print.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little Town on the Prairie. New York: Harper Brothers, 1941. Print.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. On the Banks of Plum Creek. New York: Harper Brothers, 1937. Print.

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. “Thanksgiving Time.” Ed. William T. Anderson. A Little House Sampler. New York: Harper and Row, 1988. Print.

Wilder, Mrs. A.J. “As the Farm Women Thinks.” Missouri Ruralist. 1 November 1923: 16.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Austin N. Palmer Video Uploaded

Check out the Austin Palmer video.

Sarah's Notebook

I uploaded a video this weekend showing how to visit Austin N. Palmer’s grave in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Palmer developed the Palmer Method. Check out my post about my search and more photos.

UPDATED Nov 5 2016: This post originally was posted back in 2010. I fixed the link so the embedded YouTube video and added the bit linking in the information about finding the grave. I also added my current signature block.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos

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