Mentions June 2016

Board at Pageant 2012

This month’s mentions of me and Trundlebed Tales. This month I have an article I published on the Little House on the Prairie website.

Uthoff, Sarah. “About The Ingalls Family.” Little House on the Prairie. n.d. Web. 6 July 2016.

http://littlehouseontheprairie.com/about-the-ingalls-family/

(Note: This was published in June 2016, but not dated on page. )

 

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Trundlebed Tales Rolls Out New Brochure for 2016

Brochure2015aI’ve updated on my brochure for 2016. Take a look! Remember Trundlebed Tales is more than just in person presentations and a blog, I have a website, YouTube channel, podcast, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Find my links all around the web. If you haven’t seen it yet, take a look at my trading card for this year.

But I think it’s most important that I speak in person. If you want to hear me, be sure to pass this on to your local library, museum, or event.

Brochure2016

For more in depth descriptions of my program than show in the brochure check out my Program Descriptions page and for more information about booking check out How to Book a Program. 🙂

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

4H History in Newport Township in Johnson County Iowa

4-H History in Newport Township in Johnson County, Iowa

4H Poster from Clover Girls in late 1980s
4H Poster from Clover Girls in late 1980s

Today there is only co-ed 4-H, but it used to be there were separate clubs for boy clubs and girl clubs. They focused on different things. The girls focused on things like sewing and cooking. The boys focused on things like showing livestock. If a girl wanted to participate with livestock she had to belong to both clubs and do double the requirements for belonging to 4-H.

Newport Township has had two girls 4-H clubs during the 44 years. There was an intervening time from 1940 to 1956 that the girls in the township belonged to the Graham Crackers and to the East Lucas Township girls clubs.

The first club was called The Wide Awake Club.

Year Leader Leader Number of Members
1929 Mrs. Roy Sponey 20
1930 Mrs. Roy Sponey Mrs. Faye Sponey 15
1931 Mrs. Faye Sponey Mrs. Edna Hotka No report
1932 Mrs. Edna Kadera No report
1933 No record
1934 Mrs. Faye Sponey Eleanor Shimon No report
1935 Mrs. Jake Lackender Mrs. George Krall 7
1936 Mrs. Jake Lackender Mrs. George Krall 7
1937 Mrs. Jake Lackender Mrs. George Krall 7
1938 Mrs. Jake Lackender Mrs. George Krall 6
1939 Mrs. Jake Lackender Mrs. George Krall 6

 

In 1956, a new girls club was formed. This club was called The Clover Girls.

Year Leader Leader Number of Members
1956 Mrs. Ray Gorski Mrs. Elmer Wonick 9
1957 Mrs. Ray Gorski Mrs. Elmer Wonick 13
1958 Mrs. Elmer Wonick Mrs. Steve Conner 15
1959 Mrs. Elmer Wonick Mrs. Steve Conner 17
1960 Mrs. Elmer Wonick Mrs. Steve Conner No report

The Newport Hillbillies 4-H club was organized in 1956 for Newport Township club members. Previous year’s 4-H members in Newport Township had belonged to Victory, Graham, Big Grove Buddies, and Scott Showstoppers 4-H clubs.

Year Leader Leader Number of Members
1956 Joseph Krall Aage Jenson 7
1957 Joseph Krall Aage Jenson 18
1958 Joseph Krall Aage Jenson 16

The name of this township club was changed in 1959 to Newport Rangers.

1959 Joseph Krall James Smith 10

This is a typed transcript of a handwritten report written by then Clover Buds (the coed club that developed out of the Clover Girls) leader Orianna Haman in 1973. I’m not sure why she didn’t include information past 1960.

-Typed and explanatory information at the beginning and the end of report by Sarah S. Uthoff and that’s my poster in the image. – February 16, 2016

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Why I Reblog

Sarah in Brandon, Iowa next to world's largest frying pan
Sarah in Brandon, Iowa – Home of the World’s Largest Frying Pan

As a reader of this blog, you will see that I reblog my own posts on a regular basis and you may wonder why. I try to do one reblog a week although if I don’t have a new post ready to go sometimes I may do an extra.

What Posts I Reblog

I take these reblogs as an opportunity to revisit posts that previously were heavily viewed  or ones I particularly liked. At first I was doing them in order of the most viewed. That meant the most heavily viewed posts of all time were updated first no matter when they were posted, but since then I’ve decided it would be better to wake up posts after they’ve had a little time to settle. The posts I’ve been doing lately are from 2013 or before, in other words not from the last two years.

How I Update

Before I reblog a post I go back through and re-read looking for possible edits for clarity, typos, broken links, or other errors. I also update the format to what I’m using now. That means putting in headings, updating my signature block and seeing if photos need to be added, changed, or made larger. Sometimes I add an informational update if things have changed or links to another blog post with related information I wrote after I posted the one I’m updating.

All of that work makes the posts a lot more useful for readers and reawakens posts that have settled to the bottom of the blog. I hope you enjoy visiting these posts with me and that you agree that they are worth a reblog.

NOTE: The photo is the very first regular photo of me (not cropped for the header) that I uploaded to the blog. Time to wake it up too. 🙂

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Mary Ingalls Pageant 2015

From the Mary Ingalls Pageant:

Cast Learning from a Former Student
Cast Learning from a Former Student

“Mary Ingalls – Her Journey” returns to the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School for its 2nd Season.

Once again the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School auditorium will provide the setting for the Pageant depicting Mary Ingalls and her life as a student at the school.   It provides a unique opportunity to be surrounded by history and watch it at the same time.

If you were able to join us for last year’s first ever Pageant production, you will not want to miss this year’s updated version. If you could not be with us last year, you are in for a treat.

Construction on Old Main to repair damage done in the windstorm of 2011 is completed, and guests are again able to enter through the front doors. The Founders Room will be available for Pageant guests to see as well as the newly reopened museum on the third floor. Plan to come early and spend some time exploring them. There will be IBSSS Mary Ingalls Society members available to provide information and answer questions.

Transportation will again be provided to those needing it to get from remote parking locations to Old Main.

Production dates and times are July 31 and August 1 at 7:00 p.m. and August 2 at 2:00 p.m. Doors will open one hour before show time. Tickets are $10.00 and there is general admission seating on the main floor and balcony of the auditorium. Tickets may be purchased ahead of time by going to www.ACTI.org on the computer or at the door.

COME JOIN US – YOU’LL BE GLAD YOU DID

Update

Only 21 days till opening night of “Mary Ingalls – Her Journey” at the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School.

There is lots of activity – lines to learn, costumes to try on, props to find, furniture to move, pictures to take and promotion to prepare. All this energy expended to bring you the story of Mary Ingalls’ time at the Iowa College for the Blind.

Be sure to include us in your plans for the weekend of July 31, Aug. 1 at 7p.m. and Aug. 2 at 2:00 p.m in the Old Main auditorium on the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School campus. Tickets are $10 and are for general admission. Come early and spend time visiting the Founders Room and Museum.

GOOD NEWSwww.ACTI.org has been fixed. If you went there earlier thinking you could purchase advanced tickets and were unable to do so, please try again. You can also purchase tickets at the door before each performance.

Hope to see you there.

Chiming In

I have to say I didn’t have anything to do with the writing of this show and I was enchanted when I saw it. I especially thought the middle section where recollections of actual students were used to show what Mary’s life at the blind school was like were particularly effective. It helps fill in the big gap in the books about what happened to Mary when she went to school. A big moment is when they reenact Mary’s graduation where it actually happened.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

“Aunt Becky” Young – Civil War Heroine

“Aunt Becky” Young was well-known during the Civil War and her efforts to take care of soldiers led many of them to have such fond memories that when she died in in 1908 newspapers around the country, including the New York Times, carried the headline “‘Aunt Becky’ Dies” secure that their readers would know who they meant.

“Aunt Becky” was not her real name. She was born Sarah A. Graham in Ithaca, New York in 1830 and had been married to Abel O. Palmer before the war started, so she was known as Sarah Palmer during the Civil War. She served as a nurse during the war, but she resented being called Mother by the wounded men as was commonly done at the time by soldiers not knowing a nurse’s name. One of the soldiers said she looked like his Aunt Becky and she figured that was better than mother and it stuck.

Her first husband, Abel O. Palmer, died early on in the Civil War and shortly thereafter “Aunt Becky” joined the service as an army nurse in 1862. She served in hospitals in Baltimore (MD) and Bladensburg (MD) and was put in charge of the hospital at Beltville (MD). Later following the battles, she established and ran an army hospital at Falls Church(VA). She provided nursing service at Fredericksburg (VA), Spottsylvania (VA), Cold Harbor (VA), Chancellorsville (VA), and Petersburg (VA). She received personal commendations for her work from both General Ulysses S. Grant and President Abraham Lincoln.

Aunt Becky reported this story to the Philadelphia Press and it was reprinted in the Jan. 13, 1900 Richmond Planet, now available on the Library of Congress website.

Aunt Becky reported that she had a group of wounded soldiers that she knew would die if she didn’t get them to Washington, D.C., but she couldn’t get exchanges for them that would allow them to travel. “So I went to up to the Quartermaster’s office to make a call and there were a lot of tickets of exchange lying on the desk. I shoved some off with my elbow, and when I got back I found that I had captured 14 of them. Without saying a word to anybody I pinned them on the worst cases and when the sick from other divisions were being carried down to the boats, I had one nurse carry these men down to meet them, and they were safely packed off.”

“Well, the next morning the doctor came around. ‘Where is Brother Jonathan?’ said he, asking for one of the patients.’ ‘Gone to Washington,’ the nurse told him.”

“‘By whose orders?’ he asked.”

“‘Aunt Becky’s,’ they said.”

“Then he came right down to me, and he was furious.”

“‘I’ll discharge you at once,’ he threatened. ‘I’d like to know on whose responsibility you sent those men off.'”

“‘On my own,’ I said, very quietly. ‘They’d have died if they stayed here.'”

“So he went straight to General Grant to complain of me, and he told how I had stolen the tickets for them and all.”

“General Grant laughed and said: ‘I’ve got nothing to say. Aunt Becky out ranks me!'”

“I didn’t get discharged, you may guess, laughed Aunt Becky, as she told this tale. “And listen,” she called, “those men who went to Washington all got well.”

After the War, “Aunt Becky” remarried in 1867 to Mr. D.C. Young and they moved to Des Moines, Iowa. In 1898 when the Spanish-American War broke out, “Aunt Becky” took the head of the Iowa Sanitary Commission for this new war. She served as its President, and chair of the purchasing and forwarding committees. Ten years later Aunt Becky passed away and was survived by her second husband for two more years.

She was laid to rest in Woodland Cemetery in Des Moines, Iowa. The GAR had erected a flag pole by her grave, but it had rusted and been forgotten. Just this year (2009), the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War led an effort to get a proper military stone for her grave and to replace the long rusty flagpole. They were dedicated on Veterans Day this year.

Read more about Aunt Becky and her monument here:
http://www.iowacivilwarmonuments.com/cgi-bin/gaarddetails.pl?1248728661

Buy a re-print of Aunt Becky’s book about her Civil War experiences here:
http://www.applewoodbooks.com/The-Story-of-Aunt-Beckys-Army-life-P3770.aspx

Photos from the ceremony in 2009 unveiling the restoration:
http://www.iowavalor.com/comment.php?comment.news.70

UPDATE April 9, 2015: I corrected the links that were here before and added one showing photos of the unveiling. I also added a note to clarify a reference to “this year” and decided the cities/battles should have the states with them so I added the postal abbreviations in quotes. I’ve been trying to add more women of Iowa to my blog posts so I’m glad to come back and re-visit Aunt Becky.

I’ve also added a new category to blog posts. It’s historic Iowa women. I’ve been trying to do more posts pointing out the many contributions of Iowa women and I finally decided it needed its own category. I’ll have to go back and add categories for previous posts.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.