De Smet Event 2017

It’s FINALLY here! Today starts the De Smet Event 2017 (July 14-16). Below find links to my interviews about it and other places you might want to know about. I’ve also written up summaries of the interviews if you just want to scan them instead. (Oh and by the way, I looked it up and first De Smet Event was 2005.)

Horses and Covered Wagon
Horses and Covered Wagon at Ingalls Homestead

De Smet Event

I interviewed Tessa Flak back in May. Here’s all the scoop.

Find the Schedule

Dean Butler and Alison Arngrim will start with the paid autographs at 10:30am. They will break at noon and will cut off the line ahead of the break. Everyone who buys a ticket will get signed.

They’re not going to do photos during the signing because they want people to attend the autograph session on Sunday morning with a photo session.

On Sunday they are going to do a Confession from Prairies show with Alison Arngrim. It’s the family friendly version of her show. It will be at 2pm  and include a reception. Tickets are required.

Nancy Koupal is a Memorial Society board member from the 1990s. She’ll talk about the Pioneer Girl Project and Bill might jump in.

Judy Thompson is the artist behind covers of Pioneer Girl and Pioneer Girl Perspectives. She’s present and demonstrate drawing. Her original artwork will be on display.  The prints of the covers are available for sale.

William T. Anderson is the main Laura authority. He’s going to talk about how he got involved with Laura and his history with De Smet.

All programs will be varied so not the same each day.

Programs will be held in a tent in the museum’s park which is besides the city park with the one-room school that serves as a hands on discovery center. The street between the Surveyors House and Gift Shop and the park will be closed.

Dean and Alison signatures will be $6 per item signed. You want six signatures, you need six tickets. There are no official limits on what to sign. If you don’t have anything you want signed, they will have photos available for sale in the gift shop.

At the pageant Dean and Alison will have a question and answer session before the pageant starting at 7pm. They will only take cash and check. The pageant starts at 8pm. There is food available on grounds and a gift shop.

Tip bring own chairs. The food is like what you would find at a high school sporting event.

They will have additional wagons on the grounds this summer. When you go through the gate. You get a prize drawing slip, a wagon riding ticket, a newspaper of the event. They will do a state roll call. The rule is you have to yell for your home state and EXTRA loud for Iowa.

New to the Memorial Society’s collection is the restored 1880s covered wagon and 3 new archival cases.

The gift shop has the Surveyors House Cookie Cutter. There is also going to be a new, updated, and extended edition of the Ingalls Family of De Smet in honor of the 60th Anniversary of the museum.

Dean Butler

I also interviewed Dean Butler about the De Smet event.

Dean Butler was interviewed previously on the show in 2014 in honor of the TV show’s 40th anniversary event.

I was glad to welcome him back to talk about some of his most common “Little House” questions, what signing events are like in general, and what’s going to happen in De Smet in particular.

A note about the sound. It’s a little low so you’ll want to turn it up, but be aware there are a couple places where it will suddenly pop loud. Unfortunately the connection could have been better.

Dean Butler, a died Pepsi person, who played Almanzo on the NBC version of The Little House on the Prairie TV show. He started actin in High School in a production of Once Upon a Mattress. (Fun fact: I was also in a completely different high school production of Once Upon A Mattress – made famous by Carol Burnett – as a unnamed and unnumbered lady in waiting.)

His big break was in a movie version of Forever by Judy Blume. Michael Landon’s daughter was a fan and helped get him an audition. He was hired two weeks before graduation. Later he would appear as Moondoggie in The New Gidget and Buffy’s dad on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He was associated with several iconic young woman characters and is honored to have those associations.

He thinks people like the Chicken Cinnamon episode is popular because it’s a good example of Laura’s gumption. Almanzo’s favorite food was really Liver’n’Onions.

Almanzo-Almonzo Dean has finally been convinced to pronounce it Almanzo the clincher being the recording of Laura saying his name. You can buy the recording, it’s called Laura Ingalls Wilder Speaks. Find it at any of the homesite museum giftshops online or in person. He always points out Lucy Lee Flippin was the first to pronounce it that way and he got pounded by fans for pronouncing it wrong from the beginning.

Dean attends a couple of signing events every year. He has 6 scheduled this summer. It’s important to be out there and keep the show alive to pay back the fans for their investment and support. His wife always says he’s going off for another weekend of adoration. One of the best parts of signing is the multi-generational component. He often signs books for daughter-mother-grandmother.

It’s a different signing experience at homesites and much better. Once at a mall a teenager got very aggressive and drew attention to how there really is trust between signers and signee. There is also a balance in signing how to make a connection with each person, but not to let them monopolize your time. Signing body parts doesn’t phase him, but he doesn’t like signing things people probably won’t keep like a wadded up napkin or a ratty piece of paper. He prefers something solid, like a book or a photo.

Dean’s programs are extraneous and focus on his experience with the TV show. The cast mostly gets together at appearances. He has been to the location of the exterior of the show set many times since the show ended. You can really tell where the Ingalls homestead was, but the town site is completely grown over. The last time he was there you could still find some debris from the big explosion and it took him right back to the day they watched it explode. I asked a follow up about the covered bridge with open sides. He says it’s on the Disney ranch. Besides, Little House look for that bridge on shows like The Dukes of Hazzard, Remington Steele, Scarecrow and Mrs. King, NCIS, etc. Those are off the top of my head, feel free to add to the list in the comments below. Keep an eye out for it. Info on visiting the site.

 

Movie: The Power of the Daleks

Last night I attended a special showing of a Doctor Who story arc. Normally before I write about a movie I like to see it twice, but this is more of a so you know this exists than a full write up so I thought I’d go ahead and share.

Sarah in TARDIS
Sarah in TARDIS

Fandom

I used to think if you said you were a fan of something and somebody else said they were a fan of something you meant the same thing. I have since learned I was wrong. There are lots of Laura Ingalls Wilder fans who mean a lot less than I do by the term and there are a lot of Star Wars fans that mean a lot more. So with Doctor Who I’d say I’m a medium fan. I don’t go to cons and I haven’t built my own TARDIS, but I’ve been watching faithfully on Iowa Public Television my whole life, I have a sonic screwdriver and used a TARDIS key keychain all the way through high school and years after (I actually wore out a couple of them and they were metal), I had a great sunshade for my car that said TARDIS heatshield, I wore a bring back the Doctor pin on my coat for the entire 18 month shut down after…. well you get the point.

Watching Along

So I have to say while I wasn’t as anxious to see this as the people they interviewed for the Making Of special they showed afterward, the second Doctor is my third favorite Doctor and I was happy that I got a chance to go. This was a country wide release in limited theaters – a much larger pool than the 50th, but still limited for one night only. I was delighted to see on Facebook both before and after many friends around the country were watching “with” me – same time, different place.

Destruction of the Daleks and All the Rest of Doctor Who

If you don’t know, the labor/union movement was stronger in Great Britain than it was here. Early on in the industry people behind the scenes pictured a world where television would be nothing, but repeats or at least mostly repeats so they made a deal with the BBC that required them to pay the salaries of everyone as if they had just reshot the video instead of just replayed it. So with this contract in place showing repeats of older series wasn’t cost efficient. Old films were shipped to a storage facility that was pushed to overflowing. Sometime later a fire marshal inspected was horrified and told the BBC they had to enlarge and update the facility for that number of films. Instead they decided to throw out huge quantities of episodes of old TV shows.

They had a system, but they weren’t very good at it and what is lost is mostly haphazard. Mostly it favored fine art over  what they saw as lower class entertainment and for one reason or another destruction of episodes continued until the late 1970s. The haphazard system meant that only single reels of some episodes were lost, in some cases all that were left were black and white copies that had originally been shot in color, and some entire stories were missing. Other copies were shipped off to TV stations around the world that could show the episodes in other countries and forgotten about. Ever since the late 1970s aka when someone with good sense realized this was happening and stopped it, the search for the 152 single episodes that were completely missing was on. Over the years in sometimes strange and mysterious ways 55 of these episodes have been rediscovered leaving 97 undiscovered.

“Never Give Up, Never Surrender!”

OK that title comes from the wrong sci fi fandom, but it describes Doctor Who fans to a T. Back in the pre-VCR days some fans loves their shows so much that they would record the episode on tape so they could at least listen to it again whenever they wanted. Some at least of these recordings have been collected giving someone very smart the idea of “restoring” these episodes. If you can’t find the real thing, you could at least make use of those sound only recordings of the original episodes.

Using knowledge of the characters actions and facial expressions, publicity stills and fragmentary existing footage efforts were put together to fill the gaps in some existing stories creating animated visuals to go with the sound. That’s what the “missing, but animated” notations mean on the list I linked to in the last section.

Movies versus Episodes

Traditionally Doctor Who was broken into story arcs that would stretch over weeks. That was a familiar format on dramatic radio shows where you would follow a storyline for a few weeks before the show moved on to another story. Doctor Who episodes were traditionally shown in 30 minute episodes. A single story might have as few as 1 or as many as 12 week’s episodes. More recent efforts show these arcs of episodes strung together in one big movie. For instance right now PBS stations around the country are showing the Tom Baker “movies.” There’s a bit of pacing problem with that. It swoops to a cliffhanger every 30 minutes instead of having one long arc besides having to deal with the tags. NuWho abandoned this entirely have self-contained or two parters of roughly 50 minutes each.

“The Power of the Daleks” Format

So the big event was the debut on the big screen of the storyline or “movie” of a second Doctor episode that had been entirely lost. Taking a sound track (and either it was exceptionally well recorded on a very high end machine or they did a near miraculous job of cleaning it up) and adding animation for the entire story arc of the six episode “The Power of the Daleks.”

The animation was a little different than what I was expecting. I thought they’d do it in color, but nope it was gray tones all the way through. I also thought they would maybe drop in what footage they had or at least a little preview that showed what the characters really looked like from existing footage. It’s all animation though.

The Daleks themselves are 100% plus spot on. They were just perfect and you couldn’t want more from a Dalek. You saw them using their suckers for something other than helping push doors open. The voice was terrific especially when they tripped themselves up being sneaky “Daleks are bet…different than humans.”

The people while they still looked like themselves were animated in a 1970s comic book style. The backgrounds were great, the clothes and hairstyles reflected publicity stills perfectly, but their movement was marionette like at best. A few more face close up shots when they were moving might have looked better. Their face movements or slight movements when standing talking looked much better.

The First Regeneration and Reflecting Backward

This was the first episode of the second Doctor and shows the very first regeneration of the Doctor. This brilliant idea kept the series going, but it was a new idea to viewers and the writers don’t have the details we know about the process done yet. They do a very nice analysis of how they did this.

I also think they reflected back some of what has been developed in the meantime. For example the look of the Dalek creature inside the case is what has been established in nuWho not what we’d seen before. Also, the look of the effect of the Dalek ray is from more modern Who.

Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down

If you are Doctor Who fan enough to have watched some of the black and white episodes with the second Doctor, you’ll enjoy this. It does take a bit to get used to the style of animation of the people, but it’s definitely worth watching. If you don’t already know the second Doctor’s facial expressions and how he moves I think you can safely give this a miss. I’m looking forward to seeing it come out on DVD, especially to hear the commentary tracks which looked really good in the Making of special.

Let me know what you think.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

 

 

TV Show Castle Finale

Should Have Stopped With Season Finale Last Year

I’m torn over the Castle finale. I like the show so I’m sorry it’s over, but as with the last season of The Dukes of Hazzard, as MUCH as I liked the show, if this was the best they could come up with they were totally out of ideas and it was time to end it.  There are several shows over the years that were, I felt, cancelled well before their time and even did my bit to try and get them another year. There were some that succeeded and in the case of several, like Due South, I was sorry the movement succeeded when I saw that extra year. Castle is another that, as much as I enjoyed the few bright spots (Alexis and Haley with the detective agency, getting a peek at Ryan with his daughter, and the few bits of Caskett happy together) I would have been happier if they ended with the final show last season which I really think would have been one of the best written series finales ever. They should have taken that as the bow that they clearly thought it was when writing it and left on a high note. This was by FAR the weakest season of Castle. I spent all season thinking back to that episode and really there was nothing that convinced me we shouldn’t have just left the story there. I really won’t have minded if this entire season had been some kind of stupid dream like Dallas (which I was sorry for in that case I really liked the dream year better than the one after the do over). I’m sure they won’t, but I hope they’ll leave this last season out of syndication.

Kate Beckett and Rick Castle

A Weak Season

Undoing the Braxston explanation for Kate’s mother’s death after building years on that foundation was stupid and just reeked of an “Oh, HELP! we’ve got another year to fill and we tied it all up, we’ll just have to desperately grab at something.” Kate not telling Rick or Ryan or Espo that there was another Big Bad was both insulting to them and stupid because how were they able to finally deal with the first time? By working as a team. What is one of the things people like best about this series? The interaction of the team. Yes, isolating and destroying long established connections while creating insta ones (hello, woman Espo “really” loves who’s a criminal), is exactly what you want to do to keep a long running show on longer.~ (That’s a sarcasm mark if you don’t know.
Captain Gates not even getting a goodbye episode was also a slap to her and to fans right at the beginning of the season, so she was beyond reach for the team, but the others should have been involved. I don’t mind a “sneaking around because we can’t let people know we’re together” story, but they didn’t do it well and they never really resolved it. After Kate comes clean to Rick you really can’t tell they aren’t together except for a couple short scenes where they seem suddenly remember and decide to drop a line that they aren’t together. Ryan and Espo’s explanation of all this – which didn’t come from either Castle or Beckett – didn’t include that the break up had been staged, neither did Martha or Alexis’s at least on screen. Frankly it never did make sense. People knew she was connected to Castle, etc. anyway and what about her father? How did she protect him? The whole thing just seemed like a desperate attempt to come up with something, anything different.

Flash Ahead Scene

I did like the flash ahead end scene. You could tell it was tacked on and the part with the empty room was strange and the last set of voiceover lines at the end aren’t I would have picked, but I didn’t take them as an affront like the critic in the review linked at the bottom. I’d have liked Castle bringing the kids to Senator Beckett’s office (since that much of the rest of future guy’s prediction came true that should), but I’ll take what we got. (If you don’t remember, see note 1 at end)
Personally I’d have rather they cut that whole end apartment bit at the end of the episode right before the tag, especially them pretty much being in the position from the happy poster for the series when it cut to black. I think that would have been a horrible end, not just for the series, but even for the season. Who wants to see Caskett shot and crawling for each other? The instinct to reach each other was nice, but that’s not what I watched Castle for.

Worst Finales Ever

While I think it was a weak season, I do think that tag saved it from being a terrible show finale. In my opinion a terrible show finale ruins the rest of the show. If we had a season where Kate is either dead or in an unseen hospital bed, that would have ruined the show. If we saw them together in what was probably both shot dead with the surety that either Martha or Alexis would walk in on the scene THAT would have ruined the series for me. This has this bad part, but we eventually get to where we want to be. (See Note 2)
How I Met Your Mother
The review (same one linked to below) calls this a terrible finale and also slams the one from How I Met Your Mother. I actually liked the How I Met Your Mother finale because it really pulled tight  your perceptions so you could suddenly see throughlines for the entire series that looking back you can see were there the whole time. It made me want to watch the whole series again to see those lines.
Who’s the Boss?
Sometimes shows are ruined to the point where I don’t even want to watch again the other episodes I had liked. Probably the worst series ender for me was Who’s the Boss? after watching them demonstrate for 8 seasons how right Tony and Angela were, instead of marrying or at least engaging them off, they decide that they never were meant to be together romantically, never would be, and were “really just friends.” This was deliberately done thinking it would help the show remain popular in syndication. Why I’ll never know because I can’t sit through 2 minutes of any episode now without getting so mad about the series ending I have to turn away.
Quantum Leap
The Quantum Leap finale ( “Mirror Image – August 8, 1953”) was another series ruiner. We watched Sam jump through history helping people and every so often, not to help himself, but to help others, they’d do something that would nudge his life into a better place too. By the end of season 5, Sam seemed to be prepped to go home and get the reward of his improved life while he would continue to help people, probably from his own secure spot in time. Instead they sent him off on some obscure higher plane where he had to leave Al behind and they specifically say on screen “Dr. Sam Beckett Never Returned Home.”  I’m not the only person who hasn’t gotten over it.
Life on Mars
Finally Life on Mars (American version — the British version was different, but not a lot better) is the story of a detective from the 2000s that suddenly finds himself operating out of his same squad room in the 1970s.  The series is a combination of police procedural, cultural comparisons between the decades, and all sorts of little hints about what’s really going on. Is he in a coma and hallucinating? Is he being forced into this reality by drugs or mind control? Is he having to revisit this time to make peace with his life (specifically his father)? Is this heaven and/or purgatory?
The big reveal is it’s a computer glitch. He was really an astronaut on his way to Mars in the future and to keep them busy and well rested the crew was all put in stasis with a program of their choice running as an immersive experience. They could pick about anything and the computer would play it interacting with them. He had chosen that 2000s cop and a glitch had knocked him into the 1970s since the computer had that information as well and he really believed he was that 2000s cop so everything went wrong. So absolutely nothing we saw actually happened except his developing feelings for the cute blonde girl who turned out to really be the commander of the mission.
I still can’t believe they pulled things out from under us like that, but on the plus side it handed me one of the best ever conversation starters. If you could pick anything like that where you couldn’t really be hurt and could be literally anyone, anywhere, anytime, any space, where would you spend your two years? I’ve gotten some great responses.

Review Mentioned Above:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/fien-print/castle-series-finale-strikes-a-894699

NOTE 1: The Castle episode is “Time Will Tell” posits a time travel story where someone from the future comes back to destroy the world and someone else follows to stop him. Of course our realistic friends think this is crazy, except for Castle who kind of believes it’s possible especially when the man who claims to be the person to stop it, Simon Doyle, disappears almost in front of his eyes.

According to TV line Simon goes on to  “reveal that Rick and Kate do in fact marry, then have three kids. In the future, also, it’s Senator Beckett, while Castle has put mystery novels behind him to pen ‘serious literature.’ Beckett all episode writes off Simon as a crackpot, yet stops him from revealing the kids’ names.” In the flash ahead they also have 3 kids, a daughter who must be about 6 and twin sons about 4 seven years in the future.

NOTE 2: One final bit about the Castle finale I really don’t appreciate them hooking that grisly image to “Sunshine Day.” I hope I can get that out of my head now.

NOTE 3: I’d say the first of my top 2 favorite endings where the reference to his last show in the Newhart (which kept going in the Bob Newhart reunion special where they hint that it was that show that wasn’t real after all). Second, is I Married Dora an underrated farce with an ending you’d have to know the show to get, but was absolutely hilarious. “I knew you couldn’t leave me.” –” Nope. We’ve been cancelled!”

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Mentions November 2015

PilgrimIn addition to the post about me, this month I want to share an article I wrote for the official Little House on the Prairie website.

Uthoff, Sarah. “Thanksgiving and Laura Ingalls Wilder.” Little House on the Prairie. n.d. Web. 18 November 2015.

http://littlehouseontheprairie.com/thanksgiving-laura-ingalls-wilder

(Note: This was published in mid-November 2015, but not dated on page. )

Settle, Kammie. “THE LIBRARIANS: Flynn Finds His ‘Bestie’.” scifi4me. 26 November 2015. Web. 27 November 2015.
http://scifi4me.com/?p=47605

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote: People Are Bad At Remembering Words

From time to time I offer a post with a quote I want to be able to find again. Usually it’s something true and clever and makes you think. Today’s entry is quite a bit longer than my normal quotes and is from the hilarious commentary blog Dark Shadows Every Day. Its author, Danny Horn, offered this recently as part of his commentary on episode #759.

Because our memory is not as good for speech as we think it is. When you finish watching a movie, you might be able to recall a short catchphrase, or a joke that was especially funny — but even then, you’re probably going to get the words slightly wrong.

If you really want to remember some dialogue, you have to watch the movie again, this time anticipating the lines and marking them in your head as “important, keep in long-term memory.” Then you probably have to repeat them a couple times if you want them to stick.

That’s why we live in a world of misquotes. Humphrey Bogart never said “Play it again, Sam,” and Clint Eastwood didn’t say “Are you feeling lucky, punk?”

Beam me up, Scotty. Houston, we have a problem. Why don’t you come up and see me some time? Top of the world, Ma! Luke, I am your father. Practically every famous movie quote is wrong, because people are bad at remembering words.

Find the rest of the post here:
http://darkshadowseveryday.com/2015/10/31/episode-759

For further insight into the world of wrong quotes check out Quote Investigator.
http://quoteinvestigator.com

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Storm Chasing

Storm Chasing is when people with at least basic training chase thunderstorms looking for tornadoes and other severe weather. While the way the public most often sees them is through the video footage that is played on the news that is not their most important role. They report what they see to the National Weather Bureau so they can put out the appropriate warnings. This Iowa Public Television video interviews a storm chaser and shows you how they do it and gives some samples of what they see.

While the main focus of my podcasts are history and literature, I have a second set of 30 minutes episodes where we look at travel called Travel Times. I find someone who does something unusual for their vacations. Previous episodes have ranged from everything from Civil War Re-enacting to visiting Trekfest. This episode I talk with Michelle Martin, director of the Little House on the Prairie Museum, about storm chasing.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2012/02/22/travel-times-storm-chaser

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Walnut Grove Roving Reports 2014

Plum Creek at Eye Level
Plum Creek at Eye Level

My podcast features several kind of episodes. One of those is when I’m on a Laura trip or after I set up a Roving Report to let everybody know what’s happening. Here are the two I did for my trip to Walnut Grove for the 40th Anniversary Little House on the Prairie TV Show Reunion in July 2014. You can stream them from the links below or you can download them for free on iTunes under podcasts at the link below:

http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/trundlebedtales-blog-talk/id412309121

Remember to keep an eye out for future episodes. You can stream episodes live and enter the chatroom here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales
During live shows you can also call in to listen via phone or to ask a question or make a comment at  (714) 242-5253 or toll free 1-877-633-9389.

Roving Report Walnut Grove 2014 Part 1
Originally Aired July 25, 2014
Reporting live from Laura Ingalls Wilder Country check in with our reporter Sarah Uthoff as she has journeyed to Walnut Grove MN for the 40th Anniversary “Little House on the Prairie” cast reunion.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2014/07/25/roving-report-walnut-grove-2014-part-1

Roving Report Walnut Grove 2014 Part 2
Originally Aired August 30, 2014
Home from Laura Ingalls Wilder Country check in with our reporter Sarah Uthoff as she reports on the rest of her journey to Walnut Grove MN for the 40th Anniversary “Little House on the Prairie” cast reunion.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2014/08/30/roving-report-walnut-grove-2014-part-2

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.