Quote: Back when it was spelled publick

“People were making stuff up and foisting it on the public back when it was spelled publick. Ye olde fake news, you might say.” – Gregory S. Schneider

The fake news that haunted George Washington.” Washington Post. 10 April 2017. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/04/10/the-fake-news-that-haunted-george-washington/?utm_term=.78d63ebc65b1 Accessed 2 May 2017.

Whenever people talk about all fake news today and how it’s a brand new thing, I know they haven’t read much history. False stories printed as fact date back to the Colonial era of this country. In the 18th and 19th century most large cities would have two newspapers one for each party and you would barely recognize the same news as it was carried in the two papers.

For all the fuss kicked up about the “new” term fake news (new as in approximately 1890), people have always used made up stories, or at least their own political slant on them, to try to sway opinion. I highly recommend reading both the article the quote is from and this one about people’s ideas about science and where they get them.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

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Quote: Best Lack All Conviction

“The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.” – Bertrand Russell

O’Toole, Garson. “The Best Lack All Conviction While the Worst Are Full of Passionate Intensity.” Quote Investigator. 4 March 2015, quoteinvestigator.com/2015/03/04/self-doubt. Accessed 9 January 2017.

Why I’m Citing Quote Investigator

I first found this quote in a list of book quotes that were sent around, but even librarians when they are looking for something cool sometimes fall pray to accepting an attribution without checking. The library didn’t have the source I wanted to check and it wasn’t in the ones we did, so I checked with Quote Investigator that is a thoroughly reliable source that does in-depth searching on quotes to find out who said what.

“The problem with internet quotes is that you cant always depend on their accuracy” -Abraham Lincoln, 1864

Which ironically enough travels around without attribution.

People Who Know Least Tend to Win Arguments

The trouble with knowing a lot about a subject or even similar subjects is that it allows you to see gray areas, shades of meaning, times when things that aren’t generally the rule might in fact happen. That means that in any argument or conversation the people who truly understand the subject will tend to hedge. They will be able to see the nuances and nuances are terrible for convincing people.

The World Isn’t Flat

Unfortunately people who only know one thing or THINK they know one thing will be very sure about that one thing, after all it’s all they know. They can’t admit they’re wrong and they don’t understand enough about it to see the different sides.

For example:

Person A: “The world is flat.”

Person B: “Well, it may APPEAR flat due to…..”

Person A: [Snorts] “Of course it’s flat any fool can see that, use your EYES! [To third person who doesn’t know anything about it] You can SEE it looks flat, can’t you?”

Who is going to convince that third person?

Sometimes You’re Wrong

Wrong ideas are often short, simple, easily explained. That makes them easier to win arguments, but you shouldn’t let them convince you.

So make it a practice to believe….or at least seriously consider…6 impossible things before breakfast…to paraphrase Alice in Wonderland. Or to follow Gibbs’s Rule #51 “Sometimes you’re wrong.” I think that’s his most important rule for everyday life. I say it to myself daily, “Sometimes you’re wrong.” You may not win arguments, but you’ll understand things much better.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+ LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote: We never really fixed it (Civil War)

Reenactors at Ushers Ferry
Reenactors at Ushers Ferry

From time to time I offer a post with a quote I want to be able to find again. Usually it’s something true and clever and makes you think. Today’s quote comes from a video about re-enacting and how Civil War battle sites (long left as either farm fields or left alone just because of the lack of development in the areas where they were fought) are now falling prey to development at a rapid rate.

Why They Fight: Civil War Re-enactors and the Battle over Historic Sites

The video features images of reenactors juxtaposed with battle sites now turned into things like fast food restaurants when people fought and died there and the future of the country was decided.

This quote comes from one of the reenactors.

“We had a catastrophic event as a nation. We shared this experience as a whole. It decimated the lives of so many people. And then we didn’t really fix it, even now….we’re still in some ways fighting it.”

I think that is really true. The Civil War is one of the wars we talk about most in America, but most people don’t know a lot of accurate information about it or precisely what happened afterwards. I think it would change the worldview of a lot of Americans if we did. Many forces that effect what we do, say, and think come directly from the Civil War and by understanding that we could better move forward.

I would highly recommend the book Lies Across America by James W. Loewen.

Learn more about why the Civil War is Still Important.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote: People Are Bad At Remembering Words

From time to time I offer a post with a quote I want to be able to find again. Usually it’s something true and clever and makes you think. Today’s entry is quite a bit longer than my normal quotes and is from the hilarious commentary blog Dark Shadows Every Day. Its author, Danny Horn, offered this recently as part of his commentary on episode #759.

Because our memory is not as good for speech as we think it is. When you finish watching a movie, you might be able to recall a short catchphrase, or a joke that was especially funny — but even then, you’re probably going to get the words slightly wrong.

If you really want to remember some dialogue, you have to watch the movie again, this time anticipating the lines and marking them in your head as “important, keep in long-term memory.” Then you probably have to repeat them a couple times if you want them to stick.

That’s why we live in a world of misquotes. Humphrey Bogart never said “Play it again, Sam,” and Clint Eastwood didn’t say “Are you feeling lucky, punk?”

Beam me up, Scotty. Houston, we have a problem. Why don’t you come up and see me some time? Top of the world, Ma! Luke, I am your father. Practically every famous movie quote is wrong, because people are bad at remembering words.

Find the rest of the post here:
http://darkshadowseveryday.com/2015/10/31/episode-759

For further insight into the world of wrong quotes check out Quote Investigator.
http://quoteinvestigator.com

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote: “Rewind a book”

There is a group that is promoting people to model reading, by saying what they are reading on Friday either on Facebook or Twitter. Here is their website for more information. http://fridayreads.com

They tweet prompts to get people to respond. A tweet they made Friday, April 27, 2012 read:

“It’s so much fun to hit “rewind” on a book. I always learn so much rereading the pages.”

I love to re-read books, which my mother never can understand so I loved that one. Hope you enjoyed it too.

Quote: “What’s popular…”

The November 1. 2008 issue of Library Journal features a review of a new search engine called Hakia. It weights according to content and context rather than popularity and relevancy (as does Google).  Instead it considers peer-reviewed information, commercial bias, currency of content, and source authenticity and has a section called credible sites that are identified by real librarians. So far those are limited to the environment and health, but plans are in the works to expand them to other areas.

COO Melek Paulatkonak of Hakia gave this great quote “What’s popular may not be credible, and what’s credible may not be popular.” A true quote and one well worth thinking about. (p. 22)