Happy Halloween 2019

Me as Laura and my brother as Fonzie

Have a Happy Halloween with The Henry Ford.

Check out a Bogie Book for yourself!

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at her photos, and find her on   Facebook  ,   Twitter ,   LinkedIn ,   SlideShare,   and Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Train at Henry Ford

I love trains. I love The Henry Ford/Greenfield Village. So in short I LOVE this video. I can even tie in a Walt Disney connection because when Walt was first really getting into trains and starting to think about creating Disneyland one of the places he visited was Greenfield Village. If you go there, I think you can see where he got some of his ideas.

This less than 4 minute video is from The Henry Ford‘s video series, Innovation Nation. It looks at the history of Cabooses. Do you know exactly what a Caboose does?

Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help? Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, look at her photos, and find her on  Facebook ,  Twitter ,   LinkedIn ,  SlideShare, and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Harvesting Wheat at Henry Ford

During the 19th century in the Midwest being a successful farmer meant that you had a successful wheat farm. Every place Charles Ingalls established a farm he was growing wheat.

Wheat
Wheat

In Little House in the Big Woods they describe harvesting wheat with a cradle (a scythe with wooden spokes to catch the wheat as it was cut), but both Pa and Father Wilder were interested in new technology so they go the new equipment as they could afford as it came out. This is harvesting with a reaper.

Man Reaping with a Cradle
Cyrus Hall McCormick: Reaper Man Illinois Periodicals Online – Northern Illinois University448 × 324Search by image This farmer is using a cradle to cut wheat. Until the advent of the reaper, harvesting wheat was done by hand with implements like the one shown here. Linked

Wheat Today and Yesterday

In old photos you often see wheat in shocks. In order to build a good shock you need taller wheat than is commonly grown today. As there is less need for straw the stem is waste and takes extra nutrients and water to grow so wheat has been bred to be shorter.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

October 2016 Laura Ingalls Wilder Events

October is a slower month, but there is still events going on.

Sarah on Ingalls Homestead
Sarah on Ingalls Homestead

Burr Oak IA

Find out more about their events.

Fall Fest and Used Book Sale October 10, 2016 – 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Vinton IA

Dedication of Cemetery Marker for Blind School Students – Sunday, October 16, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. at Evergreen Cemetery, 1002 E 10th Street, Lot 31, Vinton, Iowa.

Malone/Burke NY

Columbus Day weekend, October 8-10. Regular admissions for tours will be in effect. Hours will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Monday, and 12 to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Last tour begins promptly at 3 p.m. all days.
http://www.mymalonetelegram.com/mtg05/almanzo-wilder-homestead-extends-tour-season-20161001

The Henry Ford – Dearborn, Michigan

Just copying in because kind of complicated. Find the details at:
https://www.thehenryford.org/current-events/calendar/lauras-little-town-spring

  • October 1 – October 30, 2016 (Friday – Sunday)
  • Time: 11:30am, 12:30pm, 1:455pm, & 2:45pm
  • Length: 15 minutes
  • Location: Near Scotch Settlement School, Main Street Historic District

Meet young Laura Ingalls before she became a teacher in this engaging 15-minute show celebrating Little Town on the Prairie, which has its 75th anniversary this year. Hear some of Laura’s favorite stories about her family’s time in DeSmet, South Dakota including the return of Nellie Oleson and the first time she met Almanzo Wilder.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her onFacebookTwitterGoogle+ LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Historic Cookbooks at the Henry Ford

As I’ve recently mentioned the Henry Ford is a pretty wonderful place. They have a terrific research collection and sadly while I have not gotten to go digging around it in myself, they have answered several questions for me which I greatly appreciate. Their archivist recently do a blog post giving a  general description of cookbooks in their collection. While probably not the most impressive cookbook collection (I can think of two others just off the bat), it’s a collection with both breadth and depth and well worth the time and interest of an historic foodways researcher. Read the description below:

http://blog.thehenryford.org/2012/11/food-in-the-library-cookbooks-in-the-benson-ford-research-center/

If you are just interested in the recipes themselves or can’t get to Michigan, don’t despair! They have created an online database of historic recipes they call their Recipe Bank, dip in and find recipes from the 1700s to the 2000s. I wish it was a bit more searchable, but there is plenty here to interest any history minded cook.

http://www.thehenryford.org/food/recipebank.aspx

The Henry Ford and Greenfield Village

Colonial Williamsburg – The Henry Ford of the East Coast

All the while I was growing up I heard about Colonial Williamsburg. I saw it on morning news shows, children’s shows would have special episodes set there, and the Bobbsey Twins even set a mystery there (The Red, White, and Blue Mystery – seriously read it before you go. I read about everything I could get my hands on before I finally got to visit Colonial Williamsburg and this did a better job of preparing me for my visit then any of the handbooks and travel guides I read.)[NOTE: Last time I said so, I was encouraged to read the newest one for children and the newest one for adults. I’ve bought them, but haven’t read them yet.-  2016]

Shhhhh! You Never Hear About The Henry Ford

On the other hand, I don’t think I had more than a vague idea that Greenfield Village existed. I remember checking out a 15 minute video from the Iowa City Public Library years ago and that was my first real hint of the richness that makes up The Henry Ford. Henry Ford had the wonderful idea, really well before his time, to collect as complete as possible full sets of everyday items, sleighbells, sad irons, lightbulbs, etc. And added things of cultural importance (The On the Road With Charles Kuralt Bus, the Weinermobile) and things related to great people (the chair Lincoln sat in at Ford’s Theater, Rosa’s Park’s bus, Edison’s last breath, Luther Burbank’s shovel – Yes, you should know that name, look him up).

ALHFAM

What really hooked me was when I visited during the Association of Living History Farms and Museum conference one year.  I was overawed by what a great collection and a great experience it was and have since been collecting articles and books on The Henry Ford ever since. It’s been a fascinating pursuit. This video is just a small tease at what they have to offer.

Laura Ingalls Wilder Connections

Laura fans should be interested for two main reasons. First, this is where Almanzo spent his time while Laura was giving her Book Week Speech. You can still see some of the same things Almanzo did and while he doesn’t seem to have left a record of his passing, he did tell people that the lunch wagon, where you can still get a meal, provided a better meal at a better price than he could get in Mansfield.

Second, Laura fans will also want to take note that Bill Kurtis, journalist and co-owner of the Little House on the Prairie Museum site in Independence, narrates this 12 minute film.

A smaller bonus reason is that Rose Wilder wrote a biography on Henry Ford Rose Wilder wrote a biography on Henry Ford, I own a copy, do you?

UPDATED October 9 2016: I added the headings and a few links when I reblogged.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Why is the Civil War Important Today

The Henry Ford Museum recently hosted a speaker on why the Civil War is important today. Many thoughts have turned to the Civil War as the 150th anniversary dates are rolling around, 1862-2012. That was no doubt why they chose this subject now. However, as the program itself shows we’re still impacted by the Civil War and its surrounding events today. I think you could actually add to the list, but I felt it was interesting on it’s own. Filmed in The Henry Ford auditorium (it’s a very beautiful room), unfortunately there were clearly issues with the filming. But they’ve shared the entire speech broken up into parts on YouTube. Here they are in order with my notes for important points you might be looking for. I enjoyed it. I hope you do too. The notes are above the link they describe.

Joshua Chamberlain, Famous Words, Famous Faces Famous Women

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ybMYxb9ttk [Part 2]

Famous Women, A Southern Lady’s Story, War Politicians,Government Influence,Technology

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIHYjHlO1Zk [Part 3]

Photography, 1:30 Train, 3:00 Medicine, 7:50 Holidays

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7GMcrJxOsk [Part 4]

0:00 Longfellow – I Heard the Bells 1:46 ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas – Thomas Nast Santa Claus 4:10 Art in Civil War 5:35 Civil War Music

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzyRC6OQo5Q [Part 5]