Historic Clothes with Micarah Tewers

Now I don’t really know who Micarah Tewers is, but based on her number of YouTube followers maybe I should? However, her video popped up as one of my suggested YouTube videos and I watched it.

It doesn’t look like she does a lot of historic clothes – and she definitely doesn’t take proper care to make them like they did historically – BUT she has apparently spent a lot of time learning the history of clothing and being able to quickly improvise a look.

Little Women

Now I should admit right here – I do NOT like Little Women. I have such major issues with the second part of book 1 that I couldn’t bear to read anymore of the series (seriously MAJOR issues). So while I adore Lousia Mae Alcott (read Eight Cousins and Rose in Bloom – why doesn’t anybody make THEM into movies?) I do NOT like any version of Little Women.
So it’s strictly from the historic clothing bent that I watched this video and I think Tewers makes some very good points that you should think about with your historic Laura clothes. While as a Laura fan you might be looking for a general pioneer look and not willing to expend much time or money on a Laura dress for valid reasons, I think some of the errors she points out are definitely things you could easily avoid.
(She also make some very fair points in passing about the live action movie remake of The Beauty and the Beast.)

Follow Up with Jane Austen

She doesn’t do historical fashion as a rule, but she did one other historical costume video that I found.
I wish she’d do some more historic clothing. It’s just fun to watch her sew and make snarky comments.
Sarah S. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many times at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. She is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic, and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. How can you help?  Attend one of her programs,  schedule one  yourself,  watch her videos,  listen to her podcast,   look at her photos, and find her  on   Facebook ,   Twitter ,     LinkedIn ,     SlideShare,   and  Academia.edu . Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and former director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Giant Strides in One-Room School Playgrounds

After I read this article in the Wed., May 11, 2016 issue of The De Smet News, I knew I wanted to share it. Even within my generation playground equipment has disappeared, maybe for better, maybe for worse. Some things disappeared even before then. One was the Giant Strides. You hear references to a Giant Stride around one-room schools, but I self see first hand accounts, so I was very excited to find such an account.  Here is the Giant Strides part of the article where Donna Palmlund describes riding on one republished with permission from The De Smet News.

“The ‘Maypoloe of Death’ and Other Memorable Playground Moments” by Donna Palmlund

I was looking at an online photography group’s page recently and saw a photo of an abandoned country schoolhouse with a couple of pieces of playground equipment – one that the photographer could only identify. It was a large metal pole with a device on top that looked like it might have rotated at one time.

It brought back memories of the “giant strides” or what I called “the Maypole of death” on my own school playground in Carthage. This contraption consisted of a tall pole with several metal chain “ladders” attached to it. Children would grab on to a rung on one of the “ladders” and run around the pole so fast that they would lift off the ground and spin around in a circle as though they were flaying. It was not for the faint of heart.

There were usually half a dozen or more kids riding on the giant strides at any given recess. I normally tried to avoid ti, but my more adventurous playmates talked me into trying it a few times. Once should have been enough.

I have coordination and strength issues and I was not always able to keep my grasp on the ladder, or, for that matter, run around in a circle without tripping. So I was usually the kid sitting in the dirt getting hit in the head with a swinging ladder or someone else’s feet.

I was also a lightweight back then, and the heavier kids, who had more momentum, would slam into us. I suspect that wasn’t always an accident.

-SSU again, Also find photos on someone’s pet history project.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Quote: We never really fixed it (Civil War)

Reenactors at Ushers Ferry
Reenactors at Ushers Ferry

From time to time I offer a post with a quote I want to be able to find again. Usually it’s something true and clever and makes you think. Today’s quote comes from a video about re-enacting and how Civil War battle sites (long left as either farm fields or left alone just because of the lack of development in the areas where they were fought) are now falling prey to development at a rapid rate.

Why They Fight: Civil War Re-enactors and the Battle over Historic Sites

The video features images of reenactors juxtaposed with battle sites now turned into things like fast food restaurants when people fought and died there and the future of the country was decided.

This quote comes from one of the reenactors.

“We had a catastrophic event as a nation. We shared this experience as a whole. It decimated the lives of so many people. And then we didn’t really fix it, even now….we’re still in some ways fighting it.”

I think that is really true. The Civil War is one of the wars we talk about most in America, but most people don’t know a lot of accurate information about it or precisely what happened afterwards. I think it would change the worldview of a lot of Americans if we did. Many forces that effect what we do, say, and think come directly from the Civil War and by understanding that we could better move forward.

I would highly recommend the book Lies Across America by James W. Loewen.

Learn more about why the Civil War is Still Important.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Most Important Event in American History

It isn’t the one you’d think. You might think Independence Day, when the Constitution or the Bill of Rights was ratified, the shots fired on Ft. Sumter, or Pearl Harbor, but Richard McMillan, Professor of History at Pierce College argues that the actual most important event in American history was the Spanish Armada attacking Great Britain [notice I didn’t include spoilers, do you know how it turned out? Informal poll comment one way or the other before watching the video :)]. Actually it’s also a pretty great description of what happened to the Spanish Armada complete with animation, so enjoy!

Are you convinced?

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

500 Cameras

One thing my Laura Ingalls Wilder building and most county history museums will have in common is a collection of old cameras. Yes, I must admit I’m a shutterbug and I love cameras of all types (see earlier references to my life goal of getting a real tintype taken of me). However, I think about the best collection of old cameras anywhere is the George Eastman museum. This video is a very quick introduction to the book they just put out on the history of photography. Both are called 500 Cameras. I watched the video and immediately decided I needed the book.

Astragal Press

For those of you interested in antiques, collectibles, and how-to do old-fashioned things, Astragal Press does original publications, re-prints of old catalogs, and carries publications that fit their mission. They carry a wide variety of subjects from things like The Rule Book about measuring tools to the 1895 Montgomery Ward & Co Catalogue to Kitchen Collectibles to The Backyard Blacksmith. Have fun poking around on their website.

http://www.astragalpress.com/index_astragal.htm