Tombstones in the Snow

Stone Before

Tonight I’m sharing a discovery I made a few years ago when I was trying to track down the records on the cemetery by our house (still didn’t succeed at that quest, but this was a pretty nifty discovery in the process). The best time I have found for taking photos of a tombstone is while there is snow on the ground, assuming it’s safe to travel there and that you already have the stone located so you aren’t poking around the snow.

This is what I did, these are before and after photos. Take a few handfuls of snow rub them into the letters carefully rubbing off any snow until it is level. Repeat until full.

This is the stone for two brothers. They owned our farm and one of them (I think the younger one) died by falling into a buzzsaw while building what is now our barn.

UPDATE: I don’t really have much of an update, but I wanted to include a link to this post since I still think is a pretty clever genealogy tip, so I thought I’d go ahead and add the signature block. This trick works best with darker stones, but can really help even for light one. Has anyone else tried it?

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Advertisements

Published by

trundlebedtales

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales striving to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Uthoff is a nationally known Laura Ingalls Wilder authority and has presented at five of the Wilder homesites, many conferences and numerous libraries, museums, and events around the Midwest. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

2 thoughts on “Tombstones in the Snow”

  1. Sarah, Thank you so much for sharing that with me. I don’t think I would have thought to do that. I wonder if using white chalk in the summer would also work – hadn’t thought of that before either.

  2. Reblogged this on Sarah's Notebook and commented:

    This isn’t one of my highest ranking posts, but I was looking for genealogy posts to link to and came across this. It works best when the snow is snowman packable. Hopefully we’ve seen the last of snow for this year, but I wanted to share it again anyway. Enjoy!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s