In the Kitchen With Laura July 2014

August 11, 2014

IMG_0044This the seventh in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about In the Kitchen With Laura. I’m finally caught up again and here is my post for July. In the Kitchen With Laura has continued to be a popular program this year. The photo above was taken during one of my programs. During the program we learn about Laura’s life and have the opportunity for hands on projects like making Ginger Water.

If it’s a really, REALLY hot day and you drink ice cold water, it might sound good, but the odds are you will get stomach cramps for your trouble. You could drink as much ginger water as you wanted though with no such problem. (My brother would say it’s because nobody would want to drink that much, but it really divides people over whether they like it or not.)

Ginger Water from Sarah Uthoff on Vimeo.

Ginger Water

3/4 cup packed brown sugar

1 tsp. powdered ginger

1/2 cup cider vinegar

1 quart cold water

1 tsp. baking soda

Add brown sugar and ginger to a pitcher and mix. Pour in cider vinegar mixing until they dissolve. Add cold water and stir. Add the baking soda right before serving, stirring well. After initial bubbling ends, you may add more baking soda to start it again. It may be kept overnight either on the counter covered or in a refrigerator. The continued chemical reaction will change the taste, but it will continue to work. It’s most effective though when freshly mixed. After the second day throw away any that is left and start over.

If you’ve never tried ginger water before start with a very small taste. People are very divided over whether they like it or not. I’ve given out maybe a 1000 tastes over the years and people are normally evenly divided between swallowing it down, but hating it and those who ask for more. At the extremes, you get a few spitter outters and a few recipe ask forers about every time you make a batch.

A drink of a very similar make up and purpose, but with a much more exotic name is Switchel. It was recently highlighted on a PBS cooking show.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Ozark Watch Mansfield Pageant

August 9, 2014

trundlebedtales:

Not a lot new to add here since this post is just from last year, it has been very popular. I’m still trying to get some of the folks behind the pageant to come on the podcast. I hope it works out soon. I’ll also point out that Phil Bennett who is one of those interviewed has commented on this post and also called in twice to my Laura Ingalls Wilder birthday episodes.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Mansfield Pageant

Mansfield Pageant

I mentioned that I was looking for a particular Ozark Watch episode and that’s how I found the ones about the Laura Ingalls Wilder Home and Museum in Mansfield’s future plans and the one on Rock Architecture, but I finally found the one I was looking for and this is it, it’s on the Ozark Mountain Players and Laura’s Memories Pageant.  The episode features four guests and talks about the history of the pageant. If you’ve only been to the pageants in Walnut Grove and De Smet, as great as they are, you’re missing out a great and totally different experience. I hope you can plan a trip to Mansfield during the pageant soon.

http://video.optv.org/video/2332656262

Opening scene repeats later in the episode until 1:04

Dale Moore the host does the introduction.

First 2 guests, Terry Spyres, the playwright, and Pat Allen, the composer and lyricist.

The pageant started in…

View original 421 more words

Travel Times Amana

August 7, 2014

IMG_0008 One of the subseries of my Trundlebed Tales podcast is a series about travel and hobbies called Travel Times. Sometimes I interview someone, but sometimes I just talk about something I know about and this is one of the later. Today you get the inside scoop of eating at the Amana Colonies in Iowa. It’s right off I-80 so anytime you passing through the state, plan a stop.

Utopian NOT Dystopian

Right now Dystopian fiction, stories about what happens after we destroy the world and how every thing will be a whole lot worse, are the literary trend (which is historically true in bad economic times), but in other, more hopeful days Utopian worlds were not only the rule in fiction, but people believed they could be created in real life. There were several attempts at Utopian colonies in North America, but one of the most successful was the Amana Colonies. The colonists came from Germany, started in New York, but later permanently settled in Iowa starting a cluster of villages that straddle two counties. Such colonies normally fall apart as the second generation comes up and is not as committed to the ideals, but that didn’t happen in Amana’s case.  They began in 1714 in Germany and it took the Great Depression of the 1930s and the overload it produced on their system designed to help even outsiders in need that ultimately made it obvious they couldn’t continue. Rather than give up entirely they stopped the practice of providing members with what they needed, broke up the communal kitchens, and formed a corporation. In 1932, the former practitioners became share holders in the various Amana businesses. While there are private businesses in Amana a good deal is still owned by the shareholders.

http://amanacolonies.com/pages/about-amana-colonies/history.php

Restaurants

While the Amana Colonies were still a Utopian colony, women assigned to cooking cooked in large communal kitchens strategically located throughout the group of communities. The food was German in origin. It was served family style (meaning full serving dishes were put on the table and passed, rather than individual portions being plated up) and there was lots of chance for refills if any of the serving dishes turned up empty. Today at the Amana Colonies the traditional restaurants still follow those same practices and hungry Iowans can tell you.

Although a combination of recent historical factors have driven several of the restaurants out of business from their high point, today three traditional style Amana restaurants remain:

Colony Inn Restaurant

741 47th Avenue Amana 319-622-3030

Ox Yoke Inn

4420 220th Trail Amana (800) 233-3441

Ronneburg Restaurant

4408 220th Trail Amana (888) 348-4686

At these three restaurants you can still order by the plate, but if you’re going to have the Amana experience go with someone else and order family style. Although the meat is very good, unless you have a huge appetite or just plan on taking the meat home with you, I’d see if you could get the sides alone. They are always more than enough to fill me up.

Other Things To Do in Amana

There are other restaurants in Amana, not the original type, but range from coffee houses that offer Italian style sodas to Breweries.

Woolen Mill

Woolen Mill

http://amanacolonies.com/pages/food-beverages.php

Amana is also a center for unique shopping opportunities. All sorts of unique stores are scattered throughout although the two best known are the Amana Woolen Mill (which still sells fine wool goods) and the Amana Furniture Store (which specializes in very fine wood furniture and wooden clocks). I myself always like to stop at the Kitchen store, but there are many all around town. There are also many small museums dedicated to individual parts of the Amana story, like the communal kitchens and the entire experience at the main museum.

Recognizing their current circumstances (high end chains in nearby Coralville, etc.) Amana makes sure to have an event going almost every weekend so there is plenty to do. Before you leave town be sure to drive by their famous Lily Pond.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2014/03/23/ep-20-travel-times-amana

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

August 2014 Laura Ingalls Wilder Events

August 5, 2014

WG Dolls 1During August check out these Laura Ingalls Wilder related events around the country. August seems to be a big time for Laura events so if I’ve missed one please let me know. I should have done this post first this month. We’ve missed a couple already, but I’ll include them anyway.

I’m still playing with the formatting of these posts. Do you like this look better? Would a list by calendar date be more helpful than by place? Please comment in how I can make these more useful to you.

Vinton IA

First Annual Mary Ingalls Society Pageant August 1-2, 2014

Keystone SD – Longtime Home of Carrie Ingalls Swanzey

No matter what day of the week it falls on, Keystone always does an event on Aug. 3rd, Carrie’s birthday

Genesee Country Village and Museum – Mumford, NY

Laura Ingalls Wilder Days Aug. 2-3, 2014

Laura Historian William T. Anderson will be speaking.

Mansfield MO

Laura’s Memories Pageant
Aug. 29-30, 2014 Look for more dates in September

Malone/Burke NY

Find their calendar list with more details here.

Cultural Festival- Fete Du Quebecois (NEW!) Aug. 23, 2014

And finally as a heads up for the beginning of next month

Herbert Hoover Presidential Library

Good news, I’m returning as speaker!

Laura Ingalls Wilder Remembered – Sept. 1, 2014

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

August 2014 Presentations

August 4, 2014
Presenting at Ottumw

Presenting at Ottumwa

While July is heavy for Laura Ingalls Wilder events, it tends to be quieter from programs (unless you are speaking at the events).  August also has a good chunk of events. I just have one program scheduled so far.

  • Corning Public Library  – Corning, Iowa – Packing Up – Tuesday, August 5, 2014 2:00 pm

But even if there isn’t a program scheduled near you, it’s not too late. If you’d like me to come present near you make sure to tell your local library, museum or civic group. I’m really excited about my “In the Kitchen With Laura” program for this summer. If you are looking for a program, check them out.  Learn more here:
http://www.trundlebedtales.com/programs.html

And check out my brochure:
Brochure2014pg1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Mentions July 2014

August 1, 2014

trading card 2014Our mentions posts are round ups of articles and mentions of Sarah Uthoff or Trundlebed Tales in the media from the previous month, plus sometimes some bonuses that I’ve just come across from earlier months.

Pepin Laura Days has launched a new website. They have included a PDF of me.
Sarah Uthoff

“Signs declare IBSSS as Mary Ingalls site.” I’m pictured with the Mary Ingalls Society board in the Cedar Valley Times.
http://www.communitynewspapergroup.com/vinton_newspapers/article_a517020a-137f-11e4-b5b8-001a4bcf887a.html

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Maytag Blue Cheese

July 30, 2014
Boji Blue Cheese Burger

Boji Blue Cheese Burger at Okiboji Grill

When you hear of Maytag and Iowa you are probably thinking about washing machines, but that shouldn’t be all you’re thinking about. The Maytag Corporation was an Iowa owned corporation for many years, but some sad mismanagement led to it being forced to sell out and restructure. A public outcry went up over a foreign company buying the proud American product and eventually it was sold to the Whirlpool Corporation.

From 2007: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-town-maytag-left-behind

Although the company shut down was a big blow to the town of Newton, it has come back strong and has a more diversified economy now. The brand continues to be produced and is owned by Whirlpool. Some are still manufactured in state at Amana, Iowa.

http://www.whirlpoolcorp.com/about/history.aspx

Blue Cheese Recipe Traces Back to ISU

In the 1930s, Fred and Robert Maytag inherited the farm from their father and looked for alternative products to increase the value of the milk from their herd of prize winning Holstein show cows on Maytag Dairy farm. They got in touch with the scientists at Iowa State University (ISU – Iowa’s land grant college) and together with the Maytag funding and ISU research they developed a way to make Blue Cheese not from goat milk, but instead from pastured Holstein milk. Commercial production started in 1941 and their patented process has become the standard for use in the American Blue Cheese market today.
https://www.cals.iastate.edu/content/department-animal-science-125th-points-pride (Read the third paragraph down)
http://www.maytagdairyfarms.com/aspx/bluecheese.aspx

Maytag Blue Cheese in Newton, Iowa

While the Maytag appliance company is gone, the Maytag Dairy Farm has remained producing around 1 million pounds of high quality Maytag Blue IMG_0042Cheese each year. The same family started both businesses, but the appliance company had become publicly traded while the dairy is still own by the Maytag family. Their Maytag Blue Cheese is used in many of the best restaurants in the region and available for purchased for your home use (if you don’t want to drive out to the farm take the exit off I-80 with the Jasper County Historical Society – not the one with gigantic race track – and head north up the hill, drive past the restaurants and stop at the convenience store/gas station in the mini-mall on the right hand side of the road, they have a display case of high quality cheese including Maytag Blue Cheese. – I know what it sounds like, but seriously this is the easiest place to get some without driving into Newton proper and they really do have an impressive assortment of various high quality cheeses). You can also enjoy a menu that features Maytag Blue Cheese at the Okiboji Grill restaurant right across the street from the mini-mall. Otherwise you can take the racetrack exit (there is lots of signage and you’ll see the huge structure to the south of I-80) and turn north instead and blue highway signs will direct you to the Maytag Dairy farm. Or you can buy it by mail through their website.

Take a tour around the farm:

NPR’s Story on Maytag Blue Cheese
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=424562

Cooking With Blue Cheese

Iowa Ingredient, the Iowa Public Television show that produced the video segment above, also did one with an Iowa chef about cooking with Maytag Blue Cheese.

Find the recipe they cook here:
http://www.iptv.org/iowaingredient/story.cfm/story/11845/iai_20140527_310_coffee_poached_pear_with_maytag

Find recipes from the Maytag Dairy Farm here:
http://www.maytagdairyfarms.com/aspx/recipes.aspx

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Schoolhouse Replica in Malone NY

July 25, 2014
Recreated Wilder Barns

Recreated Wilder Barns

Check out this radio news story from NPR. One of the improvements on the Almanzo Wilder Farm grounds has been the building of the one-room school replica. They just finished a successful fundraising campaign of $950 to add a belfry to the school and I realized I still hadn’t shared this news story so it seems like the perfect time.

http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/22602/20130826/a-little-schoolhouse-in-the-woods

Sadly they don’t give time codes, but this is interesting for this. The news story is from August 2013 and covers the event. Although it mentions celebrities Dean Butler (Almanzo Wilder) and Lucy Lee Flippin (Eliza Jane Wilder) who dedicated and appeared, the interview is with vice-president of the Wilder Association Ken Carre who was actually involved in the building. It’s a good and interesting interview. They are wanting to represent rural life in the “North Country” in the 1860s. Hops was the big cash crop, but there isn’t any evidence that James Wilder grew it. They address the fact that there are three possible schools as candidates for the one Almanzo attended and the downside to moving them that lead them to go the replica route. They based a lot of the school, especially on the interior, on a contract that they found for a nearby school that was built at the same town. They acknowledge schools were different in different areas. He talks about the 1920s is all of history because it’s what we remember and have photographs of bias. Carre also talks about the international appeal of the Little House series.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

In the Kitchen With Laura June 2014

July 23, 2014

This the sixth in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about my program In the Kitchen With Laura. I’m running late, but here is the entry for June. Chickens

Take a look at our farm chickens:

Butter and Egg Money

On just about any farm in the 19th and well into the 20th century, a lot of its cash flow during the course of the year (except when it was time to sell a crop or livestock) was from the money the women made selling butter and eggs. Sometimes this was just the extras from what the family produced chiefly for its own use, other times it was a major undertaking designed to be a cash crop. This money was commonly referred to a “Butter and Egg Money.” Read more here.

In Laura and Almanzo’s case at Rocky Ridge, they were definitely in it for the cash money. Laura had a goal of making $1 of pure profit per hen and she usually made it. A neighbor was quoted in the Missouri Ruralist as saying she could get eggs in the winter when no one else could.

Laura’s operation was a lot more advanced than what Ma had done on the homestead. She had a large flock and produced a large number of eggs for sale.  She was also interested in the improvement of operations and chicken breeds and served as head of the chicken department at the local fair.

Leghorn Chickens

There are many, many different chicken breeds. Take a look in the poultry barn next time you’re at a 4H fair and you’ll be amazed by the variety.

Check out the Poultry Barn during show prep at the Iowa State Fair in 2012:

Many chicken breeds are bred with a particular purpose in mind, for example Cornish Crosses are large meat birds that put on weight at and incredible speed. Laura raised Leghorns a breed which sadly lays white eggs instead of brown (we’re brown egg people at home). Laura chose the Leghorn because they are known for having a small body size (so they don’t eat much) and for being prodigious egg producers, both factors that I’m sure helped her towards her one dollar profit goal. The downside is that they have small bodies so they don’t produce a lot in the way of meat. If you’re wondering where you might have heard of that name before, think Warner Brother cartoons and Foghorn Leghorn (the human sized rooster who spoke like a southern colonel, the character was in part a parody of comic character named Senator Claghorn on the Fred Allen radio show).

Read more about Leghorns and other breeds. Click on the Ls to get to the Leghorn section.

An Introduction to Eggs

Iowa Ingredient host Charity Nebbe has put together a very well done introduction to eggs and their role in the kitchen and in your backyard.

Watch the video and see if you can find some brown shell eggs and try them out in your favorite baked good. Can you tell the difference?

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Trundlebed Tales Brochure Updated

July 21, 2014
Sarah at the Ingalls Homestead, Dressed as Old Laura

Sarah at the Ingalls Homestead, Dressed as Old Laura

I’ve just finished an update on my brochure, take a look! Remember Trundlebed Tales is more than just a blog, I have a website, YouTube channel, podcast, Twitter, Facebook, etc. and most importantly, I speak in person. If you want to hear me, be sure to pass this on to your local library, museum, or event.

Brochure2014pg1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 


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