Melissa Gilbert Book Tour

October 8, 2014
Melissa Gilbert Signing My Book

Melissa Gilbert Signing My Book

September 16, 2014,was the day Melissa Gilbert’s second book based on her connection to the Little House on the Prairie (TV Show) was released her My Prairie Cookbook: Memories and Frontier Food from My Little House to Yours. It’s a combination of 80 recipes from Gilbert’s personal collection and a series of short scrapbooks of behind the scenes stories and personal photos. She spent this day in Iowa, at the Cedar Rapids Public Library at 2 pm and at the Iowa City Public Library at 7 pm, with taking time for an hour long radio interview. I attended the Cedar Rapids Public Library show and roughly 250 people attended including some 30 who watched from a remote room. They sold out of the 95 cookbooks in 20 minutes.

From Iowa City Public Library

I saw the presentation at the Cedar Rapids Public Library live and got a copy of the recording from the Iowa City Public Library. Catch the repeats of her Iowa City visit on the local library’s public access television channel. I put together a news report on Gilbert’s visit to Cedar Rapids below.

Melissa Gilbert Visits the CRPL for The Prairie Cookbook Launch from Sarah Uthoff on Vimeo.

I watched a version of her presentation the US National Archives recently uploaded about Melissa Gilbert about her new Prairie Cookbook. Unfortunately both the host and Gilbert have some factual trouble near the beginning when talking about the real Laura and history. Then she steers into her own life and producing the show which is much more interesting. I especially like that she now refuses to sign copies of Laura’s books because as an author she thinks that is inappropriate, which I totally support. Gilbert also talks about her experience on Dancing With the Stars (which I hadn’t heard her do anywhere else). She talks a little bit about how the studio school was like a one-room school and how the other school children were mostly relatives of the cast and crew. Sean Penn and his brother were two of them because their father sometimes directed the show. She also answers what happened with Melissa and her brother Jonathan. She was asked about the Walnut Grove 40th Anniversary. Check out their press release which talks about the many Laura Ingalls Wilder connections with the National Archives including links and check out the video below:
http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2014/nr14-95.html

My Prairie Cookbook: Memories and Frontier Food from My Little House

In the US National Archives interview she mentions her appearance in Parade Magazine, here’s the link which includes one of her recipes:
http://parade.condenast.com/337314/walterscott/melissa-gilbert-dishes-on-her-favorite-recipes

Gilbert was also  interviewed on Talk of Iowa by Charity Nebbe. There is some repetition from the US National Archives video above, but also some great original stuff. My favorite bit is when she talks about the food on the show including KFC fried chicken and Dinty Moore Beef Stew.
http://iowapublicradio.org/post/actress-melissa-gilbert-life-after-little-house-prairie

UPDATE: If you couldn’t come to either of the shows in Iowa, check out this listing of her other stops around the country.
http://www.abramsbooks.com/myprairiecookbook/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Iowa One-Room School Workshop 2014

October 6, 2014
Exterior

Exterior

Once again it’s time for the annual one-room school workshop in Iowa. Every Fall a different location in Iowa is chosen and people from all over interested in one-room schools gather to learn more about one-room schools and tour area schools. While it’s in Iowa and hosted by Preservation Iowa, interested people from anywhere are welcome to register. The first day is presentation sessions (mostly brief highlights so there is always something different right around the corner). The second day is a tour of area one-room schools.

This year the workshop will be held in Kalona, Iowa at the Kalona Historical Village on Friday, October 10 and Saturday, October 11, 2014. The Kalona Historical Village is a multi-venue museum. They have a restored historic village, a building dedicated to local (especially Amish) history, a building of tractors and cars, and a quilt museum with a national reputation. Topics covered include: Amish one-room schools, Preserving schools through print and visual media, dealing with floods, finding country school antiques, among others.

Read the brochure and find registration information here:
Iowa Conf Brochure I-1 (Page 1)

Iowa Conf Brochure II-1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Preview The Songs

October 5, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I updated this when I put together the history of “Little House on the Prairie: The Musical” late last year, but it’s made up its way up to the most hits list. I hope you enjoy it.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Little House on the Prairie the Musical T-Shirt

Little House on the Prairie the Musical T-Shirt

Thanks to NPR, you can now hear some snippets of the “Little House on the Prairie” the musical, from the Guthrie. Also revealed is that a 40 city tour is currently being planned, but a prior Broadway run is still on the table.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=93644080

Learn more about the history of this production and listen to more of the songs on its website here:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/history-of-little-house-on-the-prairie-the-musical/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls…

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Mentions September 2014

October 3, 2014
Filming "Sons and Daughters of Thunder"

Filming “Sons and Daughters of Thunder”

Our mentions posts are round ups of articles and mentions of Sarah Uthoff or Trundlebed Tales in the media from the previous month, plus sometimes some bonuses that I’ve just come across from earlier months.

I’m most pleased that the current Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Pepin, Wisconsin is using one of my photos for their brochure:
http://lauraingallspepin.com/Websites/liwmuseum/images/Documents/LIWMS_brochure_6.10.14.pdf

My appearance at Pepin is briefly described in a Hen Scratches post:
http://henscratches.blogspot.com/2014/09/pepin.html

This is one I missed from August:
http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/people-can-talk-a-walk-on-the-wilder-side/article_f7e40dcc-f0ca-5683-84d7-d74bd043cada.html

Finally, an old story, but a good one that I realized I never shared from 2011:
“Laura Ingalls Wilder: Live from the Prairie.” Road Trips for Readers. July 27, 2011
http://www.roadtripsforreaders.com/2011/07/laura-ingalls-wilder-live-from-the-prairie-3/

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

October 2014 Presentations

October 1, 2014

For some reason October has been a very busy month this year. It’s not usually so busy, so it’s interesting. Fake Tintype7

  • One-Room School Program for classes October 6-7, 2014. (Not open to the public)
  • Iowa One-Room School Workshop sponsored by Preservation Iowa – Kalona, Iowa – Oct. 10-11, 2014 – Requires registration
  • Burt Activity Complex – Burt, Iowa – Packing Up – October 18, 2014 – 2 pm
  • One-Room School Program for classes October 20, 2014. (Not open to the public)
  • Good Hope Luthern Church sponsored by Titonka Public Library – General Laura Program – October 26, 2014 – 2 pm

But even if there isn’t a program scheduled near you, it’s not too late. October is pretty booked up, but there are still some slots in November and I’ve started taking bookings for 2015. If you’d like me to come present near you make sure to tell your local library, museum or civic group. I’m really excited about my “In the Kitchen With Laura” program and I’m starting work on “In the Schoolroom With Laura” for next year. If you are looking for a program, check them out.  Learn more here:
http://www.trundlebedtales.com/programs.html

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

In the Kitchen With Laura August 2014

September 29, 2014

This the eighth in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about “In the Kitchen With Laura.” Here is my post for August. “In the Kitchen With Laura” has continued to be a popular program this year.

2 Cookbooks

2 Cookbooks

One of the goals I have for the program is to have interactive experiences and share a little cooking knowledge. Another is to help share the stories of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life. In another way, you could say it was the story of these two cookbooks that are part of the show. We follow how learning to cook has shifted from an apprentice process to a science to a pleasure. It used to be that learning cooking was a very hands on affair. You learned through what basically was an apprentice method, studying at the side of someone who cooked or baked well and you learned how to make a relatively small number of dishes that were in a specific geographic and ethnic repertoire. When printed cookbooks came out they faced a challenge on how to pass on in a written form what had always been passed on by repeated demonstration. The results were not always good. The first American cookbook dates back to 1796 with Amelia Simmons and her American Cookery. To try and figure out exactly what the cookbook author was trying to tell you what to do was hard for both cooks at the time and cooks who revisit it and other books of the period. They assumed you’d already have a really high background knowledge of cooking and the types of recipes they are taking about.  One hundred years later Fannie Farmer had the idea that cooking should be more like a science than an art and that anyone who could read a recipe should be able to cook it and when she was given the job of re-doing The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook she totally redid it with these rules in mind. Coming out in 1896 it would revolutionize cooking. She also had a tendency to the fancy and to put sugar in a lot of things that you wouldn’t normally think of adding sugar too. Some people think Farmer has part of the blame for America’s sweet tooth. The book was such a success that Fannie Farmer became a byword for American cooks and they renamed her book simply The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. (She actually wrote a total of 6 cookbooks and countless magazine articles.)  Read more about her revolutionizing cooking here. And read more about the history of the book on Feeding America page. The book has run to many editions. As they say a camel is a horse designed by a committee and the number of editors over the years had left the book in poor shape. That was 11th edition. Then for the 12th edition food writer Marion Cunningham was brought on board. Her revamp of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook turned it around and restored its former luster. Her first version came out in 1979 and sold 400,000 copies its first year. She followed up with the 13th edition and once again a version of Fannie Farmer’s cookbook is considered a staple on kitchen shelves.

Read more about Marion Cunningham:
http://www.eater.com/2012/7/11/6565959/cookbook-author-marion-cunningham-dies-at-90

Find the 1896 reproduction version pictured above (note: there are several replica editions of the 1896 ed., this is the one that looks most like a period book cover, but the Dover edition has the best biographical essay on Farmer):
http://www.amazon.com/Original-Fannie-Farmer-Boston-Cooking/dp/B0032MW4IO/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411771102&sr=1-1&keywords=Fannie+Farmer+Replica

Or the current 13th edition:
http://www.amazon.com/Fannie-Farmer-Cookbook-Anniversary/dp/0679450815/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411771154&sr=1-1&keywords=fannie+farmer+cookbook+13th+edition

The second book was also revolutionary in its time. The modern editions of Joy of Cooking don’t differ that much from regular cookbooks, but the original one by Irma Rombauer was an entirely new take. In the beginnings of the Great Depression many formerly upper middle class women were forced to dismiss their maids and cooks and instead take on kitchen tasks on their own. Instead of trying to be scientific, Rombauer’s recipes were designed to be full of flair, but be as simple as possible to make (after all you didn’t want to LOOK like you had to fire your maid, but that you enjoyed cooking without giving up too much of your other activities). Women who had always had the job of cooking also took to the book wanting to add some of the fancy flair (like St. Martha of Bethany, the patron saint of cooking, slaying the dragon of kitchen drudgery on the front cover) into their homes for meals and for women’s group meetings. Reflecting Rombauer’s background there was also more of a cosmopolitan flavor and mixture of recipes to the book (of course at the time things like spaghetti and pizza were considered ethnic).  The original edition was self-published in 1931 (the reproduction of which is pictured above) and her negotiations to turn it into a professionally published book and keep control of the text did not go well. The family lost control and money due to the overpowering negotiations that she tried to handle herself. The first professional edition published by Bobbs-Merrill Company in 1936 or just about the time “In the Kitchen With Laura” is set.

Read more about it here:
http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/03/23/reviews/970323.23bronzt.html

The official history from The Joy of Cooking website:
http://www.thejoykitchen.com/all-about-joy/history-joy-cooking

Family history with the 75th Anniversary edition:
http://www.thejoykitchen.com/all-about-joy/75th-anniversary-edition-2006

Papers of the Rombauer Family Finding Aid:
http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00013

So one of the points I really want to people to take away from “In the Kitchen With Laura” is that Laura did’t stay a little girl. She grew up and had other experiences. Personally I think her years as a farmwife and club woman are just as interesting as her early years. She didn’t keep making long winter bread any more than she kept wearing her hair in braids. I don’t know for sure whether Laura actually owned either of these specific books, but I think she probably did or at least had some experience with some of their recipes as a recipe clipper/collector (see Laura Ingalls Wilder Country Cookbook). And I think by coming to this program you really get a feel for what it would have been like to be “In the Kitchen With Laura.”

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Council Bluffs and the Transcontinental Railroad

September 27, 2014

trundlebedtales:

UPDATE: This is no longer Lincoln’s Bicentennial year and the temporary exhibits are closed. There is still a lot of great Dodge and Lincoln information around Council Bluffs. Mostly for the update I’ve added current websites to some of the places I mentioned.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Gen. Dodge House

Gen. Dodge House

When I visited Council Bluffs for the first time I was really surprised by how many railroad connected sites there are around town. Council Bluffs was chosen by Abraham Lincoln himself to be the starting point of the Transcontinental Railroad.

At the top of the city is the General Grenville Dodge House. The house was quite elaborate and  showing how well Dodge did becoming a self-made man with the army, the railroad, and his various investment businesses around town. Dodge first came to Council Bluffs when he was 21 and it was his base of

Dodge in Close Up

Dodge in Close Up

operations for the rest of his life. A powerful general in the army during the Civil War, Dodge was chosen as chief engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad. His engineering and leadership skills led him to almost single handily drive the construction of the eastern part of…

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Little House in Simi Valley

September 25, 2014

Some of this information was originally published in my posts on the Beyond Little House site, but I thought it was worth republishing here with a few updates. Earlier this year the ranch made the news again when Carrie Ingalls twin Rachel Greenbush was married at the former Little House on the Prairie set in Simi Valley, California. Her husband grew up nearby and used to sneak on to the ranch to watch them shoot. They met under the tree in the “Ingalls” front yard where they were married.

pic.twitter.com/pcDHqLYKmZ

What’s There To See?

Alison Arngrim, who appeared on the show as Nellie Oleson and is very generous Twittering with fans @Arngrim, shared a 2 part home movie of a visit to Simi Valley, California where much of the TV show was filmed. Arngrim, who appeared as Nellie Oleson, has generously been working with the Walnut Grove Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Walnut Grove to provide fans a way to get signed copies of her books through the museum’s mail order system and provides this as another thank you to fans.

Back to Walnut Grove Part 1

Back to Walnut Grove Part 2

While many of the buildings were destroyed in filming the final episode (deliberately so), a few such as the church, were spared and could be seen for years, however a California wild fire took out most of these remaining structures. This video does a good job of helping you understand where the structures used to be so you can compare what you see in the episodes to what is on the ground today.

Eric Carson shared this information as a comment on the original post:
“About the church, you are “partially” right ;-) . The church from the show was not destroyed in the last episode, as you know, but it was dismantled, as the little house was. But some time later the owner of the ranch decided to have another small white church built on the land, and it was built at the blind school location, near the pond. That’s the church which was burnt by the 2004 fires, along with the replicas of the Ingalls house and barn.”

One of the questions we often get is “how can I visit the movie ranch where the Little House on the Prairie NBC series was filmed?” We’ve gotten it enough that I pursued it to get the full scoop. As a proviso, this is second hand information. I haven’t been there and frankly if I was taking a Laura trip to California it would be to Pomona and then San Francisco before I even thought about going to see Simi Valley, but since there seems to be interest from other people, I checked things out and this is what I found.

There used to be many movie ranches around Hollywood where rural scenes were filmed. Now Big Sky  (located in Simi Valley, California where the regular exteriors of the TV show were filmed) is about the last one left. It rents out land to movie and TV production companies to use in filming. Sometimes it’s to recreate the Old West, sometimes it’s just a modern ranch, and sometimes it’s just a good place to have a car chase away from people and sometimes it’s something else entirely. When a TV show rents ground for this it’s usually with the agreement they can build semi-permanent sets for the duration that they rent the land. These are NOT finished houses. They aren’t built to last, just to look good so they are mainly exterior walls, unfinished on the inside, and dressed to look like somebody really uses them with props. So it isn’t like these were finished houses that you saw during the LHoP episodes. Interior and some exterior sequences were shot in studios. Some specialty bits were shot elsewhere (for example much of the episode where Albert dreams they are in a classic western was shot at Old Tuscon and the Ernest Borgnine is an angel episode was shot at Donnell’s Vista), but the main farm and town exterior sequences and some of the extra exterior stuff was shot here. The production company built these shells of houses. Landon didn’t want anyone else using his creation and intended to destroy them before he left anyway so he wrote blowing up the town into the finale. So most of the sets were destroyed then. Since then wildfires have swept through the area and destroyed much of what was left. So now really it’s mostly just the bare land. Also other productions have probably used part of the land in the meantime further disrupting things. Little House in Simi Valley Part 1 includes a video that gives a good notion of what there is to see.

NOT a Tourist Attraction

Now remember that the ranch is a business, but one that makes its money renting out to film companies, NOT one that makes money through tourists. That means there is NO access at all if it’s rented out for filming on any particular day. HOWEVER, they will sometimes let you visit if you contact them ahead of time and ask and they have a day where they don’t have it rented. That set up also means that there are literally NO amenities. If they provided stuff on the land that would just mean things that the film crews would be inconvenienced to  shoot around it and extra expense for the owners. That means no picnic tables, no bathrooms, no food stands, no level walkways, and no nearby medical help.

Can I Go?

It’s really up to the owners who they let in. They are under no obligation to let you in and you are under an obligation to respect private property. They really are doing you a favor if they do let you in and they reasonably expect to be paid to help cover extra staff time to be there and let you in. Since this really isn’t a regular thing they do, there don’t seem to be any set rates, you’ll have to negotiate with them. I would recommend getting all that settled before you make a trip and remember they are doing you a FAVOR and act according.

Advice

If you do get permission to go in, be prepared to be self-sufficient. Take along water, wear heavy, long pants (work pants or jeans) and hiking boots are a good idea. Be careful where you step the ground is uneven and I’ve been told by multiple people that there are rattlesnakes there.

Eric Caron added on the original post: “I made the 2 videos you posted earlier and I had the chance to visit Big Sky twice. I would add to your post that, if the owners of the ranch let any visitor in, they will take them along the path and stay with them for the time of their stay. They will take them to the Plum Creek site and Walnut Grove site, but they won’t let them alone and free to wander around. I had the chance to visit with “Nellie” and “baby Carrie”, so the guy for the ranch just said to them ” I believe you know this place better than me” and he left us alone.
The place itself is gorgeous, rolling hills with beautiful trees… It is true that nothing is left, but if like me you studied carefully each shot from each episode to know where was what (yes I am that kind of crazy guy lol!!), it will be as if everything is still in place, because the hills, the hollows and most of the trees are still there.”

Lynne commented on the original post:
” I want to recommend Railtown 1897 State Historic Park in Jamestown, CA. This is where they shot the majority of the train scenes for the show. The depot area has not changed very much and you can actually take a tour and ride the trains. You can also see the caboose from The Runaway Caboose episode. Just 15 min. away is Columbia where some shots for Sleepy Eye were filmed and another 45 min and you will be at Donnell’s Vista.”

Still interested?

Then contact the Big Sky Movie Ranch.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Endorsements Page Unveiled

September 23, 2014

Ready to Present Today’s post is to let everyone know that I’m rolling out my endorsement page today. If you want to add a comment to the page, contact me at info@trundlebedtales.com

In my efforts to reorganize my blog, I decided a page dedicated to endorsements would be in order. If you’d like to add yours or make a comment, please contact me at info@trundlebedtales.com

Please remember Sarah Uthoff!  She is also a Humanities Iowa speaker.  Sarah is an expert on Laura Ingalls Wilder and has a variety of programs related to Laura.  Sarah also has an excellent program on One Room Schoolhouses. She also has other programs, but I am just speaking about the programs she has done for me.

Sarah is an excellent speaker and extremely knowledgeable.  I’ve been having  her present programs at the North Liberty Comm. Library for years, and I  learn something every time she presents.  Sarah is engaging and lots of fun  and her programs attract attendees from children through senior citizens.  I  really can’t recommend her enough!

Here is her website: http://www.trundlebedtales.com

~Elaine Hayes, MA, MLIS
Adult Services Librarian
North Liberty Community Library
North Liberty, Iowa

“William Anderson is a noted Wilder expert; but Iowa has its own expert in Sarah S. Uthoff who frequently writes about Wilder on her Trundlebed Tales site.”

In addition to Sarah’s active online presence, Sarah has a full repertoire of speaking programs that she is able to give to audiences of all age groups.  Sarah Uthoff is one of the finest contemporary experts on the life and times of Laura Ingalls Wilder actively writing and presenting today.  She has a portfolio of possible programs that she is able to draw from – giving groups and organizations just the focus needed.  Her programs extend from general background information to, my favorite, an “interactive visit with Laura using some of Laura’s own words.”  Laura often comes dressed in the era about which she is speaking.  Those in the audience might even think she has gone beyond channeling Laura’s words and has actually become Laura.  Sarah is a most interesting speaker and brings much to those who have an interest in learning more about the prairie life in the late 1800s.  Her programs are of interest to adults and fascinating to younger readers. If you have a chance to hear her speak or to invite her to your conference/library—don’t miss the opportunity.

~Sharron McElmeel
Director of McBookwords
Cedar Rapids, Iowa

“I’ve only had good comments about your program. Several people who didn’t make it asked if we could do it again so they could come. I said perhaps sometime down the road. I’ve had a packed house for kids’ programs, but not that many adults before. I hope your drive home was pleasant and you made it home in time to get the chores done.”

~Gayle Ausley
Children’s Librarian
Corning Public Library
Corning, Iowa

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Missing Murals of Iowa City

September 21, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I haven’t updated this post, but it coming up next on my reblog list reminds me I still have to get a photo of the new mural downtown and make a post of it. So look for it.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

When I was growing up there were three  major murals in Iowa City that I loved to look at.  The one I loved the best was in the children’s story time room at the Iowa City Public Library. The room was windowless in the addition to the original Carnegie of the ICPL. It was painted with children playing and anything that could be up in the air, kites, trees, birds, and ribbons. I really loved the mural and was truly sorry to lose it when the library moved into its new home (same location, but different building that it occupies now).

The second was downtown and had an optic effect where it when back and forth between a pattern of Native Americans and Eagles called the Black Hawk Mural that still has given its name to a small park next door. It was stripped off when the building was gentrified…

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