Happy Fourth of July

July 4, 2014

July 4th Trundlebed Tales I’ve actually been working on a Fourth of July post for awhile because the National Archives has put up a lot of video about their celebrations the last two years on their YouTube Channel and I’ve slowly getting them watched and organized, but since I didn’t get finished, instead watch this fascinating video about the recasing and care of the Declaration of Independence and a mystery handprint [my guess is it's from the guys in National Treasure :) ]

Declaration of Independence:

There has been a movement lately to get people to read the Declarataion of Independence on Independence Day which I think is well worth doing, know your rights. Find the text, high quality photos of the original, and more at the National Archives.
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration.html

Click on “Read Transcript” to get to the words in typeface.

Also, remember this year is the 200th anniversary of Star Spangled Banner flag.

- WATCH: July 4th at 8:30p ET on C-SPAN3: Star-Spangled Banner 200th Anniversary
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History event includes musical performances and ends with a simultaneous nationwide singing of the national anthem.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Mentions June 2014

July 3, 2014

Our mentions posts are round ups of articles and mentions of Sarah Uthoff or Trundlebed Tales in the media from the previous month, plus sometimes some bonuses that I’ve just come across from earlier months.

Answer questions for  free access to an article that mentions my program in the Newton Daily News.
http://www.newtondailynews.com/2014/06/01/library-launching-summer-youth-reading-programs-tuesday/aazy6jv/?page=2

See a photo of me presenting at The Country School Association conference 50 seconds into this video:

Republished with permission from the Johnson County Historical Society Newsletter:

jchs may 2014

jchs may 2014

 

And this is actually from last fall, but I just saw it now:
http://librarianjournal.blogspot.com/2013/09/arsl-2013-conference-day-3.html

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

July 2014 Laura Ingalls Wilder Events

July 2, 2014

During July check out these Laura Ingalls Wilder related events around the country. July seems to be a big time for Laura events so if I’ve missed one please let me know.

I’m still playing with the formatting of these posts. Do you like this look better? Would a list by calendar date be more helpful than by place? Please comment in how I can make these more useful to you.

Audience Volunteers Participate in Pageant

Audience Volunteers Participate in Pageant

  • Walnut Grove MN

    Fragments of a Dream Pageant July 11-12, 18-19, 25-26, 2014

    Cast Reunion July 25, 26, 27, 2014 – 40th Anniversary of “Little House on the Prairie TV Show” Many cast members coming. – Don’t expect to just show up that weekend. Make plans now.

  • De Smet SD

    These Happy Golden Years Pageant – July 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 15, 26, 27, 2014

  • Mansfield MO

    Laura’s Memories Pageant – July 5, 11-12, 18-19, 2014
    *More dates in August and September

  • Malone/Burke NY

    Children’s Art & Morgan Horse Event – July 26, 2014

  • Independence KS

    One Room Schoolhouse Days with Kay Little – July 12, 2014
    Join Kay Little from Little History Adventures as she provides one room schoolhouse lessons in the Sunnyside Schoolhouse from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm.

    Meet Laura Ingalls Wilder (1894) – July 26, 2014
    Meet Laura Ingalls Wilder in 1894 as she is moving from DeSmet, South Dakota to Mansfield, Missouri.  Laura will visit our Sunnyside Schoolhouse at 12:00 pm and again at 3:00 pm and share her story.

  • Old World Wisconsin – Eagle WI

    World of Little House – June 28, 2014 – July 31, 2014

  • Heritage Hill – Green Bay WI

    Laura Ingalls Wilder Days with guests Alison Arngrim and Dean Butler – July 12th and 13th, 2014 (Corrected Date)
    Laura Historian Bill Anderson will be speaking.

  • Vinton IA

    First Annual Mary Ingalls Society Pageant August 1-2, 2014 *This is next month, but so close to the beginning I wanted to make sure to make to point it out.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

In the Kitchen With Laura May 2014

June 30, 2014

This the fifth in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about In the Kitchen With Laura. I’m running late, but here is the entry for May.

One of the parts of cooking that has changed a lot from when Laura first learned to cook and even from the 1930s to today is the kind of shortening used.

Butter

Butter by the Stick

When Laura was growing up on a farm in the Midwest, butter was a seasonal food, something to be had when the cow was in milk if you were a farmer. But even then the family didn’t get a lot of it usually because butter and eggs that the farm wife produced not only fed the family but were often a regular cash crop that was often one of the main sources of cash flow between harvests. (Not that farm wives got a lot of credit for this.) The first creameries that commercially produced butter appeared in New York state in the late 1850s and early 1860s. But slowly the process commercialized. Factory production of butter raised from 29 million pounds nation wide in 1879 to over 1 billion pounds in 1921. New York became the largest butter producer state in the country during the early 19th century and easily remained so until finally surpassed by Wisconsin in the first quarter of the 20th century. In the 1930s Laura was probably still using home produced butter, but the familiar waxed paper wrapped four quarter sticks in a cardboard box had been introduced in urban markets during the 1920s. Previously factory produced butter was packed in a wooden tub, wrapped in linen, and during sometimes sealed in a can.

Today the use of butter is coming back:
http://online.wsj.com/articles/butter-makes-comeback-as-margarine-loses-favor-1403745263?mod=e2tw

Lard (rendered from the pork fat) used to be a much bigger part of the American diet. It was not only used for cooking, as a shortening in baked goods (in which it produces a unique

Lard in a Tub

Lard in a Tub

and wonderful texture – for all crusts and breads, not cookies which are kind of awful with lard), but also a medium for frying. This was supplemented to some extent by fat cooked off meat like bacon fat. Lard was even used as a spread on sandwiches (which from most reports a lot of people liked) and a dressing on salads. In a pre-constant refrigeration world it was a dependable and long keeping source of fat.  Lard fell further out of favor as American work lives got more sedentary and less in need of calories and health concerns were raised, even though there are just as big health concerns now raised about the substitutes. Maybe lard wasn’t so bad after all.

Butter and Margarine

Butter and Margarine

Margarine (also known as oleo), a vegetable fat substitute, was first developed in 1869, but it didn’t actually enter the American market place in even a limited way until 1873. Its success though was enough that laws were passed in some states as early as 1877 to protect dairy interests which limited its spread. Both to protect the dairy industry and out of fear of the dyes used, legislation had passed in 32 states by 1902 and national laws eventually followed suit, so that margarine had to be sold without color, instead of looking almost like butter as it does today. By the 1930s, margarine came as an unappealing gelatinous grayish white mass that came with a packet of color that had to be stirred in for it to look butter like. It was only when war arms production and army food demands took most of the supply of animal fats that the vegetable ones started to gain the hold on the market that they have today. This stepped up again as health concerns were stirred up against butter in the 1960s which again increased margarine production. Back in the 19th century margarine was made from hydrogenated animal fats, but around 1900 it became possible to produce it from vegetable oil, such as peanut or cottonseed oil by hydrogenating it. According to Michael Krondl “In 1930 per capita consumption of margarine was only 2.6 pounds while butter was 17.6 pounds.” Krondl says it would quadruple by the end of the 20th century and butter use dropped considerably.

Corn Oil

Corn Oil

It was even later that liquid shortening became popular. Olive oil was regularly available starting in colonial times, but it was used only in settlements of certain immigrants who had a tradition of cooking in it. Most of the country used it almost exclusively for salad dressing. It really didn’t become popular for use in cooking until after 1980. Corn oil was first marketed starting in 1910, but it didn’t really take off until the rationing during World War II. Soybean oil (especially in industrial purposes and as an ingredient people don’t realize is there) also benefited from the rationing creating a market for soybeans that quickly went from an object of curiosity and an interesting garden pod plant to one of the biggest cash crops in America.

Canola Oil

Canola Oil

Canola Oil (a more market friendly name for rapeseed oil) didn’t take off in the United States until the FDA let them change the name in 1988.

Like butter, lard had its own vegetable based competitor in vegetable shortening, with Crisco being the best known brand. Today you can still get lard in many grocery stories, clean, white, pressed square and in neat packets, or as a real cook you can venture into a butcher shop or a meat locker business and buy it by the impressive tub (we normally do the later).

For your project of the month, get some lard and try to cook something with it, biscuits will do or a simple pie crust and taste the difference that lard can bring to your cooking for yourself.

Lard in Store

Lard in Store

The description of shortening use is focused on the United States. Other parts of the world had different experiences.

Some of the information in this piece, including all the quotes and the hard numbers, is from the two volume The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

What’s YOUR Laura story?

June 28, 2014

trundlebedtales:

This was originally for the Laura Ingalls Wilder birthday party in 2013. In my last update I added links to this and other episodes and I don’t think I have anything else to add. People really enjoy it, so take a listen if you haven’t and be sure to check out the original post for the comments.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Hay Twist Station at Adult Laura Day

Hay Twist Station at Adult Laura Day

This year I will once again be hosting an episode of the podcast as an
On Air Birthday Party for Laura Ingalls Wilder, on Thurs., February 7, 2013. What I would like to include this year is people’s stories either about their favorite Laura related story (maybe they made molasses on snow candy, maybe you won a Little Miss Laura contest, attended a special Laura event, figured out how to make a haytwist, or sewed a quilt with your grandmother) or just the story of how you became a Laura fan in the first place. You can call into the show live or if you rather you can write it up and leave it as a comment here, send it through e-mail info@trundlebedtales.com, message or post it on Facebook or LinkedIn or Twitter. Please go ahead and share now, it will be Laura’s…

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Karpeles Museum

June 26, 2014

Manuscript Museum 1Recently I got to be an extra in a shoot for the film Sons and Daughters of Thunder about early abolitionists. That brought me to the facility where they were shooting which is a pretty amazing place in its own right. As I’m always looking for amazing places to share, I thought you’d want to know about this one too. (You can see me in the blue dress with the tan shawl up against the white railing near the back.)
http://www.qconline.com/archives/qco/display.php?id=678732

Karpeles Museums Around the Country

I had never heard of the Karpeles before this, but apparently he made his fortune in a combination of real estate and Manscript Interiorbusiness dealings. He is a famous mathematician, having invented according to the website: “While at General Electric, David created the first operating optical character recognition program. This program automatically read the handwritten figure amounts on bank-checks and printed that amount magnetically on the margin of the check. Developed an artificial intelligence program allowing personnel to question a computer using unrestricted English language. The program analyzed the syntax of the question, determined the meaning and gave the appropriate answer.” Meanwhile his wife, Marsha, who he married in 1958, held many socially prominent and philanthropic positions. Today she serves as President of Karpeles Manuscript Library and Museums.

The couple started collecting documents in 1979 and the collection is amazing including some pieces that I was shocked ended up in private hands at all. Again according to their website: “The Karpeles Manuscript Library preserves the largest private collection of original Manuscripts in the world. The museum was founded in 1983 by David Karpeles and Marsha Karpeles who created the museum to stimulate interest in learning, especially in our children. All of the Karpeles Manuscript Library services are free.”

Their is also a portion of their collection digitized and available on their website:
http://www.rain.org/~karpeles

Karpeles in Rock Island

Dixie Manuscript DisplayThe museum I was at is located in Rock Island, Illinois. It’s a smaller urban area than houses most of their sites. It’s located in a former Christian Science Church that is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. “It was designed by architect William C. Jones of Chicago in the Palladian style, it was built between 1914-1915. Its exterior walls are of brick covered by Bedford limestone. Its superimposed front portico is supported by six 2 story columns with egg-and-dart capitals. Its dome actually consists of 2 domes: an outer dome and an inner dome which are separated by a space for lighting fixtures and maintenance. The inner dome consists of some 8,000 colored fish scale glass panes on a wooden support structure. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 14, 1998. 
”

I tried to find the National Register of Historic Places file on the building to link to, but I couldn’t find one for the building. I think it was probably included as part of the Broadway Historic District rather than as an individual property, but that particular file has yet to be digitized so I’m not sure.

Find out more at their website:
http://www.rain.org/~karpeles/RIfrm.html

And On Their Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/KarpelesRockIsland

Read a local article about the museum:
http://www.bettendorf.com/node/1476

Collection Rotates

Each document I saw was permanently encased in Mylar and resting flat on a bed. There was no special lighting on the case and I’d be willing to bet the cases were UV protected. An informational sign was posted over each one. There were roughly 20 documents on display at any one time and only the documents on display were onsite. The collection rotates through the museums with this particular batch of documents being about or related to the Civil War. Among the documents on display was a handwritten copy of Dixie by its composer Daniel Decatur Emmett, Abraham Lincoln ordering a blockade on Virginia and North Carolina ports, and a description of life at Fort Sumter including a swatch from the Fort Sumter flag.

No matter what their current topic is I think it is worth your time to head over to Karpeles Museum in Rock Island, or one of the other sites if it’s closer to you and see what they have.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Let’s Get Organized

June 23, 2014

The social media head of the National Archives has led to them posting a lot of videos online. I watch as many as I get a chance to. Some of them are really fascinating. Some are kind of odd, but there’s something there for everybody. One of my favorite recent finds was this video which was really put up for internal use. It’s a presentation by a consultant on organizing your digital records which is something I think everybody can use. The presenter is Donna Read, CRM, CDIA+, Senior Records Analyst at National Archives & Records Administration. Learn more about her here:
http://www.donnaread.com/index.html

As a librarian, I think her suggestions and organizational schema is very impressive and one that everyone could adopt for their own business and personal life. I’m also really impressed that she acknowledges the important work done by secretaries in the pre-computer era. A lot of truly useful and valuable work done by women up to the 1980s was discounted mostly because it was done by women and wasn’t at all glamorous, but the numbers she cites on the amount worktime lost to misplaced files and the amount of money lost to unnecessary preservation of materials, it really makes me wonder if those computer working saving studies were really set up to take the full picture into account and if the loss of institutional knowledge really wasn’t more of a loss to society than we realize.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

One-Room School Lunch Baskets

June 21, 2014

trundlebedtales:

Tonight another one of my top posts and considering I was at a one-room school conference this week, the subject is fitting.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

One of my on-going projects is in researching the one-room school lunch. Read more about the project here:

Lunch Basket 1880s

Lunch Basket 1880s

As I’ve been going through materials and looking for examples and photos, one thing that had eluded me was a lunch basket. Although I saw several ads for these, I hadn’t run across any photos or drawings. I saw so many ads that I think there must be different styles, but I finally have found one positively identified school lunch basket. It was carried in town by Alice Salbkat in the 1880s. She left it with a collection of other materials to the Spring Valley (MN) Historical Society and it is currently on display in their recreated one-room school room. Thank you to Spring Valley for letting me photograph this basket and share my find.

UPDATE: There was a request to add measurements to this post in the comments, but…

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First National Park Nebraska’s Wilderness and Pioneer Courage Park

June 19, 2014
Geese Taking Flight

Geese Taking Flight

I was going to save this for one of my And One More On the Way Posts, but it was just such a happy surprise that I can’t wait any more to share it. This park in the heart of Omaha, NE needs to immediately be added to people’s Laura Ingalls Wilder Dream trip list. First, a word about the name, no, the first national park in US history was NOT in Omaha, Nebraska. First National is the name of a local bank (a very common name for a bank to choose in the days before national banking chains). Apparently the person in charge of doing this for the bank, while very brilliant to either come up with or at least agree to fund this project, has a bit of a tin ear and didn’t see that considering a “national park” is a specific kind of a park, that calling something “First National Park” might cause confusion. Second, also confusing is that they built Omaha’s tallest building (which houses the bank) right in the center of it, additional bank owned buildings are around the campus centered on the park. So third, while apparently it is designed to be a public park, it is also a campus for their facility.

As further background I want to make sure to point out that what is now the Hilton Double Tree that I mention below was once the site of the famous trial of Standing Bear. He’s the one that in his native tongue originally gave the speech, now widely copied in popular culture, that went: “My hand is not the same color as yours. If I pierce it, I shall feel pain. If you pierce your hand, you too will feel pain. The blood that flows will be the same color. I am a man. The same God made us both.”
Learn more about Standing Bear and his trial here:
http://www.pbs.org/program/standing-bears-footsteps

American Buffalo

American Buffalo

Now to the statues, they are a very easy thing to miss. I’d done the normal touristy checking before my trip to Omaha for the Association of Rural and Small Libraries last fall, but I only found this park because I pretty much literally tripped over it. No one gave me a heads up and I don’t remember a fellow Laura fan ever telling me to look out for it if I was in Omaha. The conference hotel was the Doubletree Hilton in Omaha, Nebraska (which I liked except for the horrible parking, but I’ve dealt with worse) and coming up into the very building of the hotel was part of the artwork that makes up the Nebraska’s Wilderness part of the art work in the form of statues of geese that seemed to be flying away from the American buffalo that seeming scared them from their place on the fountain in the park across the way.

I love interactive artwork like that and so I followed the geese back across to the park (spread over the entire space there are 58 geese statues over all), I enjoyed taking photos of the truly lovely statues of the animals as the light shifted in the late afternoon and then noticed the bison led me back around a corner. I followed, there was one partially coming thru a building, like they were ghost bison from before these buildings were here and didn’t pay it any mind. How could you resist that? So I kept following them backward. There were even some cute little calves. There are 9 animals in the herd I tracked back along the block. Then I turned again and almost dropped by camera. An entire city block had been refashioned into a park with a full wagon train complete with scout. A gentle hill had been refashioned into cliffs, wagons struggled through sculpted mud as they fought their way to the top. Women and children walked beside the heavily loaded, and richly detailed wagons.  The wagon train had scared the bison causing them to run and send the ducks flying. It was all one giant piece of art and you were suddenly in the middle of it.

Wagon 3

Wagon 3

Together, Pioneer Courage and Spirit of Nebraska’s Wilderness parks consist of more than 100 individual bronze pieces integrated within an urban environment that covers more than six city blocks. Individual sculpture pieces are 1.25 times life size and range in weight from 400 pounds to six tons.

The bison, I’m not so sure were really 1.25 times their normal size, I’ve seen real bison that looked larger than these and the geese I’m iffy about, but the people and horses definitely were 1.25 life size and it allowed you a wonderful glimpse of a wagon train (I’d have stuck to life size if it was me, but close enough.) In other words, except for being very hard to get a photo of without modern buildings behind it, which was probably part of the point of the meaning behind it, it is a perfect place to take a photo of yourself in full Laura Ingalls Wilder garb as part of a wagon train. There are four complete wagons as part of the train and more groups of people spread out along the manufactured dry “river bed” and trees on the hill. The scout’s hunt has been successful and he’s bringing back fresh meat for the train (feel free to flash back to Oregon Trail).

The official brochure (see link below) describes the wagon train this way:

The lead wagon, pulled by oxen, has just been freed from the mud and, with some pushing and guidance from the drivers continues on. The following wagon is drawn by a team of mules driving by the father, two children ride which the mother and daughter walk alongside. Four Belgian draft horses pull the next conveyance, which is accompanied by three women, a father, several children, and a milk cow. Farther back the procession is completed with another ox-drawn wagon and its family. The mounted wagon master falls behind, branding his hat to guide the rest of the train.

Wagon in the Mud

Wagon in the Mud

It’s the second wagon that I was immediately drawn to as a Laura fan. It could clearly be Ma and Laura and these two free standing statues are organized in such a way that you can walk into step with them and become part of the statue yourself. Other people might prefer the last wagon and the running girl with her hair streaming or even the boy on lounging on the second wagon for all the world like Almanzo riding a load in from the hayfield. Or maybe you’ll prefer the all female group, taking a short cut over the hill and under the shade of the trees. Look at all of them.

NOTE: This is probably unnecessary to stress for Laura fans, but just in case, they encourage you to experience becoming park of the wagon train and walking along with them, gentle touching shouldn’t be an issue, but they are NOT meant to be climbed on.

Wagon 2

Wagon 2 with Almanzo perched on Top

Visit their official website:
https://www.firstnational.com/site/about-us/in-the-community/sculpture-parks.fhtml

Find the brochure for the site as a whole here:
https://www.firstnational.com/assets/site/documents/about-us/communityfocus_parks.pdf

While I’m sorry I missed knowing about it before, I haven’t missed it all that long. The giant artwork designed to give a truly unique vision and experience to downtown Omaha was first conceived in the early 2000s. Statues were installed between 2005 and 2009 slowly forming the current complex.

Read details about the artists, dimensions, and composition of the artwork of Nebraska Wilderness here:
https://www.firstnational.com/assets/site/documents/about-us/son_facts.pdf

Read details about the artists, dimensions, and composition of the artwork of Pioneer Courage here:
https://www.firstnational.com/assets/site/documents/about-us/pioneer_facts.pdf

Learn more on the making of documentary’s website:
http://omahasculptures.com/index.html

Find more professional photos at the bottom of this page (and look for the link to take you to construction photos):
http://www.boodyfinearts.com/projects/firstnational.html

Laura and Me

Join in with the train for photos

An article about the history of the project and the design of the site as a whole:
http://www.landscapeonline.com/research/article/16263

If you go, they have an app to tell you about it and other public art around Omaha on your smart phone:
http://www.exploreomahaobd.com/locations/four

P.S. The real first, as in original, National Park was Yellowstone and it was signed into law by President U.S. Grant in 1872.
http://www.nps.gov/faqs.htm

P.P.S. If you are in Omaha anyway to see the statue be sure to stop at the incredible Durham Museum preserving one of the last great union stations built in a uniquely art deco style.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 3

June 16, 2014
GSP Book Shelf

GSP Book Shelf

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share March’s posted video. As I pointed out in Part 2, Doug Stratton didn’t have any family memories to pass along, but Monica Meehan Berg is a direct descendent and while she has no personal memories of Gene (her great-grandmother), she does have strong memories of Jeanette Porter (Gene’s daughter) who did a good job of carrying on her mother’s legacy.  If you followed me on Facebook last year you know the Anniversary Dinner in Gene Stratton-Porter’s honor in August was one of the things I’d really hoped to get to last summer and I didn’t, but this happily was filmed there.

Video 3 is called “March 2014: A Chat with Monica Meehan Berg.” It was published on YouTube on March 10, 2014.

They say about it: “In the March Episode of the Stratton Foundation’s GS-P series, we meet Monica Meehan Berg at the 150th Birthday Celebration Gene Stratton-Porter Gala (held in August of 2013). Monica is Jeannette Porter Meehan’s granddaughter; making her Gene’s great-granddaughter. Although, Monica never met Gene personally, Jeannette has passed on the heritage and anecdotes of Gene Stratton-Porter through the generations and this episode is a glimpse of that. This episode has also been dedicated to Monica’s father, James Leo Meehan.”

I’m very glad that they featured someone who has those family stories to pass down. I think you’ll enjoy it.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 


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