November 2014 Presentations

November 3, 2014

The Turkey and Me My series of 3 monthly posts (presentation schedule, Laura events and mentions) are a bit delayed this month owing to how the beginning for the month fell. I hope you enjoy them anyway.

Bookings for programs are still trickling in. I have to update the overall list for at least one booking in December and another in April. I’m also sorry that the way things worked out, I had to turn down a booking for this month with my schedule, but I hope we can get things worked out for spring. Looking ahead to Thanksgiving!

  • Estherville Public Library – Estherville, Iowa – General Laura Program – November 8, 2014 – 10:30 am
  • Jesup Public Library – Jesup, Iowa – Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:30 pm

That’s it for this month and this time it is too late, but please consider me for bookings in 2015. If you’d like me to come present near you make sure to tell your local library, museum or civic group. I’m really excited about my Thanksgiving programs. If you are looking for a Thanksgiving program, check them out.  Learn more about the other programs I offer here:
http://www.trundlebedtales.com/programs.html

And check out my brochure:
Brochure2014pg1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

Blind School in Vinton July 2012

November 1, 2014

trundlebedtales:

Update: Another of my post updates. They have successfully put on a pageant and they used basically nothing of this original production. The building access was restricted most of this year, but the roof repair has been completed and they are working on the interior restoration. It should come out better than it was before. I also mentioned meeting Robert Spangler and he has since come on my podast. http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/vinton-and-the-mary-ingalls-society

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

I have always wished that I could have been at one of the early presentations of any of the Laura Ingalls Wilder pageants to see them when they

School for the Blind (Rear View)

were first starting out and now I think I just might have gotten my wish.

This last visit (July 27, 28, and 29, 2012) was the 160th reunion for students from the Iowa School for the Blind and Sight Saving School. Events were scheduled all weekend and students as from as far back as the class of 1938 attended.

http://www.vintoniowa.org/articles/News/article10893.html

That was a perfect springboard for a play written as an interview with Mary Ingalls (as portrayed by April Seitz). There were a couple of “facts” I’d like to correct for them and if they keep this format they have to decide what exactly is going on (If Mary is in the present as she

Mary…

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Gone With the Wind Behind the Scenes

October 30, 2014

You might have noticed by now that while I’m usually interested in just about anything historical, I’m especially interested in things with Iowa historical connections and I recently came across one.

Gone With the Wind Fandom

I’m not a huge Gone With the Wind fan, it may be because we had to watch and be silent when we watched it with my mom once a year every year (they used to play it as a two night extravaganza mini-series on broadcast TV every single year when I was growing up in the pre-DVD, pre-VHS era). It may be that even from an early age that I rebelled against the insidious myth of the lost cause, but I can’t say I’m a fan of the movie. I do have a sort of fondness for it. I have some fan-like reactions. It’s not that I didn’t like Scarlet and Rhett or before this was even a fan term “ship” them enough to write a short sequel while in high school where they get back together [having heard the highlights of Scarlett from my mom I think family would have been better off making mine the official sequel ;-) ] and having heard about THE DUMP apartment in Atlanta I now really want to see where Margaret Mitchell lived. I also went to see the movie in a real theater when it was in limited release so I could see it on the big screen as intended for once (they really do have an intermission so people don’t have to miss any of it), but I’m not that big a fan. My mom not only loved to watch the movie, she also read the book and when Scarlett came out shut herself in her room with the door closed for two days straight to read it (and she NEVER did that). SHE is a big fan of GWTW, but I at least have enough interest so when a link for “20 Things You Might Not Have Known About Gone With The Wind” popped up in my Facebook feed I clicked on it and I’m glad I did.

Iowa Connection to GWTW Movie

It turns out there is an Iowa connection to the movie (and I don’t mean that libelous and inaccurate description of the Prisoner of War facility at Rock Island, Illinois that appears in the book). Howard Hall was the patriarch of the last of the three families to live in the historic Brucemore Mansion in Cedar Rapids, Iowa (FYI the second family had a brother who went down on the RMS Titanic). If you tour Brucemore and its grounds today Hall is the one that built the secret Tiki Bar in the basement (it fake rains just like the one at Disneyland), but they only sometimes let you get into it now. Hall was fascinated by movies. He even had a series of pet lions, one of which was related to the roaring lion of MGM films. Hall also took home movies and having gotten behind the scenes filming of Gone With the Wind, he filmed that. The house and contents was left to the National Historic Trust in 1981 at his wife’s death and they only got around to working through the film collection in the 2000s.

Filming Behind the Scenes

Watch the Clip as part of the news story below:
http://mentalfloss.com/article/56085/20-things-you-might-not-have-known-about-gone-wind

Or find it directly on YouTube here:

Mental Floss says this about the clip:
“Howard Hall was an Iowan business magnate and film enthusiast. At some point during the filming of the barbeque scene, Hall was allowed access to the set. There, he filmed the famous cast and crowds of extras lolling around Busch Gardens, where the scene was filmed. The film lay inside Hall’s Brucemore Mansion until the 2000s, when it was discovered amid other home movies when the estate was turned over to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.”

How Can You See More?

I contacted Brucemore for a follow up since this clip in 2008 and they said sadly they weren’t able yet to get it in a format for sale like they hoped and was discussed in the clip, but they did have it available to view in its entirety at Brucemore.

Learn more about Brucemore here (they also have a building that was once a combination book bindery and squash court, how can you NOT want to see that?):
http://www.brucemore.org

And check out other Gone With the Wind locations here:
http://www.movie-locations.com/movies/g/gwtw.html#.VFGAYhBzPT0

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

What is the Country School Association?

October 28, 2014

The Country School Association of America is the national association for one-room schools. It’s an interesting organization because it started having almost spontaneous conferences around the country until they formalized it with an organization. The CSAA brings together Museum volunteers, teachers, staff, faculty and students, preservationists, historians, re-enactors and interested 26872059citizen, to exchange ideas and resources. The organization holds an annual conference, provides a grant program, awards publication and video prizes, conducts surveys and publishes an electronic newsletter, all in support of the country schooling experience.

The CSAA is look for people who wish to preserve schools, create or maintain museums, promote living history programs, and allow children of all ages to experience schooling as it was many years ago. It allows seniors a chance to relive their fondest schoolhouse memories, while offering educators and writers a forum to share research. Additionally, this organization encourages research on country schooling and provides a forum for those who wish to publish their articles. The annual CSAA conference grows larger as a forum for exchanging ideas among academics, preservationists, re-enactors, and just plain history buffs. The conference site moves around every year. They try to do a Midwest location one-year (where the majority of members live) and a different part of the country the next. This year they will be in New York about an hour and a half from Malone (see below).

Currently I serve on the board. It’s a quality organization and I think the conference this year was one of the best ones ever. If you want to learn more about it, check out the information below. (Note: Some of the above text was borrowed from the CSAA homepage.)

 

Around the web:

Awards & Grants

Please be advised that all award submission material becomes the property of the Country School Association of America (CSAA) and will be retained in the CSAA archives.

CSAA Award for Scholarship and Artistry (Guidelines)

Agriculture Museum in Brookings, SD

Agriculture Museum in Brookings, SD

CSAA Preservation Grant (Guidelines)

CSAA Preservation Grant (Application)

CSAA National Schoolhouse Registry (Guidelines)

CSAA National Schoolhouse Registry (Application)

CSAA Service Award (Guidelines and Application)

CSAA Disaster Relief Fund (Guidelines and Application)

CSAA Annual Conference Financial Aid (Guidelines)

 

 

15th Annual CSAA Conference:

June 14-17, 2015

Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York

Brochure (Page1)

Brochure (Page 2)

 The CSAA Annual Conference draws a diverse group of participants from many different organizations, museums, academic institutions as well as cultural and heritage centers. Each year, the CSAA Annual Conference provide museum personnel, teachers, staff, faculty and students, preservationists, historians and re-enactors from across the country, with an intimate forum to exchange ideas, discuss their current activities, programs and issues with colleagues in the field. With such an energetic atmosphere, wide choice of activities, dynamic events, educational sessions and networking opportunities, you do not want to miss this.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Peppy – the Lake Pepin Monster

October 26, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I had done an update on this last year so be sure to follow the link to find out more, but I always get lots of hits for Peppy or Pepie.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Lake Pepin from boat

Lake Pepin from boat

You’ve heard of Nessie from Loch Ness and Champie from Lake Champlain, but have you heard of Peppy, the Lake Pepin monster? Yes, that’s right Peppy was first spotted in 1871. In 2008, an award was posted if anyone came forward with proof and the name Pepie was copyrighted. Although no proof was forthcoming (at least so far, right cryptozoologists?), the website behind it is still up.

http://www.pepie.net

An article from 2008 describes the idea behind the award and gives some modern accounts of 20th century sightings.

http://www.hotspotoutdoors.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/1429774/Re_Monster_in_Lake_Pepin

How about it Laura fans? Have you seen anything strange out on the lake?

Check out this updated post:
http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2013/03/17/peppy-the-lake-pepin-monster-2

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend

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National Information Literacy Awareness Month

October 24, 2014

Information Literacy Supporter BadgeEach October our thoughts turn to National Information Literacy Awareness Month. Information Literacy. Information Literacy means making sure people can find, evaluate information for quality, and use the information that they need. Information Literacy is a big part of any library program. It’s no longer enough to be literate, as in being able to read, but you must be literate in figuring out where you can get the information you need and separating the wheat from the chaff to make sure what you’ve found is good. The abundance of information available online makes these lessons even more important and libraries more vital to society, not less. Last year I ran a confessions photo contest, but it didn’t get much response so this year Kirkwood Community College is doing a series of blog posts to try and make you more aware of Information Literacy.

Read a brief history and what is going on nationally here:
http://infolit.org/national-information-literacy-awareness-month-is-october/

You can also find the badge, like the one above, please share it on your various social media sites to help make people aware of the importance of good information:
http://www.librariesthriving.org/partnerships/2014-information-literacy-campaign
(Make sure you select your state before copying, it shows up on the badge.)

Find last year’s posts and Iowa’s proclamation on National Information Literacy Awareness Month here:
https://kirkwoodlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/10/04/information-literacy-awareness-month-comes-to-iowa/

And my best post so far this month about passwords:
http://kirkwoodlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/10/16/information-literacy-passwords

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Gene Stratton-Porter Video Part 7

October 22, 2014
StrattonPorter Paperwork

Stratton-Porter Paperwork

Back in January I had posted about a series of videos that the Stratton Foundation was going to be posting (1 a month) about Gene Stratton-Porter and her homesites in Indiana. At that time I explained more in depth about who Gene Stratton-Porter was, but I haven’t done a good job following up with posts about the following videos. Today I’m going to share July’s posted video. As I pointed out in Part 2, Doug Stratton didn’t have any family memories to pass along, but Monica Meehan Berg is a direct descendent and while she has no personal memories of Gene (her great-grandmother), she does have strong memories of Jeanette Porter (Gene’s daughter) who did a good job of carrying on her mother’s legacy.  If you followed me on Facebook last year you know the Anniversary Dinner in Gene Stratton-Porter’s honor in August was one of the things I’d really hoped to get to last summer and I didn’t, but this happily was filmed there.

Video 7 is called “July 2014: A Family Discussion with Doug, Dennis, & Monica.” It was published on YouTube on July 20, 2014. This video includes old family photos and artifacts.

They say about it: “Prior to the movie screening at the 150th Birthday Celebration Gene Stratton-Porter Gala, Doug, Dennis, and Monica share thoughts and stories with one another about Gene and her daughter Jeannette. They also discuss the inspiration Gene and her production company have had on The Stratton Foundation.”

I’m really very sorry I couldn’t attend this event. I think I would have really enjoyed it.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Thaumatropes

October 20, 2014

trundlebedtales:

I just checked and the links were still good. Really the only thing I have to add is that you can actually create your own Thaumatropes. All you have to do is come up with an image that can easily be divided into two and draw one half on each side of a stiff paper or cardboard disc.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

A few years ago at one -room school conference I was asked if I knew if anyone was making reproduction Thaumatropes. At that time I was unaware of any, but now I have found a source, so I’m sharing it.

Thaumatropes

Although  its producer, Historical Folk Toys, only sells directly in wholesale amounts, they have a series of old-fashioned games and toys. From their homepage you can find toys divided by time period.

http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catalog/toys5.html#2016

The Thaumatrope works on the same general principle as the buzz saw game people typically make with buttons, but with an added twist. The game uses the persistence of vision. On one side of the disk is half of an image, for example for the one pictured on the left, one side shows an empty cage. The other half is on the other side, in this example a parrot. When spun like a buzz saw the…

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Ep 60 Travel Tips for Laura Ingalls Wilder Vacations

October 16, 2014

The Laura Ingalls Wilder travel season is winding down and I’ve reached my 60th numbered Trundlebed Tales episode. In honor of this I’m going to finally do the special program that I’ve talked about doing in my Laura Ingalls Wilder monthly updates all summer. This is going to be a call in show where people can call in and share their favorite tip or discovery on any Laura related trip. This is taking a risk. I’ve reserved 60 minutes for the show and I don’t know if anybody will call in, but let’s try it and see what happens.

What Kind of Tips Am I Looking For?

I’m calling on fans and hope we get a lot of response. As people start planning their Laura Ingalls Wilder trips for next year we

Pepin Laura Days

Pepin Laura Days

want to give them the best advice and we’re counting on YOU! Call in and give your best Laura related travel tip. Which route do you take? What’s your favorite Laura trip related discovery? Is there a cool store everyone should visit? Where’s the best play to stay? Which homesites are best for adults only? Which homesites are best with kids? Single stop or big circle route? Should you do back to back pageants? Favorite non-related place to stop on way to homesite. Plus any related tip or hint you can think up.

When Is It?

Don’t worry, there’s plenty of time to think up your hint. The episode is scheduled for Thurs., October 30th, 2014 9 pm ET, 8 pm CT, 7 pm MT, 6 pm PT.

How Do I Participate?

Please call in at: Call in (714) 242-5253 or toll free 1-877-633-9389.  If you only call in once this year, this is the episode to do it. I’d prefer if you’d call in because it makes a more interesting show, but if you can’t call you can ask your questions in the chatroom while you live stream the episodes or you can tweet me @trundlebedtales or you can message Trundlebed Tales on Facebook or you can e-mail me at info@trundlebedtales.com. Just be sure to get that tip in.

You can also listen by streaming live or later:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/trundlebedtales/2014/10/31/ep-60-travel-tips-for-laura-ingalls-wilder-vacations

Or download it for free on iTunes afterwards:
http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/trundlebedtales-blog-talk/id412309121

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Sloo and Slough aka Emily of Deep Valley

October 14, 2014

My beautiful picture A version of this was originally published on Beyond Little House.

Pronounce It Sloo or Sl-wow

When I was in De Smet, South Dakota one summer, although this happens almost every time I go, I was talking about the Big Slough and how you pronounce it. You get people who pronounce slough rhymes with moo and slough rhymes with cow. As always a quote from Emily of Deep Valley popped into my head. Emily of Deep Valley is by Maud Hart Lovelace.

Maud Hart Lovelace and Betsy-Tacy

Lovelace is most famous for her Betsy-Tacy books that were loosely based on her life growing up in Mankato, Minnesota. Her childhood home and the home belonging to her inspiration for Tacy have been purchased by the society and restored in appearance to when Maud/Betsy would have lived there. There is talk about getting Tib’s house (the other lead character in the books) as well which is on the next street. Places out of these books really exist, much as they do for Laura and other places from the books have been created by fans. The fan organization, the Betsy-Tacy Society is extremely well organized and puts on a very professional conference. Most fans love the main cycle of Betsy-Tacy books best (they are now all back in print so you can read them for yourself), but the one with a special place in my heart is Emily of Deep Valley, a sort of sequel to the side. Emily doesn’t appear in the other Besty-Tacy books, she’s several years younger than Betsy, but the Betsy-Tacy-Tib characters do make a rather large cameo appearance in Emily. I loved it because it’s such a beautiful picture of large town life at the time when high schools were becoming common. It’s a lovely little epoch until the Great War brings it all down, but in their Edwardian time bubble they can’t know that. I also admire Emily’s spirit and her plans which, due to her grandfather’s needs and old-fashioned perceptions, can’t include college. It was Emily I loved.

The Big Slough Or You Say Tomato

But to get back to De Smet and the Big Slough, other fans I talked to said they had the same thing happen to them. Hearing people refer to slough, as sl-wow instead of sloo also reminded them of Emily. It’s so nice to be with people who understand you. I hope you can make your own trip to De Smet and experience it for yourself.

Oh, and the other thing a slough reference makes pop into my head is Cherry Jones reading Farmer Boy. Jones, clearly not a farm girl, says hay mow (rhymed with row) instead of hay mow (rhymes with now). Every time I listen to it, I spend the whole time I listen to Farmer Boy automatically correcting her. Now you can too. ;-)

Lovelace, Maud Hart. Emily of Deep Valley. New York: Harper Trophy, 2000. ISBN 0064408582

“The Deep Valley slough, pronounced sloo, was the marshy inlet of a river. When Emily had first read Pilgrim’s Progress, after finding it mentioned in Louisa M. Alcott’s Little Women, she had pronounced the Slough of Despond sloo, too. She had called it sloo until Miss Fowler had told her in English class that Bunyan’s Slough rhymed with “how.” Miss Fowler had made the correction in a casual unembarrassing way, putting her emphasis on the fact that Emily alone, out of the class, had read Pilgrim’s Progress.” pp.15-16.

Summary of Emily of Deep Valley

To flesh out the book a little more Emily Webster, an orphan living with her grandfather, is not like the other girls her age in Deep Valley, Minnesota. The gulf between Emily and her classmates widens even more when they graduate from Deep Valley High in 1912. Emily longs to go off to college with everyone else, but she can’t leave her grandfather and it never even occurs to him that he might send her. Emily resigns herself to facing a “lost winter,” but soon decides to stop feeling sorry for herself. With a new program of study (both on her own and with a woman’s club in town), a growing interest in the Syrian immigrant community she can help, and a handsome new teacher at the high school to fill her days, Emily gains more than she ever dreamed. This is one of three non-Betsy-Tacy novels set in the same community of Deep Valley, a stand in for her home town of Mankato, Minnesota. I love this book because it really depicts the time period so well.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.


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