Book: T Model Tommy

August 31, 2014

trundlebedtales:

Revisiting an important book about a boy and his Model T.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

I used to try hard to come up with books my little brother would read. He actually tried a few of them, but I can’t say I had a ton of success. One that I had given him that he enjoyed was called T Model Tommy by Stephen W. Meader.  I’ve recently been trying to encourage his godchildren to read and when he objected to my latest suggestion, I was surprised when he said they ought to read T Model Tommy. He remembered the book in detail (it’s been at least 15 years since he read it) and was positive they would too. I looked online and original copies seem to be going for about $80. However, I was absolutely delighted to discover it’s back in print, courtesy of the Historical Construction Equipment Association. They seem to have as fond memories of it as my brother. They have reprinted it…

View original 272 more words

September 2014 Presentations

August 29, 2014

In the KitchenSeptember tends to have a lot of Laura Ingalls Wilder events and programs and that leads to programs. This year I’m presenting at two of the events.

But even if there isn’t a program scheduled near you, it’s not too late. If you’d like me to come present near you make sure to tell your local library, museum or civic group. I’m really excited about my “In the Kitchen With Laura” program for this summer. If you are looking for a program, check them out.  Learn more here:
http://www.trundlebedtales.com/programs.html

And check out my brochure:
Brochure2014pg1

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

 

LauraPalooza Call for Papers

August 28, 2014
Laurapoloza T-Shirt

Laurapoloza T-Shirt

I had meant to get this out as soon as it was finalized on Monday, but life intervened. Check out the Call for Papers for LauraPalooza. Submissions are due on Rose Wilder Lane’s birthday (Dec. 5th) and acceptances will go out on Laura’s birthday (Feb. 7th).

http://beyondlittlehouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Call-for-Proposals-LP15.pdf

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Walnut Grove TV Show Reunion Report 1

August 23, 2014

trundlebedtales:

This was our first report looking ahead at the Walnut Grove Reunion.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

Join us for an initial report on the biggest cast reunion for 40th Anniversary of the NBC Little House on the Prairie TV Show. It will be held in Walnut Grove, Minnesota the real life version of the setting of the TV show. This was recorded at the end of October, so a few things changed since then; another cast member has signed on (find the current list at the Official website), the pageant tickets are now available for sale, and they have some of the reunion souvenirs available now at the Walnut Grove Museum Gift Shop.

Our guest was Walnut Grove museum director Amy Ankrum and Paul Valenti calls in halfway as a surprise guest. They talk about the major event the Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum and the Walnut Grove Pageant are planning for next July in honor of the 40th Anniversary of the “Little House on the Prairie”…

View original 161 more words

Great Auk

August 21, 2014

Great Auk from Pa's Big Green Animal Book

Recently I’ve been doing my best to help spread word about the Passenger Pigeon Project honoring the 100th Anniversary of the death of the last known member of this once ubiquitous species. It made me realize that I don’t have a lot of information about the Great Auk. The Great Auk is well known to Laura fans because of its reference in The Long Winter and it used to be generally well known enough that “Gone as a Great Auk” was once a popular expression to use, along the line of “Dead as a Dodo” with a great number of hits in The New York Times. Today fewer people have heard about this bird and its sad fate.

Laura and the Great Auk

The Great Auk makes only a vary brief appearance in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books. I had previously posted about it when South Dakota birders (being the people most aware of what kind of birds you see in South Dakota) came out with an article narrowing down the identity of the “Little Great Auk” that the Ingalls family rescues in The Long Winter.
https://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2009/10/22/little-great-auk/

The Great Auk itself was extinct before Laura was even born, but the family was aware of its existence through Pa’s Big Green Animal Book as it was called in the “Little House” text. Here is  image from the book and what they would have read.

“The giant-auk is three feet high, and has a black bill four inches and a quarter long, both mandibles being crossed obliquely with several ridges and furrows. Its wings are mere stumps, like those of the Antarctic penguins. Thirty pounds have been paid for its egg, which is larger than that of any European bird; and there is no knowing the price the Zoological Society would pay for a live bird, if this truly “rara avis” could still be found.”  p.86

Hartwig, Dr. G. The Polar and Tropical Worlds: A Popular and Scientific Description. Springfield, MA : C.A. Nichols, 1876. Print.

Find copies to buy (it was widely reproduced) or read an e-book version from Google Books:
http://books.google.com/books?id=uOk-AAAAYAAJ&dq=%22Polar%20and%20Tropical%20Worlds%22&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q=%22Polar%20and%20Tropical%20Worlds%22&f=false

The Great Auk and John James Audubon

Although he could not find an alive one at the time (and none had been seen in North America in decades) John James Audubon painted it to include in his Birds of North America based on a stuffed specimen in London. This image is widely available and is on my latest “Laura” shirt thanks to Cafe Press.

Here’s a link that includes the image and the Audubon’s Society’s summary of the Great Auk’s fate:
http://johnjames.audubon.org/extinction-great-auk

Once There Were Billions
http://library.si.edu/digital-library/exhibition/once-there-were-billions

You’re the Last – NPR
http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2014/02/10/274696130/if-you-re-the-last-of-your-kind-the-final-one-what-happens-to-you-3-case-studies

The Story of the Great Auk

I determined to find out more and while there are no less than two books just about Great Auk extinction I haven’t had a chance to read either yet, but I did make time for the fascinating chapter in:

Kolbert, Elizabeth. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. New York: Holt and Company, 2014. ISBN 978-0-8050-9299-8

The book tells the history of the concept and discovery of extinction and how it is continuing now. It is very interesting read, but I’m just going to share about the Great Auk. The basic story is this.

Great Auks were the original penguins (European explorers borrowed a familiar name and changed the meaning of a term once reserved for the Greak Auk because of a passing physical resemblance, as they did to many newly discovered birds and animals). Once the Great Auks ranged all over the eastern seaboard of the United States and the western coast of Europe with evidence showing that it reached as far as Florida and Italy in its range. They were well known in the Roman Empire and were pictured in some of their mosaics (geeking out some people not aware of the Great Auk’s existence into thinking the Romans made it to the poles). Penguins are their own family, but Auks are members of a family that includes Puffins and other birds that have survived. From reports Great Auks were fantastic swimmers and spent most of their lives at sea. They did return to shore for their mating period on inhospitable islands near Iceland in May and June. Unfortunately for the Great Auks, Europeans discovered the Great Cod Banks and starting in the 1500s they made regular voyages that often took them near their mating islands. So just about the time these ships were growing desperate for fresh meat, who should present themselves, but a gathering of Great Auks as large and tasty as geese and easily caught. It became an annual occurrence for each ship involved in cod fishing to come and load up at these islands and the population could not replenish under such attack.

According to Kolbert, “Auks were used as fish bait, as a source of feather for stuffing mattresses, and fuel.” Much like the bison or American buffalo on the American Great Plains they were slaughtered wantonly, sometimes even just maimed and released to die at their leisure. Estimates were that at the time of European discovery in the 1500s there were as many as a hundred thousand mating pairs on Funk Island. By the late 1700s, the decrease in their numbers was large enough to be noticed. This was unfortunate because it set off a mania as collectors for both museums and for individual collections became determined to find examples of birds and eggs for their collection, further hastening their end.

There had been three mating areas for the Great Auks. The first was Funk Island and right on the shipping lanes it was quickly disposed of. The second was Geirfuglasker Island which was taken out by a volcano in 1830. The last was a speck of an island called Eldey Island. Eldey became the Auks last stand. In June 1844 a group of Icelanders headed to Eldey by row boat. Among them Sigurour Iselfsson, Ketil Ketilsson, and Jon Brandsson fought the terrible landing conditions and went ashore. They found one pair of Great Auks and one egg. The birds tried to run, but were quickly caught. The men strangled the birds and tossed the egg aside after seeing it had cracked. The pair of birds were sold for roughly nine dollars in period money (approximately $300 in today’s money). The innards were sent to the Royal Museum in Copenhagen. The female Auk skin is now on display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, one of 78 such specimens on display around the world.  The story is known because two British naturalists, John Wolley and Alfred Newton, spent the summer of 1858 in Iceland in search of any sign of an Auk and talked to everyone they could find who had ever seen one, including men from that 1844 “hunting” trip. They realized the Auk was extinct. Newton was so moved and concerned by the experience that he set out on a mission to protect remaining species and The Act for the Preservation of Sea Birds that he pushed for passage in the United Kingdom was one of the first wildlife protection laws.

An Iowa Great Auk

Locally a replica Great Auk was for many years displayed in Bird Hall as part of the Natural History Museum on the University of Iowa Campus. Now like the examples in the NPR story above, it’s in storage.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Wilson Rawls

August 19, 2014
Dreams Can Come True

Dreams Can Come True

Jim Trelease, author of The Read-Aloud Handbook  and all around reading advocate, felt as a boy that ALL books were GIRL books and he wasn’t interested in them. The book that changed his mind was Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. Rawls was a great American storyteller and his book is one of the great dog books. Trelease has continued in his admiration and provides a wonderful tribute page to Rawls on his website. Be sure to listen to the news story and consider purchasing the CD recording of Rawls’s speech. Many people told Trelease that it was the best speech they ever heard and while I can’t go so far as that, it is an amazing speech about dreams, reading, commitment, and gratitude. I wish now I had bought a copy of the full speech earlier.
http://www.trelease-on-reading.com/rawls.html

The Life of Wilson Rawls

The Marshfield WI public library pointed out this website when I queried them about Rawls who had died in their town (at a regional medical center) and it is the best description of his life I’ve found online.
http://www.childrensliteraturenetwork.org/birthbios/brthpage/09sep/9-24rawls.html

If you had set out to create the perfect background for a writer, you’d probably pick absolutely everything the opposite of what Rawls had. Woodrow Wilson Rawls was born in Scraper, Oklamoa in 1913 and named after the sitting U.S. President. (He would publish under Wilson Rawls, but was always known as Woody to his friends.) While he had a loving family, he was born poor in hill country, where schooling was almost non-existent and books were rare, but when he was given a copy of Call of the Wild by Jack London Rawls discovered reading. He got it in his mind that he wanted to write a book like that for boys like him. That determination kept him writing for years as he bummed around the country always looking for a steady job during the Great Depression. A chance encounter with a wealthy Texan (I think he was hinting he thought it might have been LBJ, but he wasn’t sure and didn’t say so) finally landed him that steady job and time to write and so he did on whatever he could, even brown paper grocery bags split in half. His spelling was awful and his grammar was worse and he didn’t know anything about punctuation, so he was ashamed to show anyone those stories. He might have gone on like that his whole life writing away feverishly with never sharing a word, but then he met Sophie Styczinski , fell in love and got married. Before the ceremony, he burned all five novels he’d written and hundreds of short stories, etc. because he wanted to quit writing and he was so embarrassed by it he didn’t want his new wife to know. But storytelling was in his soul and he didn’t make it three months until he had to tell his wife about the stories and his writing. She told him she made enough money in her job that he should quit his day job and try writing. She typed for him, edited for him, and pushed him to try for publication. In the author blurb in the April 1, 1961 issue of  the Saturday Evening Post this is the final paragraph:

Author Rawls gives his wife [Sophie], an Atomic Energy Commission budget analyst, full credit for his novel. She served as his typist and editor and, in the year it took to complete the [rewritten] manuscript for publication, she bought the groceries, paid the rent, “and growled at neighbors who gossiped about her lazy husband.”

Eventually the story came out serialized in the Saturday Evening Post (SEP) starting with March 18, 1961 issue as The Hounds of Youth. SEP received more mail for that story than any other they published that year. (Note: They republished it as a serial under the same name in 1986.) The editor who had championed the book took it to Doubleday who published it in a lengthened form in 1962, but let it languish for 6 years without any publicity while the publisher tried to sell it as an adult book. It was when a publisher got Rawls a speaking engagement at a teacher/librarian conference that sales took off and the book sales suddenly jumped.

After Success

In the introduction to the speech, Trelease talks about the movie made about the book in 1973 (see note below) and how the Rawls attended the world premier in Salt Lake City, Utah and stayed past Midnight signing autographs and Vicki Palmquist on the Children’s Literature website I linked to above describes his involvement with the film “In 1973, the book was made into a movie. The production crew rebuilt Rawls’ childhood home in the Ozarks, and asked the Rawls to visit the set. Rawls said, ‘I stayed for ten days and relived my youth. It was wonderful.'” In his speech Rawls says that during his trip back he also revisited the little store that used to belong to his grandparents that appears in the book.

Rawls wrote his second book The Summer of the Monkeys and began a steady campaign of speaking at schools, to professional organizations, etc. After it came out he started a third (another one of those five that he’d burned), but it was never finished. Rawls and his wife had moved to Cornell, Wisconsin after her retirement and they lived there from 1975-1984. Rawls was hospitalized at a regional medical center in Marshfield, Wisconsin and it was there that Rawls passed away from cancer December 16, 1984. Findagrave informs us he was cremated and location of his remains unknown.
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=10792930

More Information Oklahoma

Once Rawls was brought to the front of my mind, I did what any reference librarian would do, I set out to see what I could find on him. Amazingly there wasn’t much. There doesn’t seem to be a biography, even though his story is clearly crying for one and he and his two books, as popular and influential as they are, seem not to create much interest online. So here is what I found.

Today the Rawls archive is held by the Cherokee Heritage Center (he was a member of the tribe through his mother), it is maintained in paper form only without even an online finding aid:
http://www.cherokeeheritage.org

Read a short biography of Rawls from the Oklahoma Historical Society:
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/r/ra020.html

Tahlequah Public Library of Tahlequah, Oklahoma was named a National Literary Landmark for the roll it played in inspiring Rawls to write as a boy (Sadly their own website makes no reference to this):
http://www.ala.org/united/products_services/literarylandmarks/landmarksbyyear/2011/rawls
http://www.okfriends.net/rawls.html

As part of the National Literary Landmark status they were supposed to put a digital version of the booklet they produced about him online. When I wrote the first draft of this a few months back, I reached out to every contact I could find  to see if it had materialized and if they had any of the paper copies left. At that time, three years after they were supposed to put it up, they assured me it would be up “within two weeks.” I contacted them again before I published this and was informed it’s been delayed as they are creating a separate website for National Literary Landmark winners from Oklahoma to post it. If I get word it’s been put up, I’ll post again.

Tahlequah also holds an annual Red Fern Festival in Rawls’s honor:
http://www.redfernfestival.com

More Information Idaho

As I said the Tahlequah Public Library which was named a landmark in his name, seems to be doing its best to ignore Rawls. On the other hand Idaho Falls, Idaho where Rawls was living when he wrote the book has a major tribute to him on their website. They didn’t even know Rawls was living there when he wrote Where the Red Fern Grows for many years, but once they discovered it they’ve made up for lost time on all fronts from collecting and hosting research information to raise a statue in his honor. I now have it on my Life Goals list to visit that statue. Anyone who is interested in Rawls needs to check out the Idaho Falls Library.
http://www.ifpl.org/index.asp?p=rawls/origin

My Discovery

I want to admit that while I had long had that recording of Rawls in my consideration file, it probably wouldn’t have suddenly jumped to the top of my list. It was because my nephew was assigned to read Where the Red Ferns Grows in school and I wanted to support his interest in it that I set out on this search. I’m try glad I did. It didn’t make me want to read Where the Red Fern Grows again (because I can’t even make it through the prologue where the young boy in the story is now a grown man without crying), but I discovered that not only could I still tell you all about that story, but my brother, who despite a lot of trying was never really a pleasure reader, also could still you all about the book a good 2 decades after he read it. That must mean something. I also discovered that I’m sorry I never got the chance to meet Wilson Rawls because I think I would have liked him a lot. Listening to him tell the story of his life I decided he was someone who Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder would have really liked and that their daughter Rose Wilder Lane would have looked down on, which is all the endorsement I need. I also learned about the Idaho Falls Public Library who is doing amazing things to support him and appears to be a bright shining light of an example to public libraries everywhere in their role as local history archive. So I’m very pleased to share with you what I’ve learned about Rawls.

NOTE: In addition to the movie described above that was made 1973 with Rawls’s cooperation and input, a straight to video sequel (Where the Red Fern Grows 2) was made when such things were hot in 1992 and Disney Studios remade the original in 2003.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation. Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+, LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Iowa Changing Statue in Capitol

August 17, 2014

trundlebedtales:

UPDATE 2014: They did switch out Borlaug for Harlan and hopefully I’ll get a chance to do a further post about that soon. So far no further attempts to dethrone Samuel Kirkwood which I’m truly glad about.

Originally posted on Sarah's Notebook:

By an act of Congress in 1864, each state is allowed two statues of “notable citizens” to be displayed in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall. Each state is allowed two and only two statues. If they choose, states may switch who they honor, but in doing so they have to remove a previous honoree. Iowa has started the process to do so, replacing James Harlan with Norman Borlaug.

While I feel Norman Borlaug is certainly worthy of the honor (see my post on him below) I think it’s unfortunate to rip it away from the current honorees.

http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2009/10/23/norman-borlaug-food-hero

I’m especially disturbed with their repeated dismissal of Samuel Kirkwood and James Harlan as mere “19th-century politicians.” Samuel Kirkwood was Iowa’s Civil War governor. He kept the state going during one of the most difficult times in the state’s history. “During the Civil War the governor was credited with recruiting…

View original 470 more words

De Smet Memorial Society Hands On Activities

August 15, 2014
Surveyor's House

Surveyor’s House

This spring the Laura Ingalls Wilder Society started a new program for school trips.

According to the April 30, 2014 issue of The De Smet News, “The Society has created customized field trips, which allow visitors to choose one out of three different options for each 30 minute session. The length of the tour will depend on how many of the sessions a group chooses to participate in.”

Programs include:

The First School of De Smet has 3 options for an activity there:

  • Surviving the Long Winter – Survival activities like grinding wheat.
  • Writing With Laura – Journal Writing
  • Pioneer School Day – Comparing one-room schools to modern schools

The Discovery Center also has 3 options for an activity:

  • Pioneer Dress Up – Trying on clothes, sew on treadle sewing machine
  • Fund and Games on the Prairie – Play pioneer games
  • I’d Rather Be Hunting – Art of Tracking
Rear of Third Street House

Rear of Third Street House

The Ingalls Home offers these 3 options:

  • If You Can’t Stand the Heat – Ma chores like hauling water and corncobs and compare to a modern kitchen
  • Meet Mary, Laura’s Sister – Learn Braille and do beadwork without vision
  • Family Game Night – Families play pioneer games together

They shared photos from one such tour group on their blog:
http://discoverlaura.wordpress.com/2014/05/14/school-field-trip-fun-at-the-historic-homes-of-de-smet

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

Handwriting Useless?

August 13, 2014

Living in the early years of the digital age, many people say that children learning handwriting is useless. However, handwriting is still important and research shows its effect on the brain versus typing is even more so. The Wall Street Journal reported on the research. http://on.wsj.com/p2ztiO

I just don’t see how you can get by with just typing or even text typing in all situations unless you just don’t do things you should, like leave a note, like make drawings in notes because it’s easier to understand, etc. Frankly I think as tablet technology improves the value in handwriting will once again become obvious. Since we’re talking handwriting if you haven’t yet seen it, after a long search (actually about 2 years and being told repeatedly it wasn’t in this cemetery which gives as a founding date a full year and a half after he died) I located Austin Palmer (the founder of Palmer Method of writing)’s grave in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  Here’s the video.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on  FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.

In the Kitchen With Laura July 2014

August 11, 2014

IMG_0044This the seventh in my series of monthly projects that I hope will get you excited about In the Kitchen With Laura. I’m finally caught up again and here is my post for July. In the Kitchen With Laura has continued to be a popular program this year. The photo above was taken during one of my programs. During the program we learn about Laura’s life and have the opportunity for hands on projects like making Ginger Water.

If it’s a really, REALLY hot day and you drink ice cold water, it might sound good, but the odds are you will get stomach cramps for your trouble. You could drink as much ginger water as you wanted though with no such problem. (My brother would say it’s because nobody would want to drink that much, but it really divides people over whether they like it or not.)

Ginger Water from Sarah Uthoff on Vimeo.

Ginger Water

3/4 cup packed brown sugar

1 tsp. powdered ginger

1/2 cup cider vinegar

1 quart cold water

1 tsp. baking soda

Add brown sugar and ginger to a pitcher and mix. Pour in cider vinegar mixing until they dissolve. Add cold water and stir. Add the baking soda right before serving, stirring well. After initial bubbling ends, you may add more baking soda to start it again. It may be kept overnight either on the counter covered or in a refrigerator. The continued chemical reaction will change the taste, but it will continue to work. It’s most effective though when freshly mixed. After the second day throw away any that is left and start over.

If you’ve never tried ginger water before start with a very small taste. People are very divided over whether they like it or not. I’ve given out maybe a 1000 tastes over the years and people are normally evenly divided between swallowing it down, but hating it and those who ask for more. At the extremes, you get a few spitter outters and a few recipe ask forers about every time you make a batch.

A drink of a very similar make up and purpose, but with a much more exotic name is Switchel. It was recently highlighted on a PBS cooking show.

Sarah S. Uthoff is the main force behind Trundlebed Tales fighting to bring the History, Mystery, Magic and Imagination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and other greats of children’s literature and history to life for a new generation.Attend one of her programs, schedule one yourself, watch her videos, listen to her podcast, and find her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+,  LinkedIn, and Academia.edu. She is currently acting President of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Legacy and Research Association. Professionally she is a reference librarian at Kirkwood Community College and director of the Oxford (Iowa) Public Library.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,766 other followers

%d bloggers like this: